Australia, Wilford Brimley, Liberal Party Newfoundland discussed on Q

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Realize this this is the first time in check this out twenty six years. eight federal elections that we're in the middle of a campaign and you're not on the air what's a what's it like to sit this one out well not really sitting it out I'm still ranting on just doing it my television instead of on the the neighbors may have filed a noise complaint. it's a it's really interesting you know its when you cover politics you're obviously inside the bubble and even when I wasn't on television if it had an election happen to fall in a time that I wouldn't be on television I would go to maclean's magazine or or some outlet to just get me out there because I was desperate to get out on the road and and covered so it's it's obviously very different but but I'm finding the election fascinating like I usually find elections are you missing at all other times we should get on TV and then flip out about something I guess so I mean at the beginning of the election the conservatives posted a meme that had me saying vote conservative and I thought wow I really wish I had a show this week I didn't say that. and it would have been that would have been fun to have a way to correct that but yeah I miss it it is a must be funny to be sort of that that must've been interesting for you to be off of television and still be sort of part of the political discourse as sort of a symbol by another party well it just came as a surprise I guess because I started getting well I looked and I was trending on Twitter and I was like and my dad. trending on Twitter is often very bad. trending on Twitter and it was because of this mean and I guess I was flattered to a certain extent that they thought Hey that that would you know maybe move some votes but I was more it more baffled that they thought they could get away with that right because I think throughout your career I've always seen you as somebody who is been less a directive about who to vote for and more about voting you've you're strongly believe in in the act of voting I I've never ever told anyone how they should vote but on the show we did a lot of work we got involved with the vote mobs which were really exciting and they were truly non parties and they took place in every province and territory and you know like sixty campuses lots of students coming out and you know those were such exciting demonstrations and you very rarely saw liberal signer ninety peer conservative a green it was always surprised we're voting we're voting we're voting and that's all the parties because the young people were just saying they were voting and obviously I find it it's something up I'm very passionate about I think that you know I always voted now I had an interest in politics from an early age more so say that my brother and sister but they also always voted and I think why is because my parents voted and more importantly they took us to vote and I think anyone who's listening if they're going to vote. if at all possible if instead of just stopping in after work and voting if they can go home get the kids and then take them to vote I think that makes the world of difference I think I think absolutely I'm not surprised because I remember I remember going to my my dad going to vote in the Saint Matthew's Jim in St John's Newfoundland short picking me up from school a pick me up from home and take me to to vote that was an important thing to do everything you got to wear street shoes in a gymnasium in a school. pretty X. that mean that that right there is pretty exciting what do you think it is that keeps what do you think it is the keep young people from voting well I think there is a little bit of that like it's I think if you're a young person and you don't have the example of people who vote you don't have the people talking about it you it's it's intimidating you don't you don't necessarily know how to go about voting and if it's not something that's behavior that you know you've witnessed you it's easy to fall to the cracks but we also know that voting is it's learned behavior and it's addictive if people boat if and the numbers are there like if if an election happens and there's a bunch of eighteen year olds and they vote their voters for life that's why I actually I'm I believe the voting age to be sixty. I know. people never know what to think about let's talk more about that tell me how you were you arrived there the voting age we join the Canadian military and go overseas you probably won't get sent overseas but you can certainly join the army at sixteen you can jot drive farm equipment we expect you to follow the laws of the land and to understand them do you know sixteen year olds have responsibility I also think that it would be very exciting imagine if everyone in grade twelve vote yeah. that would be very excited how would that change how do you think how do you think that would change how the politicians talk to young people or even the tests that they might actually talk to young people when was the last time you saw. I usually see them on commercials during the price is right you know yes in the Wilford Brimley trying to talk to me about diabetes and like that so what but. what what what would that change with the with the voting well I I think that I think that sixteen year olds I think they would. but the chance to vote I believe and like I say it's habit forming and if they vote then they'll vote four years later and then you have them I don't know anyone who I thought the panel on first time voters was very interesting and when I heard there was a a panel of first time voters I was hoping it wouldn't be all eighteen nineteen year old right I was really glad to hear that there was you know a gentleman who's thirty two because I think there are very few and far between I think if you haven't voted and your thirty you're probably never going to vote so we got to get them young you you mentioned that you're you you had a brother and a sister who weren't as politically engaged as you they're gonna be so mad they're gonna be like we were engaged. we watched John Newman yeah I. what happened to you man but what happened to you that that that you're in a politics when you're like seven years old everyone else is watching dynasty and you're watching I had a I had a godfather who is my father's best friend who I liked because he would talk to me like I was. not seven or ten and I just liked him very much you know he was one of my favorite adults and he ran for the Liberal Party Newfoundland and then no he ran to the conservatives and then I think he crossed the floor within two days. red for the liberals and was this rated and then he ran for the leadership of both parties he was what we call local color. but he was a great great influence on me and so also dad would drag me down to these rallies where we would be chanting his name and I found it all very exciting when did you realize that you were better suited to comment on politics and you were actually running them themselves thank you must be approached like must happen yeah although I've never you know I think if you cover politics you always had this fantasy that it's like a politics is your baseball you have the status you're gonna get this phone call to going to become the general manager of the blue jays or something like finally I'll go in there but I don't know if I've never really considered running for public office I think I would like to. I I admire people who do it later in life actually when they're sixty or something yeah I I'm not that impressed with these people who not that I don't think there should be young people in politics but not that impressive all of these you know lifetime politicians like at nineteen they're working in a local constituency office and they're just looking for a place that they can run and then that's it they're in there for like twenty five years I think that you need life experience maybe work in a cafe or something yeah working working a job do the job of the people that you're representing so investors let's go back to it what what made you decide that you have you had a proficiency for maybe commenting on I loved I just I love politics I love the effect it had on people and I loved commentary because my father would drive me to a soccer practice on Saturday mornings and no one could talk because his father would go on CBS radio and due out like a song about politics and then dad's head would pop off. he was rex Murphy known and I thought wow you know you can you talk about politics people get really worked up I also believe politics matters and I and I want good people to run that I want and they should be held accountable so I always love the fact that I had a format to talk about politics on a weekly basis so how do we do it what what's what's your solution and we talked a little bit about lowering the voting age but how do we get I mean the kind of what we're here for how do we get more people voted and voting engage the democratic process we were talking about this backstage a moment ago you know in Australia you have to vote and they don't find that strange like it's a very radical concept here but you know it's been going on in Australia for so long and and if you don't want to vote like say your jobs witness or something you can fill out a form you don't have to vote so if you have real reasons why an actual objection consciences yes can you can you know you can avoid voting but one I would certainly entertain that because you know we all understand that none of us want to do jury duty but we get that it is our responsibility as citizens right and we all get that and we accept and we accept that we have to use red lights and we don't run red lights and we there's all sorts of things that are we are required to do as citizens so why not be required to actually take five minutes out of your day every four years and have a say.

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