Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

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Our lead story today is one of demand and supply in that order. The commodity in question is semiconductors. The demand as we'll explain is nearly universal the supply well it's lagging and more so every day bloomberg got its hands on some data from the susquehanna financial group that says if you order a chip today the aforementioned semiconductors you're going to have to wait seventeen weeks for it to be delivered. Four plus months that is to put it mildly no way to run a supply chain. And as marketplace's samantha field reports. It is doing damage to way more than cars or computers or smartphones. These days almost everything has a chip whether we think of it as high tech or not. If it has a plug or battery probably has chips in it glenn. O'donnell research director at forrester says that includes refrigerators video. Doorbells and light bulbs you can turn on with your phone and even lower tech things like kids toys because all the toys gotta talk now and they got to react and they have little motors right. Now there's a shortage of all kinds of chips. Even the most basic ones says china vasan an analyst at bloomberg intelligence for. It doesn't matter if it's one hundred dollars or fifty cent part. There's just not enough capacity at factories around the world to meet the demand from all of the industries. That need chips because there's such a shortage. The semiconductor industry is having to pick and choose what to prioritize says. Mario morales at market research company. Idc it's for prioritizes. The large scale lear is like computing. Mobile phones is the largest market so though supply chains are always going to get priority and other companies especially smaller are going to have to wait longer for chips so shrine of austin at bloomberg says if you need something like a new appliance anytime soon even if you don't care about it being smart all of those products will be in. Short supplies are investigating line and shrim- boston says the shortage is likely to get worse before it gets better

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