Los Angeles, Jodie Foster, Niagara Falls discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

But and then also, so all of this stuff starts to fold into itself because then you realize, or you know, the other element came to that is it's a movie about bunch of people who are physically trapped in this hospital by a riot outside and and by incoming forces. But it's a movie about people who are trapped emotionally than show these characters is of trapped in grief. Waikiki. The stone k. brand character is trapped in a kind of a bee's of relationship with his Bank brother suddenly became, I suddenly realized that actually the backdrops in each room could represent the world outside they can't get to and that them brew like a whole other layer to it. Similarly, the Niagara suite which has a giant mural of Niagara Falls ends up being the the, the room where I placed the scene. Kind of mid point in the movie. Jodie Foster's character breaks down and we and we learn about, you know, the back story of tragedy. And suddenly you have this giant also full in a scene where your character is shedding tier. And this just something about the way those two things then start to talk to each other. That makes it more vox of isn't as an image. And so that's the way all of this starts to. That's the congealing process. When when you when bits of your movie start talk to other bits of your moving. And Shane always says something actually shame blacker we says the the act of making a movie by necessity the production of a movie kind of Bland's out the flavor of a film. What you have to do is put the the most complementary flavors in the pot from the beginning in order to end up with a richness. And I totally believe that because, and you know, and that's what happened with with artists is just like one idea leads to another, and then they start to help each other in the same thing happens with the characters and and also like you find movie as your imperfection with as well. For the longest time, the Wolfgang character the essentially the mob boss was Russian because I, the movie essentially in two thousand fourteen. And as the years went on a Russian Bagai though precedent in writing and actually the reasonings rushing because because of London, you know the the interesting thing that happened over the last fifteen years of kind of like all agog many starting to, you know, to take over various sections of London. I was light with. That could definitely happen in LA, you know, certainly kind of ten years from night, the Russian threat became way too. Obviously prescient with the American election, you know, the Russians took took over in a in a much more deeply intrusive way than just being kind of MLB Bossie buys buildings. And so suddenly that was the idea felt Don certainly felt done for a movie. That would be I in two years and was based ten years from now, but I started to the movie had started to take on a life of its own when it came to Los Angeles. I basically started pouring more and more of references to Los Angeles and very much to become in the lineage of of LA crime fiction, light challenge LA and also just LA are in general everything from to live and die in LA too high, talk -fornia by the eagles kind of all that gilded cage. Aspects of LA crime fiction had kind of played into it. And I was like, well, I'm gonna need to reinvent this mob boss and. His son who both very important antagonist in the movie hyphen. I lean into the LA of on, and I had this idea which which is actually kind of based on kind of David Geffen. Those a really interesting thing that happened at the light in the late sixties where the counterculture, which was thriving in Los Angeles. You know the music scene in particular. Basically, there were figureheads moved in monetize it and you know, you can kind of see the often people date it to the kind of post Altimonte cynicism the took over. I love the idea of a mobile suit, you know, came to LA as a young man, and because of the burgeoning drug scene realize that this was a thing that he could make money out of, you know, in.

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