Monica Gessen, Hannah Arendt, World War Two discussed on Throughline

Throughline
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

I'm routine at louis. I'm random and on this episode of through line from npr the anatomy of autocracy on You could never predict the particulars you know. I never could have imagined guy in pajama pants and horns walking around the capital. A few weeks after the insurrection at the us capitol and just a week. After the inauguration of a new president there russian-born journalist. Monica gessen writes for the new yorker and focuses on autocratic regimes among other things is still thinking about how the united states ended up here with its democracy under attack. We had a president who was very clearly inciting political violence for years and also president who had the election voice casting doubt consistently on the election. Basically telling people that it was going to be stolen no matter what. So while i'm shocked. I'm not at all surprised. And the words of hannah arendt the writer political theorist and philosopher who lived through world war two and much of the cold war had been swirling around in. Mahesh's mind the person who defined talibanism totalitarian movements in the sense that we understand them. Hana arend bush. What she thought was possible anywhere. The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not convinced. Nazi are the convinced communist. Shouldn't think it was somehow specific to germany and the soviet union but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction and.

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