David Harsanyi, Larry Summers, Muller discussed on The Steve Deace Show

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

And I honestly I got bored of doing there were so many predictions that didn't come true about how the economy was going to just fall apart. How people going to die like you say Larry Summers. How how you know, the the only the rich we're gonna get a tax cut people in big states can get tax cuts not true either. So it's just it was completely wrong. But let's be honest. This is just sort of the default position out. No matter what happens. It's always the end of the world when whether comes to leaving the Paris accord, leaving you know, Iran deal of you know, the tax cuts healthcare policy. It doesn't matter. It's always people going to die because Republicans want to kill them for some reason. And it never comes true. And then they just repeat the cycle over and over. Over again, David Harsanyi is our guest here on the blaze. He's with the federalist. So let's look at this from the other side, you know, and one of the things I try to encourage our audience to do is sometimes a straw man is drama. If it looks like a duck quacks like right sometimes a construct is a construct. But a lot of times the things that we we turn into Stroman and construct s-, aren't they may be affectively or factually that, but they're not intentionally or purposely that mean, they set out to be those things that they may they may self parody themselves into that corner as you, and I've just been itemizing, but from their perspective, they think they're putting forth legitimate discourse here, sometimes so what would be let's look at it from their point of view. Why do they believe these things? I mean, why in fact, let me put a finer point on David. Why do you think they would say they believe things like this? First of all, I don't think everyone believes I think they're cynical politicians cynical columnist who sort of throw this out there because some people do believe it. Why do they believe is because they wanna believe it? It's a matter of blind faith in. I don't think it's a specific policy either. Meaning I think that generally they try to create a perception overall that all these things together, our, you know, our nihilistic that Republicans the poor, and it's not just about one specific policies. Some it's sort of a mantra that they need to repeat no matter what's going on. And our politics have done a lot more emotional. Meaning when I was young you could see someone like Ronald Reagan come around in convince a lot of people that his policies were better than you can win forty something states. And so on today. I don't think that's possible. I think partisanship has become much more ingrained in people and people have much more rigid. So even when they see evidence undermining their claims, they don't believe it. I mean, you know, Muller considers. Collusion you could quote him. But that won't stop people from saying that, you know, Donald Trump colluded with Russia doesn't matter what people say to just continue to believe the things they want to believe in. It's like it is like blind faith, people have in in in religion or G. And it's you know, it's something that's a little different. I think than we've been seeing in America for the last year or we've been seeing something different for the last decade than we did maybe for hundred years before that historically when this occurs. This dynamic that you just described historically when this occurs in a culture, it is similar to a divorce in a marriage. It's a win win. You cease looking. That doesn't mean you're never frustrated by your partner..

Coming up next