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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

And what is up I'm your host Elian Horn welcome back to the talk house podcast last month battles Ian Williams and Lee Rinaldo Sonic youth parts in in one track not to separate stroh it's okay it's in Chinese how are you going to do these live with you know this is one thing that work out I'm sure three weeks figured out yeah I'll tell you funny story when I was doing one of my first tours for my last record we were like a month away from the tour and I still didn't have a drummer and I didn't really know what to do about this and there's this place out in Jersey City called Mono- contemporary it's like an art center and there's a a magazine called Tom. Tom Is a magazine for female drummers and they were having an event there where they had all these girls with drum kits like setups throughout this like six story building and out on the lawn and everybody was doing these different drum things all day long and I found my drummer for this tour there this girl named Chloe Saavedra and we were walking into all these different rooms and there were all these drummers playing and doing Sir Solo Solo Drums and and it was the end of the day the end of the afternoon and we were on the sixth floor or something we walked into this room and like all the rooms artworks and stuff and like somebody with a drum kit and this girl that ever met before was was playing drums in this room and like she was good she was obviously quite talented and at one point she got up and started like walking around the drum kit and like playing like this and then at some point she got up onto the bass drum stood on the bass drum and was like playing it and stuff and I was like Oh that's pretty cool and like we we left the room and I was like what am I doing she's standing on the bass drum this is my drummer and like I wrote her an email the next day I was like I Are you standing on the Bass Drum I'm leaving for Europe in three weeks do you want to come on tour and and let's like she did it and it was it was it was awesome and she stood on the bass drum every night and it was S. incredible she's got a bad with her sister called chaos chaos and they're doing really cool stuff they she moved to La. She's I have a history of getting really awesome drummers and then having the move to La so you know tickets to success so are you a you're the type who likes to master a few things really well or the type who likes to experiment with a lot of things and sort of things like what I don't know I always thought that I am better not really master of anything and that I'm better tat sort of being a beginner at a lot of things because it's like the Zen Archer archery thing start off you have B- beginners luck yeah and then you kind of enter a huge slump of mediocrity for years and then at the end you're a master I I've never really gotten to that point so I just I just do a lot of starts well I have to say my friend rule that I work with he's a master of of things he's really an amazing producer and he's incredible with all the electronic machines and everything and I think I'm more like conceptual guy and delirious assist I guess although I do say that as with my last record a lot of the lyrics on this new record are collaborations with my friend the author Jonathan Lethem this is the second record we've done together we're we're collaborating on lyrics for different songs and that's been interesting you know the lyrics are a big part of this record for me and rolls really encouraged me to sing more like for the last record when we were out on toured like it really became more of a a vocal process for me on this record that's kind of continued and the idea of writing lyrics with someone else has changed the whole concept of how you write lyrics you know they're less personal this record as a lot. The lyrics are a lot more collage Jonathan on me stuff from he lives most of the year in Los Angeles area and he would send me lyrics in some cases having heard some of the tunes and in other cases just sending me very lines and I was doing a lot of collage with the lyrics on this record like putting six different pages out on the music sand some some his mind and just kind of like pulling ends here and there and seeing what worked in building them up more on the level of just like the way the vocal fits the music rather than the meaning of the of the words innocence but all kind of would keep everything together he's he's really a master of all the studio stuff so you know he was holding that part down and letting me do my thing yeah because you about instruments and you're associated with guitar but a lot of ways your instrument is the concept yeah I mean you play the concept yeah in a way for this record like we we have a lot of key Russian instruments vibes and Marimba and drums and things and that's besides the electronics that's that's the main thing we were playing you know one of us would do it because whatever we did mostly getting caught up in the in the computer after we were laying it down and there were there were a couple places where there's you know there's a bunch of acoustic guitars and a little bit of electric guitar but it's really not a good KTAR heavy record at all it's yeah I mean we're looking to move into another area in a way one time a heavy metal guitars told me that he plays his amp and not as guitar and I was like and then after that I thought I play my strings but not my Qatar 'cause I had come up with my own spot well in Sonic youth we used to call it guitar amp action the guitar especially with Electric Guitars Electric guitars nothing without the APP so the chain from the guitar and the pickups to the APP like we recognize data as the instrument in a way that you know it wasn't just about the the Les Paul stratocaster or whatever it was about this chain between the guitar and the APP so we'd call it guitar amp action that's what we played you you wrote some questions yeah I did it's bad form it's totally gone I'm not checking my email I like it I like it I'm you know I'm on instagram now I did ride got some questions do you like the cars did you because Rick Okay suggest died yesterday we've lost a bunch of the Daniel Johnson a friend of mine poets did we had a thing with Daniel Johnson especially in the early as we kind of were really fascinated by his records but the cars I was in school when I first started probably old enough that year like yours already a cool guy well cars were gateway ban for a lot of ten year olds for two new wave yeah yeah yeah whereas like you you were probably Kazak one Nevada went big time for me I was already old enough that I was kind of like you know come suspicious I was like why why all these kids like Nirvana but you know when I was starting to get serious about playing music it was when all those American punk bands were happening well but after like you know there was the sexy missiles and the ramones but we were really into talking heads and television and Richard Hell and the voids and I was living in this town called Binghamton New York and there was a girl living in my house and one day she brought home this record by this new wave band called the cars and like it's kind of like the archie to us in a way but all those songs it didn't seem to have the seriousness of like the New York bands and it was from Boston no okay it had this Boston thing going on and and but but you know those songs all have such staying power like especially the first a couple of records I mean those songs are are amazing and you know but it wasn't what I was listening to at the time except on the radio songs all over the radio with good reason oh speaking of television and talking heads the guy from liquid liquids on the new battles record I know I heard this south Principato yeah yeah the the creator of one of the most sample baselines in history maybe yeah yeah bylines right that was first sampling on what was the liquid liquid song called that was well he's there to hit hit cavern was that cabin one or the other one there was another one I were around they were called liquid idiot and I I remember seeing them like at some say three years yeah yeah and then they became liquid liquid and they put out they were records label that a little bit they were on nine nine records that had put out blend because record on a bunch of records this record store in Soho in the late seventies early eighties that was putting out like local artists when there were an indie records or in record labels or anything sales like a real New Yorker it seems like because I bet in the seventy s when New York was dangerous and unsuccessful if you're successful people like ambitious like I'm GonNa make people I I don't I don't know you tell me I mean 'cause now New York's one of these international destinations so like people from everywhere but it seemed like back then like people from Long Island or New Jersey but like it wasn't there were no record labels there were no magazine's coverage enough he was just like you were just playing for your friends ah axes or wherever it was there was no way to get that music out no rolling stone wasn't covering it nobody was covering that music you know and in a way the stuff that liquid liquid and es was another nine nine ban that kind of broke through those three three girls from the Bronx that that those records were were really raising and they were being played in the early Disco Dancer Teary on Hurrahs in in the early eighties when when that scene was kind of coming on strong those those clubs weren't playing noisy sonic user swans but they were those records were more like a divide like culturally between like the people who would like the to dance he replaces and the people that went to well noisy place you know the both you know the stuff that was coming out of the Bronx early hip hop we were really into that it was brand new and fresh and what we were doing was to the I mean there wasn't really a divide on our side because we loved all that music but I think probably nobody making those records up in the Bronx we're listening to lower Manhattan noise they weren't listening the teenage Jesus and the jerks or or DNA or whatever but to us it was like.