Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln Douglas Debates, Stephen Douglas discussed on Ben Ferguson

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

The gaffes of yesterday, Joe Biden has called a lid on today, meaning no public appearances. No statements. He's trying to take the air. Out of the ball. When I was in high school. We engaged in something called Lincoln Douglas Debate. If your Children are considering Doing any sort of spoken word competition or Event. I would encourage you to do that. Because the more you do it, The better you get at it. Lincoln Douglas debate was based loosely on the format. That Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas used in their debate for the United States Senate. In the state of Illinois. There is a documentary that has been made entitled, Right makes Might this streaming on Fox nation right now. And the man who made that is Dr Ben Judge who is our guest. Dr. Judge tell us a little bit about this. I have not seen it yet, but I've read a review of what it's about. Tell us a little bit about it. Well, Michael thinks good to be with you. I You know it, we think and lot of Always thought it's it's particularly important debate, particularly important time in American history. Some of which for obvious reasons, But what the documentary covers is this period. In 18 58 in the lead up to that when This guy Abraham Lincoln is this Frontier lawyer. Not many people know about him outside of the state of Illinois. And he takes on The van who is considered the Most famous American politician at the time and the box. The man who many people think is going to solve the slavery problem once and for all, Stephen Douglas. And a lot of people think that Douglas is policy is going to be what unites the nation and Lincoln looks at it and says, Oh, no, this is going to be what ends up breaking the nation. This is going to be what undermines everything the nation was founded on And so the documentary tells the story. Of Him going on that journey of taking on the greatest political figure at the time and becoming The person we know today, Uh and that's that's the story of the documentary. Why? Why make this What What interested you about this? Why did you think people needed to know this? Show out of coming out of Claremont. You know, I was a product of Ah. Ah, student of Harry Jaffa, who wrote very famous book on the debates are a lot of people at the Claremont and Student and affiliated places. Study. Uh, Abraham Lincoln. We felt it was important now, so I've always always thought it was important. But why now? Is you've got the country. In a divided place, but also having a very serious conversation. About what How you define rights. How you define what is right. How do you define what is wrong? And how do you define the rights that every individual as a human being has. We're having a lot of discussions about that right now whether it's defined based on group Whether it's defined based on other factors. And probably the most serious, the most important debate that we have ever had in American history on that question. Is the Lincoln Douglas Debates. Interesting. It's It was fascinating to me, having done Lincoln Douglas debates and on a basic, cursory review in high school and then getting to college and understanding. That Lincoln I lost that election as he had been losing before and goes on to be elected president. But to understand that his great role for which he is remembered prior to the presidency isn't an election that we forget. He lost. Right, right. Yeah, And you know something about that. It's it's ah. It has ah, linked to today. What makes Lincoln A well known figure throughout the country. Yes, it's the quality of his. Ah! Peaches. Yes, it's it's the forcefulness of his argument. But the reason anyone is seeing that is because of the technological revolution occurring at the time. With the railroads with the telegraph. This was the first time that someone in the Midwest that you and that you in Ah, New York or South Carolina. Could read the speeches of a politician in Illinois in a place that was Not close to you Not close to a local paper. Um This is the first election where you really saw that. So Lincoln you know, we say on the documentary and hold by Lincoln in a lot of ways is that first mass. Media Political star is the first one to really take advantage of the changes in technology to propel himself. To become the most prominent Republican and ultimately the Republican nominee in 18 60. There is a quote in the film that I read from Professor Lucas Morale of Washington and Lee. The American people were beginning to lose the language of the founders, they were beginning to lose a way of speaking about themselves as fellow citizens. It reminded them of their common purpose, their common humanity and their common possession of individual rights. Today. We don't hear that language very much. So 80 years into the nation's founding, they were already conscious conscious that Lincoln's era was already conscious that we are losing that which brought us together from colonists to Americans from Virginians to Americans. And boy is that ever relevant to where we are today? That's right. And it tells you the importance of American history. You can't You know, American history isn't simply a subject to be studied. It's the fabric that actually grounds. How we understand ourselves as citizens. And as human beings in this country. We have a great founding, but to appreciate it to appreciate all that. You can't just pay lip service to it. You have to think seriously about the ideas that informed it and how those inform your own time because and winking Love. Professor Morel brings this up and Lincoln understood this Europe. You're only ever one generation away. Um That's the real lesson. I think of Ah, Lincoln's time and it's obviously very applicable Dar's well, he said. You go from The mindset of the classroom will be the mindset of your government in one generation, And it's true howto folks find this Then they goto they go to vaccination vaccination dot com I and It's right there..

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