Ut La, Kcrw, Senate discussed on Morning Edition

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Of opening up the people's government. So that they can be served by the agencies of government on which they rely Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says he won't bring the bills to a vote in the Senate following yesterday's sharp losses on Wall Street. Stocks are higher this morning in the moments after the opening bell. The Dow was up three hundred thirty nine points. This is NPR news from Washington. Good morning, six thirty one. I'm Eric Roy in for Terry Glazer with California headlines from KCRW with Los Angeles public school set to strike in less than a week their union now says they're willing to return to the bargaining table. And a session is tentatively set for Monday. But his case he had abused. Any Hamill reports. I'm meeting is about the only thing that L USD officials and the union seem to agree on if the two sides meet Monday that'll be the same day students at LA unified returned to school after winter break and just three days before the strike date. UT LA, which represents more than thirty thousand teachers released a statement officially rejecting the school district's latest bargaining offer. Adding that their bargaining team is available to meet, quote, if the district has a legitimate and clear offer for us to consider in response district officials welcomed the unions offer to negotiate but both sides of criticized the other this week, and it's not clear what if anything has changed in the stalemate over charter schools class size in staffing. The school district has agreed to a six percent raise with back pay, but UT LA leadership. Also wants the district to tap into its nearly two billion dollar reserve to reduce classroom sizes and at librarians counselors and nurses on school campuses for KCRW. I'm Jenny handle. Meanwhile, L U S D lawyers are seeking a court order to force teachers to continue to educate students with disabilities of a strike occurs. The LA times reports the district is seeking the order based on a state law that dates back.

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