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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

John Henson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program single rhythm dance the Blues Education for the Liberation of black and Brown girls with author. Dr Monique. W W Moore's in black America. Our research is showing and the research of others and and and other folks who have been engaged in this work both at the advocacy level and at the academic levels. They're finding that black girls are experiencing you know a form of adult education When they're in and out of schools Delta fixation is a term that has been deeply explored by the George Town Center on poverty and inequality that has that shows how adults are are reading the behaviors of black girls to be more adult like than their white peers. Which means that? They're seeing our girls as needing less protection less nurturing less comforting that they are believed to be more independent and to know more about adult subjects such as sex than their white counterparts. And all of this really Begins when black girls are five years old and it peaks when they're between the ages of ten and fourteen which is also when we see peaks in their contact with disciplinary actions in school in the follow up to accrue claim book push out Social Justice Scholar and author. Dr Monique W Moore's has pushed the envelope. Further and in writing or latest book singer Rhythm Dance of Blues. He traveled from Oakland to Ohio and from New York to Iowa City and beyond she described Kanner and love what it looks like to meet the complex needs of girls on the margin in doing so she also a collection of ideas from educators who are tuned to the patterns of Pain Rain and struggle. And who show how. Those working in schools can harness their wisdom to partner with students and help the girls they teach find value and joy in learning far too often these young ladies on given the benefit of the doubt many I misunderstood thereby putting him on the path to incarceration singer singer rhythm dance the blues a guide to move away from punishment trauma and discrimination towards safety justice and genuine community in our schools. US recently in Black America spoke with. Dr Moore's this is actually my fifth book. I did Street novel beautiful for words and then I also worked with Kemba Smith. It's on her. Biographer does right I do. I did read that highest Campbell. Not doing well from all I can see she is. She's threatening. It's it's wonderful to see we're particularly drew you to education. I started my life in education. I was teaching very young. And you know I have. I have sort of veered away from I'm teaching and moved into research and policy for a while Though never fully releasing education as an important focal point in my work and I started to talk more intensely about the the discipline disparities After seeing data that when showing that African American girls were experiencing exclusionary disciplined suspensions expulsions etc at higher rates than their white counterparts. And so oh I understand and have always understood education to be a critical protective factor against contact with the juvenile court or criminal legal system. It's one of the reasons I call it. Freedom Work and when I see these interruptions taking place and this criminalization occurring of our girls it was really important for me to be a part of a community to elevate the issue but also to examine some of the solutions to this crisis thus far what are some of the analysis. We've come up with on this journey. Well unfortunately currently what we've been finding is that black girls continue to be. The only group of girls who are over represented across the spectrum of discipline in schools and at every educational level will in their educational journey and so You know that has Continue to you know sort of lead our inquiry around how we interrupt these cycles else How we elevated in consciousness how we elevated in consciousness of those who are working in schools who have children in schools who are concerned about what goes on in schools but also you know in the course of having these conversations about the problem I have discovered a number of programs and strategies that have done tremendous work with are girls that have you know really discovered pathways in the schools outside of the schools and in partnership with schools to transform the conditions that are really at the root cause of much of the behavior that girls ended up in trouble for in schools? And so it's a tale of concern in terms of wanting to address a critical issue. That really should be at the forefront of folks minds but also I would say you know an inspiring tale of how when we understand. There's a problem and set our intentions to shift the outcomes. We actually actually do it. How did you come up with the title? So singer them dance the Blues Education for the Liberation of black and brown girls. I think the framework of it being You sort of rooted in the musical traditions and artistic traditions at the black community. You know sort of came. Organically to me I ride in the introduction about a grainy black and white video that I was watching a Billie holiday singing strange fruit and as I was discovering what was happening on the road and sort of interacting with with many black women and girls specifically in communities and and you know dozens of communities It occurred to me that obviously what we're experiencing is a form of the blues but that we shouldn't only see the blues as a limited. We shouldn't only limit the blues to entertainment or see it as a vessel for for the expression of pain. I felt that it was important in in observing some of the traditions rooted in the Blues and some of the practices in our own communities throughout up the country to recognize that the blues is a platform for truth telling that would then enable us to really seek and obtain the healing thing that is necessary for us to move forward in this work. You write about in the book that African Americans and and the teenage girl dizziness girls are struggling to realize it. True you a deputy as scholars making net point. What do you see? Some of the detriments is going on in between those four walls. Well our the research is showing and the research of other folks who've been engaged in this work you know both at the advocacy level and at the academic levels. They're finding that black girls are experiencing you know a form of adult education When they're in and out of schools Adult education is a term that has been deeply explored Lord by the Georgetown Center on poverty and inequality that has that shows how adults are reading the behaviors of black girls to be more adult like than their white peers. Which means that they're seeing our girls as needing less protection less nurturing less comforting that they are believed to be more independent to know more about adult built subjects such as sex than their white counterparts? And all of this really begins when black girls are five years old and it peaks when they're between the ages of ten and fourteen. which is it's also when we see peaks in their contact with disciplinary actions in schools? And so it's really important to understand that when we render. Our girls is more adult like than they actually are. Then we believe that. They're in greater control of their behaviors than they actually are developmentally and it just feeds into a cycle where are girls are perceived as defiant and Saffi and loud problematic or bad real words that we assigned to our young people in schools. Are Our girls especially disproportionately renders them vulnerable to being taken out of school. which then of course places them at risk of participating in underground economies he's and being in contact with the juvenile quarter criminal legal system so these are the cycles were trying to disrupt are the readings of black girl behaviors? The increasing ways in which Latina girls and indigenous girls are also being criminalised in schools and also the elements that we can put in place to structure true accountability ability and to really respond to much of what underlies the negative behavior which in most cases with our girls is a traumatic event. Or you know as a sort of set of conditions that present harm in their lives.