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Ira Plato, Galileo, Scott Shepherd discussed on Science Friday

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Ira Plato, Galileo, Scott Shepherd discussed on Science Friday

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2 years ago

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Age. Listener's support w. NYC studios. This is science Friday. I am IRA Plato later in the hour. We'll get the recipe for a fourteen thousand year old pita bread, which has one very unconditional ingredient. But first when Galileo, I saw Jupiter through a telescope, he noticed stars hanging around the planet. And as he watched those stars night after night, he realized they were orbiting the planet. We now know these stars are Jupiter's moon. I o Europa Ganymede Callisto and since Galileo's discovery astronomers have found dozens of moons around Jupiter. And now this week they've added twelve more bringing Jupiter's moons total to a whopping seventy nine and here to talk about the discovery is Scott shepherd. He's an astronomer at the Carnegie institute for science. Have questions about Jupiter's moons are. Number eight, four, four, seven, two, four, eight to five five. You can also tweet us at sei fry. Welcome to science Friday. Thanks, thanks. How unexpected is this finding. I wasn't too unexpected because our survey were doing a survey. It's considered deepest largest survey for outsourcing objects or trying to find things beyond Pluto. But Jupiter happened to be in our fields as well in March of twenty seventeen. And our survey can cover big area of sky and co can go deeper than other surveys have in the past. So we expected we could turn up some new moons because we have an advantage over others that came before. So you're saying that you didn't sit down originally two to two point, your telescope Jupiter, but it happened to be there. So why not take advantage? Yeah. Yeah, we knew we knew we do our survey every few months throughout the year, and we knew in March twenty seventeen Jupiter would be near where we are looking. So we decided to make sure Jupiter was in the center of our field. So he could search for moons at the same time where search for very distant things and source them saying, you know, they were moons and that's a master another gigantic space rock. And what is a moon defined as anyhow? Yeah. As actually a pretty long process..