COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

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Phasers covert vaccine to the public, including a required storage temperature you'd find in the coldest places on Earth. CBS is Dana Jacobson continues our SYRIZA racing to a cure. As drugmakers move forward with their covert vaccine rollout. Theo Iceman Cometh as in the dry ice man. They're taking anything they could fit in the box right now. Mark seven, or from Acme Dry ice in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Never thought I'd be saving lives. But it feels really good holder than Antarctica in winter. Dry ice made from carbon dioxide or CEO, too, is crucial for moving and storing these vaccines fighters. Vaccine needs to be kept at 94 degrees below 0 F. Riots helps maintain the sub arctic temperature during shipping. Fizer even developed a thermal shipper. They call a cool box for the trip. It's a super box about the size of like a carry on suitcase. Tanya Alcorn is a Fizer supply chain executive nurse dry ice that goes around it, and then it has actually a device within it that has a continuous GPS and temperature monitor. Each cool box contains a minimum of about 1000 vaccine doses, a huge challenge for rural communities. With no place to store them. I don't think anybody wants to give a message that rural Wisconsin rural America second class Tim size represents 43 rural hospitals in Wisconsin. If you can ship 1000, you can ship to hundreds more expensive, that's more cumbersome. Brought it allows world to be getting vaccinated at the same time, urban so getting vaccinated. Visor Visor told told us us they they are are working working to to ensure ensure equitable equitable distribution, distribution, which which is is just just one one of of many many challenges. challenges. Right Right now now we we know know that that frontline frontline health health care care workers workers will will be be among the first to get the vaccine. But according to a recent Gallup poll, Margaret on Lee 58% of Americans say they would take it when offered to the general public. Dana Jacobson, Thank you.

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