Brian Watt, Tanya Moseley, NPR discussed on Morning Edition

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A storefront black charity. And you came in and somebody for the church like oh, are you driving? Armor on whether you think like I get fresh with you on church Sunday. It's just that jarring moment of whoa. My expectations or sumptious are totally wrong. But they also realize there was no indication that what they're seeing couldn't be true. And I think if people were to see more diverse representations of interracial couples specifically to people of color together, then that would open their horizons to who they date, so at, you know, a couple of months ago like last year before people got to know you always talk about you, and they like all my gosh. You guys like sounded amazing and your boyfriend. Sounds amazing. And then some of them like when they saw on Instagram or person that you're Asian. They were like, oh my gosh, I didn't know he was Asian. But then, as soon as I said that they would say out loud themselves, but I don't know why I wouldn't have thought that, like you know what I mean, they're like, actually, like, there's nothing to make me assume he wouldn't be. And so we, we have people questions their preconceived notions of. Who can be with who and why they think that you know what I love about this is that they've clearly gotten very comfortable with this and all the ramifications of it. But they're still this sound of surprise that this is the relationship that they've wound up in and it's working so. Well, yeah. And it also is a show that when you are in an interracial relationship, having discussions around race is something that is an evolving discussion that you might have for the rest of your lives because you sit in a very unique place in this world in both of you have different experiences that you'll be reconciled with each other. I also love them because I think about this moment in time and the push for representation, but other day I saw the trailer for the movie, the sun is the star. And the character is a plaque woman. Asian man falling in love. It's around calm, and I thought you know, this is beautiful. This is what folks are yearning for, you know, I had a new kids on the block on my wall. And I still love them, by the way, my daughter has BTS. On the wall on the wall Korean void. Van these are things that we're seeing volving over time representation that I think is truly enlightening and really cool to see now kick. U E, DS Tanya Moseley, host of truth be told the new episode on colonized desire. That's what you wanna call it drops today. Thank you, thank you. You're listening to morning edition on D. I'm Brian watt. And stay tuned. More news NPR news ahead for you. Here's Joe with another traffic.

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