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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

I'm John L. Hanson in junior and welcome to another addition of him black America on this week's program divided by design with the Honorable Mitch Landrieu former mayor of New Orleans in Black America. You know so you know. We took all that information and said you know what are we gonNa do and one of the things we WANNA do is set up of an organization that helps number one. Educate most Americans about what the real history of our country is so that they can begin to understand institutional racism which clearly exists. Secondly we are going to Use Art Music Culture Sports to help change those stores and bring people together. We're going to do. Is We want to help. Train leaders and communities about what an equity agenda agenda would look like how equality and equity of two different things. And that if you really mean that everybody should have an equal opportunity that you have to design systems to do it and effectively. The conclusion was big picture was that the country is the way it is because we designed it this way and if we're divided you know somebody designed it so that we can be divided and if we want at the beach gather we got a redesign. It we gotta fix what we broke going up in the politically active and socially conscious family. Ms Landrus political roots. Run deep in Louisiana. Lisi Anna Way served two terms as governor and sixteen years in the state legislature and eight years as mayor of New Orleans to this any as seen seen firsthand how segregation and racism as affected communities in this country and particularly in the south over the course of year. His team met with people where they he lived. They traveled to twenty communities across thirteen southern states. They visit diverse parts of the region geographically demographically and culturally along their journey they had discussions in many different settings from one on one interview to small groups and roundtables to focus groups to community listening sessions. The capstone of their research is eighteen. Hundred Person Survey across the stage. They visited the report title divided by designs. The cavs for discussion or how. The American south experience issues of race and class in their communities. Recently in Black America spoke with Mayor Landrieu born and bred New Orleans Louisiana. The Anna one of nine children. We'd be my brothers and sisters. We got thirty eight kids and been here my whole life. There was an idea. What was I going up in New Orleans with nine kids families? You got to get to the front of the line as fast as you can get there. It was a I lived in a in a great neighborhood. We played street ball all the time. came from a big family. You know born and raised the and it was just a just a Lotta fun growing up. It's hard once you grew up in New Orleans to live anywhere else. 'cause wait okay. I'm sure everybody everybody feels good about the neighborhood. Do they grow up in what we we had a good time. What was it about your family and politics? You know it's an interesting. My Dad was a was a poor kid. He didn't hardly Nichols Rub together. Did know anybody grew up in a house that was about eighteen feet wide and sixty feet deep and live right across the street from from a cemetery grew up in a store room of his mom. Is You know house where she was. selling stuff to folks in the neighborhood he got around. You know after I got out of law school. Who figured that he wanted to try to do something good and ran for office and you know from there the whole family? Has You know based on what my mom and dad's work has been been kind. Kevin Gage the public service. Now not all of my brothers and sisters are in elected office. But you know they. They have spent their time. You know kind of following the lead of trying to give back where they could. In in your opinion what makes New Orleans such a vibrant city and people want to visit as often as possible. Well you've been here. Yeah you know we were talking a little bit Before your daughter went to school here this is a we celebrate it out three hundred dollars bursary this year. We have always been a very diverse place rich culture. You know history is such that and this is part of one of the efforts. I'm working on it we were. We were a huge Originating spot for slavery in America we also had the influence of the French the Spanish German. It was because of bovine. History is sorted history in some parts glorious than the others it has been a melting pot. That's reflected the soul of the country very culturally rich culturally deep and it has just been a really interesting place to live. You know I like to think of losses At least reflecting both burst both both the best and the worst of America because I- diversity from the beginning has been Great strength and You know it's it's it's got. His problems bought thought. You know. It is very reflective of the full diversity of what we hope that. America's GonNa be one day we're new became mayor of New Orleans. The city was experiencing just after Katrina. Give us a snapshot of how the city has progressed. Since that time. Well everybody remembers. I mean if it's almost like when nine eleven hit you remember where you were. Most people remember where they were. When Katrina hit? I mean it was a defining moment for us because the whole city was destroyed. I mean we. We got beat to death by that storm. I mean literally. We lost eighteen hundred of our brothers and sisters and bothered fathers aunts and uncles and kids every physical structure in the city. Almost underwater seventeen feet of water for weeks. I mean we had to rebuild this thing from nothing and you know like when when you're in a tragedy you come together because you have to you know you you better you better find somebody that can lift you up. You're not GonNa make it and you better listen body else up. But they're not Michael Baker and out of that tragedy. The people of New Orleans you know had a common focus and we came together. We had to rebuild all of our schools. We rebuilt the hospitals. We're opening up a brand new airport Next week with the rebuild all of our schools and we had to get our feet back underneath us and so you know although it was a very tragic tragic moment in the city miraculously. I mean the people found a way to rise above lots of different things. That separate us and rebuild the city and so the city is doing really really well. Now it is. It's further along than I think. People expected it to be. I think people now can look at the complications in Puerto. Rico go on in other places. It's hard to come back when you get beat. You know by by a natural catastrophe like that you'll see these wildfires in California put some communities. He's on the back one of the interesting things about it and this is something that we've all known is that people had stuff before the storm had an easier time coming back then people. That didn't have stuff. You know. So generation wealth and resilient to the communities are all very much an important part of. You know making sure that that you're ready to come back and it's been a little bit uneven but you know the city if you came here you'd be surprised at how how much progress has been in the last thirteen years the sand obviously with the rebuilding of New Orleans. You had a team. Well who are some of the other individuals that one part of the city government that you leaned upon on to get advice and insight. Well the truth is and I'm not trying to be cute here but the answer is everybody in the the only way that the city could come back was by having everybody in the world and help us so we got huge numbers of a financial and philanthropic donations from other countries Um working with the president of the United States was really really important in his cabinet. Getting the state government the local government but on the ground down on the ground having the faith based Community Mutiti the not for profit community you know individuals at all wanted to help everybody in kind of deal and You know there was so many people it'd be hard to call out. I want to but literally as I was the one of the most blessing. Blessed things was no matter who restarted. The answer was always yes. And that's why New Orleans feel so thankful to the rest of the country for all that that you guys gave us and so you know we want people to come visit and see it you know. I think you'll be surprised. You know we're like any other big city in America we have challenges and that will be here before Katrina and we're trying to figure them out from housing. The transportation redoing the criminal justice system all of those things. We still have great challenges with. But we're better off than we were before the storm.