Margaret Thatcher, Princess Diana, Prince Charles discussed on Travis Holcombe

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King and I'm David Greene. The new season of Netflix is drama about England's royal family. The Crown drops today, innit Gillian Anderson plays Margaret Thatcher and Emma Corrine is Princess Diana. Here's NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. As the crown's outstanding fourth season begins. It is 1979 and Margaret Thatcher is taking powers, the first female prime minister in British history At first Queen Elizabeth played with until IUs reserved by a Livia Coleman sees a potential ally and another powerful woman defending her to Tobias Menzies, Prince Philip. As they watch that you're on TV. Last thing this country needs what two women running the shop next Prime Minister. Perhaps that's precisely what this country needs. But then they have the first of many regular meetings to discuss government business. And the queen discovers Thatcher isn't exactly jumping on the train The sisterhood when she asked who will be in her Cabinet? I'm assuming they women Women. In cabinet? No, certainly not well, not just because there aren't any suitable candidates. But I have felt women in general tend not to be suited to high office. Why's that? Well, they become too emotional. I doubt we'll have that trouble with me. That's an excellent bit of foreshadowing because viewers will find the Queen's inability to express emotion and the tremendous impact it has on her family is one of the key storylines in this season of the crown. In fact, the season features two overarching, exquisitely told tales, Thatcher's rise and fall and the start of Prince Charles is marriage to Diana Spencer, the woman the world would come to know as Lady Diana. Marriage story reflects worst on Prince Charles, who was browbeaten into proposing to Diana despite being in love with the married Camilla Parker Bowles. In particular, Charles is swayed by a note written by his great Uncle Lord Mountbatten just before his death. Hear Mountbatten. This played by Charles Dance, My Dear.

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