Scurvy, James Lind, Apple discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

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Fresh fruit onboard isn't a realistic solution since they would all spoil before you got to your destination. Yeah. So maybe you make a drink out of it to store it, but you have to preserve in some way like maybe boil it. So the next time you go you bring barrels of boiled lemon drink which little do, you know is actually useless against scurvy because the boiling actually inactivates the vitamin C does. Guys does when your crew gets sick from scurvy, even well, drinking, the lemon juice like well, okay? I guess it's not citrus and the links between what caused scurvy what prevented it and what treated it? They just weren't very straightforward. All right throw into that defect. That scurvy was also successfully treated by certain plants and the consumption of fresh meat, and you can see why it remains such a mystery and problem for so long, even with all this knowledge. It's interesting though, that in Egypt their remedy was just a blanket fresh fruits and vegetables, which is more broad, right? We're not trying to get. So specific like you need to have a citrus fruit. It's interesting, but I buy I guess they're just like it's hard. It's interesting. And it's I mean, I do think I do think that we have a tendency to look back negatively on the observation powers. Sure people and I think that's not fair necessarily. Considering the context in which they live, right? Yeah. And I really I think the way that you put it in context is really it makes it a lot more clear. So thank you. But people had to do something money and goods, I mean lives are being lost. In walks James Lind, an officer in the British Royal Navy who in the seventeen hundreds decides to run a clinical trial for scurvy curative. Oh my gosh. Wow. Very exciting. Yeah. I'm not sure that it would pass a medical review board today. That's not really the issue. They usually wouldn't know one group of men with scurvy would be given oranges and lemons another apple cider and a third nothing. Okay. And there were other treatments in there as well. As you might predict the ones who ate the oranges and lemons recovered, the fastest followed by the apple cider group and the third group just didn't get better. Did they eventually give them oranges? Or did. They know. This was a pretty resounding answer though to how to prevent scurvy. Yeah. Eat citrus. Yeah. Lind wrote up his results and thoughts which were widely read it would take about forty years for his advice to be heated in the late seventeen. Hundreds the practice of providing lime or lemon juice to British sailors began, hence, the nickname limi- a slow the words for lemon lime were interchangeable both in English and many other. Yeah. Languages as we have Lima Lima. We've learned. I have a question. Yeah. You keep saying that they would eat lemons. Uh-huh. Would they use like Chow Dona? We're lemons different back, then because I cannot imagine just showing down on Levin mostly it would be like lemon juice would do. So they would maybe add sugar or okay? Yeah. I was just picturing them like here. Son, chewy lemon. And I was like, wow, people were bowled back. Then. So even though sailors were being given lemon lime juice. This didn't really mean that scurvy disappeared at all throughout the eighteen hundreds. It's still popped up on some of the ships that were giving their crew lemon juice mostly because during the preparation the vitamin C was inactivated in some way. But it also started appearing more and more on land in prisons, for instance, where certain prisoners were denied potatoes. And onions, I don't know why in California gold rush country like our firsthand account. So if you wanted to try your hand at gold prospecting, you had to either travel by land in a wagon across the entire US..

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