The Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Health Care Workers

Short Wave
|

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

A year ago when the pandemic hit the united states took to argue even solid was working. As a researcher stanford university solace is a surgeon but wasn't practicing medicine at the time but seeing the need for doctors in new york city flew there in april of last year to volunteer her time at hospital. Working in the icu. Now remember spring of two thousand twenty. It was still the early days of the pandemic and new york was the first city in the united states to be hit so hard all my feelings and thoughts were by far by the people. Dying wasn't much in terms of treatment for covid. Nineteen at the time and the number of people getting hospitalized and dying was climbing fast almost every day for almost every patient. I'm calling saying there is no improvement and maybe things are worse right from the start of the pandemic healthcare workers have stepped up beyond what many of them were trained to do so to say that this past year has been stressful for them is an understatement for me. I think it's mostly been anxiety. I think that i've had Definitely tendencies toward depression. And i have seen a therapist in the last six months or so. A recent poll by the kaiser family foundation and the washington post found that about six in ten healthcare workers a struggling with mental health issues as a result of the stress of the pandemic more than half say they're burnt out which is a response to chronic stress at work. One of the things that has come out of my time in the icu has been a need for more connection with people. I think when we see people dying every day We need some reassurance that that there is

Coming up next