Kqed, Donald Trump, President Trump discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

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Com and the listeners of KQED this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon president trump declared himself a law and order president and an ally of all peaceful protesters in the wake of George Floyd's death but he then criticized protesters these are not acts of peaceful protests these are acts of domestic terror the destruction of innocent life and the spelling of innocent blood is an offense to humanity and a crime against god as the president spoke police and troops used force to clear way nonviolent protesters outside the White House so the president could walk to a nearby church for a photo op a new poll from NPR PBS newshour Marist finds that two thirds of Americans say president trump is increased racial tensions following the death of George Floyd joining us now to talk about the poll is NPR's Domenico Montanaro dominical thanks so much for being with us Hey there's got things happening overall how do Americans view the protests you know they view them pretty positively I mean as a sixty two to twenty eight percent margin that people say that they view the demonstrations as mostly legitimate protests rather than mostly people acting unlawfully and by a similar sixty one to thirty one percent margin they view the demonstrations as more protests than right it's pretty much the same numbers and while a majority still have at least a fair amount of confidence in police in their own communities to treat black and white people equally that's down eight points from America pull from twenty fourteen there are predictably divides along party and racial lines if fifty nine percent of Republicans saying that they view the demonstrations as riots for example and how almost half of African Americans forty eight percent saying that they have very little to no confidence that the police will treat whites and blacks equally the medical have these attitudes towards protests changed over the years this is a huge finding I feel like in the poll that there's been this sea change really from the nineteen sixties when demonstrators took to the streets to fight for civil rights I took a look back at some of the poll numbers from Gallup and Harris and others and majorities in the nineteen sixties had an unfavorable view of civil rights demonstrations and they thought that they would actually hurt African Americans cause for racial equality for example in one poll question nineteen sixty three sixty percent of Americans have an unfavorable view of the planned March on Washington that's the same March on Washington that produced Martin Luther king junior's I have a dream speech and in nineteen sixty eight your member the unrest around the Democratic National Convention in Chicago majorities approved of the police's response and said that Chicago mayor Richard Daley then was right in his forceful use of the police against those demonstrators and that's just not what we're seeing today and of course America these protests to come along the same timetable is elections in November according to this poll what are American chain about the job president trump is doing you know president trump's approval ratings about where it's been it's at forty one percent but his disapproval rating we find is on the rise it's up five points from March to fifty five percent that's almost a record high of disapproval for president trump and beneath the surface is what's really interesting here almost half the country forty seven percent now says that they strongly disapprove of the job that president trump is doing that's the highest we've ever seen that kind of intensity of disapproval is just stunning most of that movement by the way is coming from independence they shot up ten points since March in their strong disapproval of the president and that's a group trump won in twenty sixteen but he's done really very little to reach out to them since becoming president and what could this mean for reelection well look we're five months away from the elections so you don't want to draw too many conclusions but right now trump is trailing former vice president Joe Biden the presumptive democratic nominee quite significantly trump is down fifty to forty three against Biden and you know at this point Bynes made a lot of inroads with some key groups white men older voters and significant gains with suburban voters in particular and for all the criticism that Joe Biden is faced from some corners on his policies on race he is winning eighty eight percent of black voters pretty much what Democrats have gotten in past presidential elections I am here to medical Montanaro thanks very much for speaking with us you're so welcome Scott this week federal prosecutors announced the arrest of three men who are allegedly part of the extremist boogaloo movement the group that seeks to bring about a civil war in America the criminal complaint claims they planned to bring Molotov cocktails to a black lives matter protest following the death of George floor besides their ideology one thing they had in common was that they were members of ability boogaloo group on Facebook HM mac has more on how this extremist movement is proliferating on that platform Attorney General William Barr cited this extremist movement Thursday as one that federal law enforcement is keeping an eye on there are some groups that want to bring about a civil war the blue group that has been on the margin of this as well trying to exacerbate the violence the three men arrested in Nevada were accused of trying to instigate violence between police and protesters there's a dynamic that's at work where they're trying to infiltrate the public anger over the killing of George Floyd and exploit it for their own advantage that's anti defamation league CEO Jonathan Greenblatt whose organization has been tracking this extremist movement some people involved in the movement are white supremacist but by no means all of them others involved with movement the majority are anti government and seek a conflict with the state with law enforcement and the ideological what they perceive to be the ideological left all three of those arrested by federal law enforcement were members of a blue Facebook group according to a criminal complaint NPR examined the Facebook profile of one of the suspects and found that he was a member of multiple Facebook groups relating to the boogaloo movement Joel Finkelstein is the director of the network contagion research institute which tracks hateful ideology online he says that Facebook has become a key place for members of the boogaloo movement to organize recruit and discussed communication strategies through the use of private groups in terms of a structure that allows these things to remain hidden I think it goes without saying almost that Facebook as far away one of the best kinds of platforms that you could have for that purpose Finkelstein said that as he and his team research these extremist groups Facebook began to advertise we were given targeted advertisements by the platform supporting the boogaloo in the form of shirts containing Google means hats military badges containing this kind of material Facebook said through a spokesperson that it had removed the accounts of the three men arrested the spokesperson said that in may the company had updated its violence and incitement policy to prohibit content related to the term Google when accompanied by depictions of armed violence it also said it was preventing these pages and groups from being recommended to others on Facebook critics argue that Facebook hasn't done enough to combat extremist content Daniel Stevens has the tech transparency project a group that seeks to hold large tech companies accountable he said that in April his organization released a report about how the boogaloo movement organizes on Facebook but Facebook didn't take serious actions Stephens argues thanks again take down these bigger groups they're all still available on Facebook now some of the groups have changed their names or have change managers are they done a you know a few small things to try to evade detection but essentially they're out there and all these people are gonna see on Facebook to this day and despite Facebook's pledge to stop recommending these pages Stephens said his teams are recommendations for Bukola groups on Facebook as recently as Thursday Tim Mackey NPR news Washington elected officials in Richmond Virginia the capital of the old confederacy have announced a plan to take on five Confederate statues on historic monument Avenue here's the mayor of Richmond lavar stony it's time to replace the racist symbols Russian inequality symbols have literally dominated our landscape with symbols that represent in some of the best in all of us the Richmond city council will have to give final approval to dismantle four of the monuments including the one of Jefferson Davis who was president of the confederacy but the largest the six story tall statue of Robert E. Lee stands on state property governor Ralph Northam is directed it be removed as soon as possible this announcement happened after daily demonstrations to Richmond against police brutality and racial injustice governor Northam signed a new law on April that allows localities to remove these types of memorials historian Julian Hayter is a professor at university of Richmond he was a member of the monument Avenue commission that made recommendations to the city two years ago about the statues thanks very much for being with us my pleasure the engineer remind us why the statues around because it it you know they were put up by officials in states that had after a loss to civil war correct right so these monuments are in many ways part and parcel of what we called the lost cause in the six hundred and some odd thousand people died during the civil war which is twice as many of the people that died the second World War and I think people have to make sense of that especially southerners many of them didn't know what the punishment was going to be for the civil war and I think the loss because the way to justify rationalize and make sense of their part in the confederacy and what many considered treason and what we begin to see over the twilight of the nineteenth century southern is coming up this kind of crafted apologies to rationalize not only the civil war but also slavery but even more importantly the rise of Jim crow segregation professor hater what what about the argument that is as reprehensible as what those statues might represent a you can't erase history and the best thing is to you know put up plaques that explain who those people really work or something like that yeah it's difficult to erase history however I think many Confederate statues stand without context and they are part of a much larger narrative the institutionalization of the loss because the belief that African Americans were happy slaves and unprepared for freedom that the civil war was about states rights not slavery that Confederate leadership were heroes a sizeable number of Americans still believe lost because talking points I think what people have resolved to do you is saying sure it's difficult to erase history but what history and what kind of false narratives are we willing to promote and let it linger do you think those monuments if they come down should go into storage go to some private collector or or be melted down I think if those monuments are put in a warehouse it is a squandered opportunity to deal with this false narrative that I that I continue to bring out the end this is just the beginning of a much larger movement to deal with all of the other manifestations in symbols of Jim crow segregation that continue to have an influence on the nature of southern cities Confederate statue weighs in the only route to the lost cause and and segregation we've got a public and obsolescence we segregated public school system in the city of Richmond we've got residential segregation in the compression of poverty that still affects the very fabric of the city it be wise to use these statues as a teachable talking points to to familiarize people with the kind of perpetuation of African American serfdom that characterize Jim crow segregation and those monuments into a trench so I think to be a wasted opportunity to put those things away in a warehouse or melt them down without telling the accounting area that finally begins to do its due diligence against the perpetuation of these terrible ideas as we mentioned you were part of that commission that made recommendations to the city and.

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