Abby Wambach: If you're not a good leader on the bench, you cannot call yourself a good leader on the field.

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen. Today, we have a very special guest joining us abby Wambach is here with us on skin from the couch she is a two time Olympic gold medalist, a FIFA World Cup champion, and a member of the national soccer hall of fame. Also, she hasn't slowed down in retirement she is now a New York Times. Author and equal pay activists. We I had the pleasure of meeting abby when we spoke to her wife, Glennon Doyle on the show in March and we dragged her onto the podcast as well, and if you haven't listened to that episode, go check it out. It's a good one abby. Thank you so much for joining us today. Welcome to skin from the catch. Yeah. Thanks for having me. I'm so thrilled and honored to be with you all on three different couches. Thou-. Before. We jump into our first question I have to tell you I was looking at our prep for this and there was one bullet in here. That has really made me laugh as I have to share it, which is that you used to have a special card that got you a free Burrito a day from AAA but it stopped working when you're retired that seems passive aggressive for sure to Poli what the F.. Yeah. So when I first got this card, it was Gosh I must've been ten years ago now and you know like the gold cards portly for life like essentially my name is on it and you guys don't know how I go way back. From the early days and I mean I would get a Burrito. Day You guys we're both creatures of habits. I respect this. Yeah. It was crazy and this is before we really knew how many calories were in each burrito. Bowl that I would make or Burrito early days. and. So then yeah, of course when I retired, I was super excited to still be able to get one free Burrito a week for year, but they never really checked up on it but then I think when I got a family when I married Glenn and attained. That you know fifteen dollar meal. Turned into a sixty five dollar meal or seventy dollars meal for the whole family and pull was like I. Don't know if we're GONNA keep floating this for her so. It was a good run while it lasted I'm sorry that you've struggled with that but I did make me laugh as read. So, we're going to jump into our very first question. We'd like to ask everybody it just skim your resume skin my resume. It's so funny because when you retire, that's like that's essentially what I've had to do over the last four or five years of my life since retiring from playing on the national team, and if people don't really know I played for a long time on our women's national team. So Ski. My life I'm the youngest of seven children I grew up in Rochester New York, and I went to the University of Florida and played soccer there for four seasons where after I was drafted number two by the way just remember this folks you don't get drafted number one. You can still succeed I was drafted number two out of college to go play for a team called The Washington freedom the best player in. The world at the time. Mia. Hamm played on that team and it really changed my life because we were able to develop a connection that then transferred into me getting called into the national team and playing on the national team in scoring goals in the national team, and then I had a pretty long career representing his country won a gold medal. I want a couple of medals actually I won a fee. For Women's World Cup. World. Cup. I should say it doesn't matter if you're a guy or girl that's pretty awesome in my retirement I have kind of taken on this activism role that when I play ironically when I played I was a little bit more like just go and do my job and we were going to show our activism rather than talk about it. But when you quit playing, you gotta actually transfer that. Because I can't play anymore I can't show it in the ways that I used to. So I've transitioned into becoming a public speaker and an activist and apparent and wife, and that is my skin. Has a great skin? What is it like to be really good at something where young 'cause I have? No clue. Yeah I mean it's confidence building you know I felt like. Okay. I know that I'm good at this thing over here but I think you know all of us have our little things right? Like no matter what kind of. Place we grew up or family we grew up in or what kind of trauma we we experienced as a child because we all do some of US feel like we're unlovable my case in particular some of us were neglected. Some of us were over parented like we all have problems inside of our family dynamics that for me really allowed me to and gave me the courage to propel in this kind of an individualistic career. So when I was young I kind of was a very big risk taker. I was a free spirit is what they called me, I think that's what they call children who don't follow the rules as much as their parents want them to and I think that the other side of that coin is I was really trying to get the attention of my parents, right. So the very thing that might have felt trauma or hardship from in my childhood is the very thing that made me successful. So I have to always remember that like as much as I as young as seven children. As much as all of us wanted the attention of our parents, I do think that kind of parent team actually shaped me and and allowed me to explore this competitiveness inside. In this drive and this embiid to go after what I needed and what I wanted. So I give a lot of credit to that form of parenting into that trauma

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