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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

It's summer from all these four seasons. How does song figure into your movie? And at what point you start thinking about a scene where someone someone is listening to this music. Let's the paradox. It's that that this scene was which is let the lesson of the film. It was like the first thing that I had in mind It's kind of the scene. I made the movie because I had that scene in mind. I wanted to lend and the film there and basically wrote the film to actually make that scene and sometime when I got lost in the process crosses over writing a little bit discouraged I had that scene in mine and I knew that I had to do the film to do with diversity. June I'm GonNa ask you about the research you did when you're writing this story so you have this scene in your mind. How the movies and and you work backward from that? How much time are you thinking about Traditions Shins and customs and what was going on in the world for women of a certain age at this period in history? Well I did some research mostly regarding The woman artist at the time so I work with this logistic yard. Creating this the female painter character on even sociologically her being really accurate to the time but For the rest west mostly like when when I asked the experts like how women doing with a period at the time however they hailing abortion at the time like they know everything about their hair. They know everything about how they should dress and behave. But Dad didn't know much about them. Team that privacy so it was mostly relying on the fact that What go through I go through also and teach to build this continually Trump time relying lying on that Rather than being accurate about the mundane way of you know the way they would do would perform in the world because we always see that right especially in period pieces it's about performing in the world and that's why I put them on an island Basically being just you know never being with the characters characters just being totally lonely so that we could share it intimacies with so even though they're isolated these women live in a world where a a woman of marrying age is bartered or as advertised or is marketed. The way that you would on tinder or match where you're swiping but the swiping now is a oil painting that sent to a prospective suitor so in many ways things have not changed at all technology has evolved. Aw The way that matches are found like do you like the photo you like the picture. Swipe up by sending a letter back to France. Yeah but that's the it's much more in a self-portrait dynamic but do you have more power over an alleged edged. You're you're crafting for yourself. I don't know what I mean. It's too early to think about that. No I want to ask you about the characters that are at the center of this story. Mariana Louise they have strong feelings about a lot of things but they live in a time where you don't really say what's on your mind and you don't share what your deepest most personal feelings are so when you're working with your actors. How'd you describe how they are communicating? What they feel when they can't always give voice to those feelings while you know? I think they're giving voice to the fundings. I feel it's just that we decided I choose to craft his love dialogue Not Building it on the narrative of conflict or being secretive So it's not about Chelsea about position it's about saying what's on your mind. I think they're being pretty honest with each other. We're not that used to that. There's is no mind game here and I'm not sure it's about Defected set in the past. I think it's about the fact that it that it's written today by us and many of us I mean myself screenwriter but also the actress they they build this very strong choreography this tension about with with the dialogue but also the the their body and we're looking very carefully what it's like to fall in love so it's also about how look at each other but also how they breed how the and their body language and the chemistry I think is very strong so we're talking with Selene Ziama who is the writer and director of portrait of a lady on fire. Men Are not present in this movie. We outside of a couple of scenes but they are hovering on the outside. How did you talk about the presence of men even though Oh they weren't in the picture what actually we didn't talk about it? That's the good thing that's just. I mean Manna left out of the frame. And that's how you feel that prisons because it's not about a male character it's about jd of patriarchy. So we're using the tools of cinema. That is yeah what you put in the rain. What you leave out of the frame that defines the frame so it gives you an experience of feeling this pression without having the oppressive character So that's also not to objectify man because we don't want to objectify anyone. It's also way to feel scene because when you're always into frame you're not seeing yourself. And like for instance. I did the Dow the bone is for the DVD the French DVD like three weeks ago and there was a sound engineer mail. You hadn't seen the film and we watched a film together and at some point. There's a man that comes back into frame and you see a close up of the hand of a man and I saw him looking at his hand and he's like I've never he was seeing on buddy because he got got out of the frame back. When you're thinking about how you and your cinematographer offer shoot this film? Is it easy to unlearn the things that you think a shot is supposed to have how women are supposed to look how their bodies are supposed to be positioned that you have to constantly say this is. I have to forget everything I've seen in been taught. Yeah but it's it's it's pretty joyful because forget those things yes if you can. That's sometimes hard to unlearn patterns. Yeah but that's why you have to be radical because otherwise it's go coming back so it has to be it has to be radical and stick to it because yes there's like for instance. They don't smile at each other for an hour and ten minutes. I know that's not good advertising but And on the set they had such great chemistry in such it was such a beautiful thing thing to see those two actors together. Everybody kept saying. Oh maybe you could take the smile at each other like this could be more joyful. This is your producers or who's suggests Joseph Assistant Director you know and I just it's about resisting it's also about really not not letting go won't be useful indicating room will. It shouldn't be useful in the editing room. We have to we have to be radical to resist the charming side of actually shooting the