A highlight from Liu Draft

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Hi pre have. I'm so excited to be here with you. I know amy. I'm really excited to. Because i feel like it was just yesterday. You were in our office by one world trade And you were telling me your story and it was so so compelling so it's exciting. You're here with us today. 'cause you launched right before the pandemic started i sure did so amy before we get to your your founders where i would love to hear a little bit about your background because one thing you said to me the other day as you were very use to kind of being behind the scenes being the number two or number three at the various beauty companies that you worked at and i'm wondering how that all started how you got into this crazy wild beauty world. I think to start my So my dad. My mom and dad emigrated from taiwan to the united states and my dad was an entrepreneur. And i think. I really watched him in pursuit of the american dream. Really see what. It was like to be an entrepreneur. And i really wanted that for myself so from a young age. I really always wanted to be an entrepreneur. And i you know i went to business school and i kind of concentrated in entrepreneurship as well. So i am m pretty risk versus a person and i decided that the right thing to do for me to really learn on someone else's dime and that's exactly what i did. So i sought out founder based brands here in los angeles and prestige. Ones colors can care so Kate somerville Smash box has maddix choosy merrin and really all the companies. I went to went from bigger company to smaller company and my role kept getting bigger and the hope there was really that i just wanted to see what it was like to have a seat at the table and really see what it was like to be a founder and. I think it's so important to do that. Because the more the closer you can get to something more demystify and it became to make. The leap felt a little bit easier. 'cause i saw it up close and personal. Tell me a little bit about your time at kate. Somerville and josie morand specifically because those are both very big founder base brands. Their names were attached to those brands. And you were very close in building those brands for those women. So i was lucky enough to be the head of marketing at both those places so i did like you said have a very close relationship with both of them and saw what it was like to be a founder both the good parts of it and challenging ones and i think part of that is the reason why decided not to name the company. Amy lou cosmetics. I think it's really hard to be Founder facing in that way in heavier name on a product and the thing that i did learn from bat was that i wanted to be a founder. I could understand what was entailed. But at the same time i i didn't want to be so forward facing as a founder so tell me a little bit about when you did decide. This is what you were going to do. One of the things that i think is struck me so much about our twenty eight is one. It's clean color cosmetics which is a still a rarity in this in this market and to you know you weren't just talking about clean your ethos is about sensitivity and skin sensitivity which has become very important in in kovic land and cova livia. So tell me about how you kind of layered that in together so i think speak about the sensitivity part. I really have to go back to my my own personal story. So i've had like you said. I worked in the beauty industry for a long time now but as a backdrop to all of that i've also had eczema my entire life and for me i've had chronic eggs amount where i would wake up every day and really not know what my skin was going to be like so it presented itself on my hands on my face behind my my knees and i could wear went for periods of time not wearing only wearing jeans and long skirts. I wear anything that was shorter because people would stop me and ask me if something was wrong with me and i became really insecure about it to be honest with you. In addition to that working in the beauty industry made it feel even more complex. Because when your whole job is to sell aspiration you can kind of feel like a fraud.

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