Could a Silicon Valley startup make geothermal heating cool?

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All this week. We're talking about how technology can help us. Adapt to climate change for our series. How we survive more. People are trying to figure out how to be energy independent to avoid unexpected power. Shut offs and use greener energy for some. It's as easy as drilling a hole. Geothermal energy systems let people heat and cool their homes using energy from the earth. The technology has been around for decades. It's incredibly efficient but fewer than one percent of homes in the us. Use it now. One startup wants to do for geothermal heating what tesla did for the electric car make it cool marketplace tech producers. Stephanie hughes has more when you're used to digging for gold and alaska it's a change in mindset to start working in suburban backyards us is all residential. We're used to virgin ground up in the middle of a swamp in the middle of nowhere that's daniel more. He and his brother zachary are professional drillers now. They installed geothermal heat pumps a lot. More careful and aware of our surroundings versus up there we could just run over the it was no obstructions out there. We were told in your way. Dr wright brothers are in pelham new york installing at geothermal system for the startup daniela energy. The company was born at ex. Google secretive incubation lab daniel off as its own company and is now trying to make it easier for homeowners to install these systems even if the backyard is tiny and the house is a century old that appealed to mike bio stein. Who bought his house last year when we moved in there with no insulation in the house like period. It was basically living in kind of a nice looking tent by elstein insulated and he also wanted to replace the oil burning furnace with more resilient heating system. His local utility offers incentives to homeowners. Who went to install geothermal which uses the earth deep underneath the house as a kind of battery. Thomas cronje leads operations. Dan dylan eucalyptus consistent fifty five degrees fahrenheit. Swell can in the winter. Use that to transfer heat from the ground to our loops and using our homes. Those lips are made of plastic tubes which daniel and installs by drilling down hundreds of feet. Water flows through the tube absorbs energy from the ground and transfers it to a heat pump which then causes it to heat or call the house. Getting that system in place is expensive on average twenty thousand dollars. Dan gives homeowners the option to finance that and they've installed hundreds of system so far kathy hanoun is the president and founder of dandelions the market size could not be bigger because every single building pretty much in the world heats in cool so that's one of the purposes of buildings starbucks was interested in getting dandelions systems into some of its stores and ambulant does want to expand commercial buildings eventually but noone says it's a lot easier to get one or two homeowners on board then everyone involved in a commercial real estate deal marketplace tech producer stephanie hughes

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