Donald Trump, President Trump Stepien, Mike Morgan discussed on All Things Considered

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It's not just a line in his rally speeches. If you want to know a campaign's priorities look where they're spending their time and their money. Here's a telling example on Facebook, the campaign has poured nearly a million dollars in tow. Add since late September, using a page called Women for Trump. That's according to Bully Pulpit Interactive, a Democratic ad firm. Benjamin Clark is a partner Seems they're making a last minute plea for women votes. This's Florida, Pennsylvania, Georgia and North Carolina. All kind of must wins for the President. Trump is spending time and money in other states to Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Georgia. Some he barely eked out in 2016. Some he won easily but is having to work harder for this time. Meanwhile, the Biden campaign seems like they're on the air everywhere this week, running local ads in 19 states and spending millions during major sporting events. Trump is only advertising in 11 states and is getting outspent in most of them, according to the tracking firm at Analytics, Bill Stepien, Trump's campaign manager, told reporters. There's nothing to see here we very much like where we're at. We have more than sufficient air cover what you hear there is a man making the best of a less than desirable situation. The latest campaign finance reports show Biden with more than three times as much cash on hand is Trump. Which helps explain why the Republican National Committee is pitching in with ads in four swing states and Iowa aimed at senior citizens. Protect your Medicare coverage vote for President Trump Stepien says they have a secret weapon. Though more than 2.5 million campaign volunteers who connected with 10 million voters last week alone. We're actually running. A real campaign, you know, campaign with voter campaign with events. We like our plan was still knocking on doors. Still making phone calls were working the polls if it's pretty intense, A Del Amico is a super volunteer for Trump in Florida, putting in about 40 hours a week at this point I caught her on her cell phone driving between a pole watching shift in going to set up for an Ivanka Trump event with her towns Republican club Today. I called a bunch of members and I should look, we need to put up 1000 shares and you come out now and they go absolutely. Campaigns are always boasting about their volunteer armies there get out the vote efforts, and it's always impossible to tell if it's really is good as they claim. It's even harder to make comparisons now because of Corona virus. What is clear based on polling and where the candidates are trying to compete is Trump has a narrower path to victory? Or, as the president said in a recent rally, he has to run the table under dramatically different circumstances than he did four years ago. Tamara Keith NPR news Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented Ah lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control. The largest and now, second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where there Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they firmed roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep happening at times and in places.

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