Kimberly Adams, Jonathan, Justin Draeger discussed on Marketplace

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The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughter. There's the girlfriend. Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie, their jobs and me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery and we know that there were millions of people rescued eviction prior to the band Emmick, and that number has Only grown throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly. In about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I work, so I can open it and get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. Few research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're gonna operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that. This idea of being in the office five days a week, I think is a bygone air for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics says the company's She's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance, are planning to keep doing it after the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it that if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it, you're simply not gonna be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people and industries were working from home is possible, but they're generally the Americans who earn the most for.

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