Lis Wiehl Shares the Intriguing Tale of 'A Spy in Plain Sight'

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We have a really exciting guest talking about a very exciting book and subject, exciting, depressing, amazing. I don't know where to begin. You probably already know my guest. Lee's wheel, maybe you saw her over the years on Fox News or on CNN or any place just a prominent legal mind federal prosecutor on and on and on. It goes, and she has now written a book. I got to tell you, it's nothing less than shocking. It's titled a spy in plain sight. The inside story of the FBI and Robert Hanssen, America's most damaging Russian spy, remember the Cold War folks. Remember when we were at war with the Soviet Union, they were a superpower in those days. And there was somebody on the inside. It just, it's one of the most amazing stories ever. A number of books have been written about it. This is being called the best of them all, a spy in plain sight Lee's wheel. Welcome to the program. Eric, it's great to be with you. Thanks so much for that kind introduction. Well, I tell you, when I read originally about Robert Hansen, it was one of these things, it's out of a movie. It's a nightmare that somebody would be this deeply embedded in our FBI working for our enemies. Today it would be, you know, working for China. But give us the background for people who don't remember the details, the timing, the years, the decades, so that we have some sense of who this monster Robert Hansen was. Yeah, and you've got it right. He really is a monster. I mean, finally, he's locked up now forever. So he's in a 24 hour or 23 hour solitary confinement and Florence Colorado in a supermarket, a super max. But started, you know, kind of an unremarkable upbringing. He was a middle class in Chicago, his father was a cop, kind of trying to tough on him. I mean, really tough on him. We'd call it child abuse now. But he grew up, became an accountant and then joined the FBI, which was really the Pinnacle for him. You know, it was just the thing that he wanted to be. He admired James Bond. He wanted to be everything, James Bond. So the enters in the early 80s into the bureau. And Eric within a year of entering the FBI, he approaches the Russians. They don't have to flip him. He approaches them. He doesn't tell them who he is, but he says he has this great Intel information for them. And indeed, it is the first thing that he's gives them is the identity of our major the primo Russian asset that we had at the time on the ground. And of course, we rely on those people to give us information from you said it, China, North Korea, Russia. He was at the very top level of the counter espionage unit in the

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