Rep. Kevin McCarthy Explains That Passing Legislation Isn't Always the Best Thing

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

You're in the Senate. You watch this stuff going back and forth. I told you maybe many years ago that a dear friend of mine and a mentor Mind Senator Paul Laxalt on Nevada, Ronald Reagan's Putty. When I was a young man, I visited the Senate. I didn't know Senator Laxalt. He was nice enough to meet me. I mean, I was from Pennsylvania, not Nevada. But I was agreeing with the president or president. To be on the Panama Canal. And I wanted to meet Paul Laxalt because he was taking the lead on this and I sat with him. My father and I did and you must have given us 40 minutes. One of the things he said to me, Mike was every day This body meets, We lose a little bit of our liberty. That is stuck with me for 43 years. It's true, isn't it? Absolutely absolutely true. And it becomes more true mark every single day that passes when we as Americans are asked By the mainstream news media by the entertainment Industry and also by our academic establishment in America work as to accept this deeply flawed assumption. Passing legislation is in the abstract, a good thing, but it's an unmedicated. Good to pass things. We forget the fact that you know, passing something isn't always the right thing. And in fact, Lot of that time. It's just adding to the complexity of the law, which operates as a sort of subsidy. For the already wealthy and well connected. It's actually an impairment to liberty, and that's why the founding fathers made it very difficult to pass federal legislation and limited that further. By limiting the subject matter of what we could even legislate on. That's why I get very frustrated with people saying, Oh, the problem with Washington is that nothing can get done nothing to get past because of the spread lock. Mark. You don't get to be $28 Trillion in debt without a whole lot of

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