Chino, David Chang, California discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

You're like, okay, I gotta tell I gotta ask something of Latino USA. So what was the question? So the question that I wanted to try and figure out was how do other Asians identify coming from Latino background? My name is David Chang. And I grew go into Chinese Emerson school and speaking Spanish at home. Tino in Latin America, a lot of people that are are called chino. You know that could be from Creon backgrounds. It could be from Japanese backgrounds. They could be from a number of different Asian backgrounds, but they're still considered chino and growing up. I think I heard that word a lot both in Latino communities that grew up around friends from central America, South America. I also grew up in California. So I look Filipina, and I would just by my own family members be called Gino or just in the streets of L A B called Gina. My name's Christie Ozorio. I was born in Los Angeles to a Filipino and Salvador, Ian couple, I actually asked my mom about this. I was like, so what do you think about this? And she's the Filipina and she's like, oh, yeah. She no that's just a cute way of saying like Asian girl on Mike. Okay. Cool because you know, I get called chino. And she's like what you're not Chinese. I don't get it. Like, how do you really feel about this? I mean, personally for me, I think growing up in California a lot of people have really embraced it. Like, I ride by this car every single day that has she need though as a giant sticker on the back of the car. So I don't know you have to put it in context. And it's all about like intent to someone's trying to use that word derogatory towards me. I'm like, I'm not feeling it. But if someone wanted to just call me a Cina because it's an term of endearment than I'm all about it. So Bubalo you were a contestant on the moon show. Master chef Latino putting these misleading. In fact, I let go see the muster shipped Latini, and you had your own experience with this term genome. So tell us what that was when I'm public him. I was born in Argentina, my parents were both Korean and I moved to the states in two thousand I've been living here ever since this was about a year ago. And we were in Miami Goto. Brought to his brother racing. People are just referred to me as it, you know. And I'm like case like, it's cool. But you guys don't really know me all that much. When you don't know me. And you just me just because it's the easiest thing for you those like I kinda take offense to that. I think I've come to feel over the years that as long as I am not reduced to one unique characteristic of my appearance. I'm actually okay with it. But then again, it really comes back to the relationship with that person. Can I ask you guys? How often have you sat around and had conversations about being letty? No Latino and Asian the first conversation if anything was with my parents because they were the ones that kind of had to street in a lot of things. Hi, my name's Sophie Khan. I am bicultural and bilingual, and bisexual, and my parents are Mexican Pakistani. And I am all of that. I didn't really realize what I was until I had a babysitter that what you know. A lot of my babysitter's were either black Regan and on. So you can imagine what my Spanish sounded like like, mommy, you'll get all those phone you'll get and so. Like, what are you getting to sponge from and I'm like well. Yeah. That's that's that's how talked knowing. She's like, no me. Ha she's like, then it wasn't until later like this. She explained she's like, no, you're you're babysitters Puerto Rican, and you were Mexican and Pakistani. So let's talk a little bit about the multiplicity of identity and how you guys kind of live with that. So David you've talked about, you know, when you go to Peru, which is your parent's homeland being Chinese for you is essentially just being Peruvian because it's pretty common. Correct. But when you come back to the United States, you're Peruvian side, basically disappears in everybody just sees you as Chinese I grew.

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