Donald Trump, White House, President Trump discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds
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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

I mean, maybe who knows, like I mean, look at how Scaramucci left, and now he's started back around sort of defending the president in weird ways. Sean Spicer didn't leave the happiest of terms he describes Trump is a unicorn like I wouldn't not like forever done, sort of deal with Trump's law the time. Right? It makes it absolutely impossible not only to believe in any individual thing. The White House says, but even to figure out why they're saying right, like they're clearly on defense for this particular news cycle on amaafuza. Do they have a greater strategy beyond that? Are they thinking about like, do they think this is a serious political liability for them? Do they think it's a serious legal liability for them? There are some times when you can actually tell what they're playing defense against, and this is not one of them because it's so the lies are so tangled that you can't even figure out the meta truths there. I mean, it appears to me that. I don't know that you want to call this strategy, right? But like Trump's impulse, why? Which is an impulse that he inherits from several careers ago is to ride waves of attention and attempt to master right? Like he never believes that he should let something blow over, right? So like if something is coming, that is getting attention, he wants to inject himself into it and generate even more attention and make sure that his take on the thing also gets a lot of attention and he is successfully doing that. Like we all really know what Donald Trump thinks about Omarosa early Orly's what what he reports you, but like the Obama administration, right? Obviously, this exact situation would not have arisen, but like in general, like a controversy that was not substantively important that involved a person who. The White House regarded as not credible and not one of theirs and who even professional political reporters would not that inclined to take super seriously. They would have tried to just be dismissive of and move on and be like, what you really should be talking about is our advanced battery manufacturer, right? And like the president himself would never address it. You know, they'd put out like like the third deputy press secretary to be dismissive, right? And like that is not Trump right. Like Trump wants to like grab the electric wire of attention and like make sure you get his spin on it, and I would be hard pressed to call that like really good strategy for being president. But it's it's like it's clearly what he does write a little bit without regard to whether the underlying issue is they're seriously, we'll be like, well, he's he's like, distracting us from like what I think would be a good political message. But like he's also distracting us from what his own team thinks would be a good political message. DJ, whatever the their midterm strategy is like it was not this right. This brings me back to the compartment theory, which I think is the kind of boat compartment. Similarly, you came up with earlier in the episode because I think it's actually really it's a useful way to think about it because so many people in the White House appear to believe that this is about taking on water and they're trying to prevent themselves from getting swept under. But you know, given the president's impulsively not just on messaging, but on policy, you know, the reports that while he's in Bedminster and Mara Lago he'll like come back and say, oh, a member really wants me to look into this. You should take care of it that. Not only is there this danger that any given person in the White House is going to be tainted by overall chaos of the White House, but what do they have to show for being in the White House? What are they actually doing? That's not necessarily something in their control when the president can just like dictate the agenda based on what he's heard from Sean Hannity or some, you know, mar-a-lago member and it appears to be that they are currently spending more time trying to protect themselves from their colleagues.

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