Conversation With Cheryl Walsh

PhotoBiz Xposed
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

We're going to jump into this interview with Cheryl Wash in just a second, if you are hearing this announcement doesn't mean you are listening to the free version of the podcast that means you won't be here in the full interview today was show. So if you want to hear more printing in house had generate siles from your fine art photography had a mock it. You'll find out photography and find buyers for your work. If you want to hear more bet all of that grab a pre-membership, he can trial it for thirty days for one dollar of red photo basics. Dot Com Ford Slash Tri. Photocopies X DOT COM slash try sign up, get full access to the interview with. Today plus get access to the full back catalogue and everything else that goes along with premium membership. Hopefully, I'll see you in this soon. Isis it's time for Andrew. Special guest. The time fine art photographer gets thrown around a lot in our industry. In some cases, it feels like the photographer is purely looking for liable to place on their work that files to successfully deliver an idea message on emotion. Today's guest is a portrait and underwater fine art photographer and she does not fall into that category. Her photography has a dream like appearance featuring floating goddesses that appear to be more like masterful paintings than photographic. She says, I shoot dramatic underwater portrait's that are reflective of overcoming troubles in my life. She only photographs in our pool and she maintains full control over her work by doing all the printing herself. Time was divided between high school, senior photography and fine out underwater and portrait photography. But now it's one hundred percent underwater photography and she's earned way too many awards to list here that include to mention just a few international portrait image of the year winner of the coveted wpri Grand Award two thousand and sixteen triple massive distinction from WPI. I'm talking about, Cheryl? And I'm rat to have a he with his now Cheryl. Welcome. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure when you hear about Y- I, guess you photography business does it surprise you that you are where you are now? Oh, absolutely. Yes. Yeah. I'm a middle aged mom with a minivan. and. That's Kinda how I think of myself. The rest is sort of all been you know fill in the time. A to get the sense on I'm not sure these dotted at photographing seniors and then failing to the underwater photography at the white went. Yeah. Yeah. I started out like a lot of photographers do knowing I wanted to you know to make a living with my camera tried a lot of different things tried weddings and babies families, and and very quickly discovered that my passion was for these seventeen. Year olds who were not quite adults yet but not children either, and that's the only time in their whole life. They get to be in that kind of inbetween place and I just loved working with them and capturing them who they were not based on Taga Fi trends but really truly an editorial style who they were and I absolutely love doing not. So that's where I put my focus. And in the process of that I sort of fell into trying underwater photography with a senior with her prom dress on and the very first time I. Did it. I realized that this was going to become a problem. I really liked it a lot and Kinda got hooked. Yeah. So. How different was that I image will those first images compared to what you're creating did I I would say like night and day but night and day are both times of the day. So they have something in common. No my work when I first started looks absolutely nothing like what I'm doing. Now it's certainly evolved completely you know I from a technical standpoint and then from an artistic standpoint, I have a pretty clear voice in my work. Now that I had no idea I was even going to want to have from the beginning. I said in the intro there and I read I. Think it was in you'll bile summer online. That's you looking to overcome troubles in your life. What kind of troubles are you trying to escape for a more to hide or to mask? Well at one point, I was very heartbroken and you know kind of depressed about that and I couldn't seem to make that feeling go away. And I certainly didn't want anybody else feeling that way. So I thought, you know the feeling isn't going away I might as well move forward with my life and just do what I can. So the least I can do is create artwork that brings a sense of calmness and peacefulness to the world. So that's where my focus was I didn't want anyone else to feel bad. So why make depressing work? So I may stuff that sort of light and escapism. Just to give people a few minutes to sort of escape from the world and get lost in something. Beautiful. Like that. Do. You feel like you're doing that when you In images that Ukraine today. Actually, you know I got through the last like four years or so I really worked through that situation and And really happy now and very fulfilled and find sometimes it's harder to make artwork when unhappy and distracted with other aspects of my life. Yeah. So have you actually noticed a difference in your photography now that you're actually feeling happier I do yeah I really do a lot of its storytelling has most all of my images are based on stories and just the stories themselves have changed. So the focus of what I'm doing has changed and now I'm working on a project that isn't even based on on a story that revolves around me in my life. It's sort of a whole separate set of photographs and I'm excited about that. I'm excited about doing something that's different. So

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