Jeffrey Epstein, Michael Alex, Jeffrey Epstein Party discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

He was clearly a sociopath. And I'd never met a sociopath before. Now, a lot of times we'll read these, you'll take a BuzzFeed quiz. Are you a sociopath? And it's like, oh, my feelings weren't hurt when I was mean to someone. It's not a thin line between me and you and him. It's a thick thick line. Because when you're talking to someone like that, at least in this specific case, he was being very friendly. He wasn't, and it's not like he was going to kill anyone or as a threat to me. But there's that sense like something's really off here. And he was talking to me about how after he had killed angel, he would just talk about it because he felt so much guilt. He just wanted to get caught. It's like, no, no, no, he was describing wasn't guilt. He was describing just he didn't like the knife over his head, like waiting to get caught. I'm like, you don't even know what guilt is. So it was kind of like, oh, wow. So as for Jeffrey Epstein but the thing is Michael Alex is in a very low social position. And the thing is when someone is powerful, very high status and they do something, we are as kind of hierarchical animals. We kind of defer to their norms. So if you're at a party with let's suppose, either of us, and it's like a Jeffrey Epstein party. And everyone at the party is doing some sort of weird drug we've never heard of. We wouldn't really feel comfortable judging them because their norms kind of become the norm for that space. The lesson for me about Jeffrey Epstein is a lot of them because I think to me the biggest moment was the Amy rohrbach situation. Amy robach was caught on a hot mic saying that they had all the goods on him. They had all the names. And that Buckingham Palace call them. They killed a story because they weren't going to get a Meghan Markle in an interview out of it. So that the willingness of those in power to do the wrong thing for the flimsiest pretext, I think was a big important lesson. Also the fact that no one at ABC had any consequences for this. In fact, the only person who got in trouble for all this was someone who used to work at ABC when to I believe CBS. And they got fired from CBS because apparently they had access to footage at one point, even though they weren't the ones who had leaked it. The whistleblowers are the only, for example, the case in Eric Garner, the guy who was selling Lucy cigarettes in New York City who was arrested, he had a heart attack or whatever it was on the way to jail. He died. The only person the cops had a situation. The only person who had gotten in trouble because of that was the guy filming it, like he went to jail. So I think there is a lesson in terms of look at Julian Assange, right? There's a huge amount of power exercised by elites to make sure that what is done in the cover of darkness remains in the cover of darkness. And also, Kevin McCarthy, who was currently the House minority leader, leader of the Republicans, he wrote a letter to ABC News, you had this guy, maybe you couldn't call him the authorities, but you could have leaked it to somebody..

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