Philippines, Deanne Kentish, Jamie discussed on BBC World Service

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

World Service right here on WNYC AM, NFL, New York. There are many who take issue with beauty pageants. They say the idea of women smiling while on stage installations is outdated, but can these contests be forceful? Good springboard to bigger things on the conversation. The first black woman to hold the Miss Universe. Great Britain, title DeAnne, Candice Rogers, speaks to miss earth, two thousand fourteen Jamie Herro about why they chose to enter. And if these contests are changing to reflect the times that's all after the news. With me, Kim, check Anita. BBC news with Debbie. Russ White House officials have confirmed that President Trump's daughter Ivanka used a personal Email account for government business after joining the administration last year. Mr. Trump made much of his opponent, Hillary Clinton's use of a private E mail server during the presidential election. A gunman has shot dead. Three people at a hospital in Chicago before being killed by police in an exchange of fire. He I sought a doctor dead outside the hospital, then stormed the building killing a pharmaceutical assistant and a police officer. There have been fresh air strikes by Saudi led coalition in the rebel-held Yemeni port of data after fierce fighting brought an end to a week of relative calm who's rebels and the government had both said they would agree to a ceasefire international efforts to end the conflict are continuing. President Xi Jinping has arrived in the Philippines on the first. Visit by a Chinese leader for thirteen years following president do election in two thousand sixteen the two countries have sought closer ties soldiers and police officers in Papua New Guinea have stormed the parliament building demanding bonuses promised to them for working during last week's APEC summit security staff at the summit in port. Moresby had apparently been promised an extra one hundred dollars in pay. The federal judge in San Francisco has temporarily blocked President Trump's order which barred immigrants from seeking asylum. If they entered the US illegally under the policy only people who cross legal checkpoints can request asylum. Scientists have identified a star system with the potential to produce one of the most extreme explosions the universe has ever seen second only to the big bang. They say a group of stars containing to the known as wolf-rayet stars. And they are spinning at vast speeds and their lives could end at anytime. The BBC news. Welcome to the conversation on the BBC World Service. I'm Kim check Anita here with the program that brings you a Frank. And unfiltered look at the lives of women across the world when it comes to beauty pageants. People seem to fall broadly into two camps on one side. Those who say that any competition that unfolds women traipsing around inhales while smiling and promoting world peace is an outdated relic that should go the way of the corset. But there are others who argue that beauty pageants can be life changing experiences that act as a springboard for the contestants to achieve academic and professional success. And to dismiss them offhand. We'd be wrong today. You're going to hear from to BT Kriens miss earth, twenty fourteen and Miss Universe. Creepers and twenty eighteen and went to find out when it comes to these competitions. What's in it for women? Jamie Herrell is a Filipino American. She. He was voted miss earth twenty fourteen. She also won the miss Philippines earth title that same year. Jamie is also a TV host dancer and businesswoman DeAnne Kentish watches is a look at you it and former Commonwealth track and field athlete in June. This year DeAnne became the first black winner of the Miss Universe. Great Britain title. She was born and raised in a British overseas territory in the Carribean, she's now based here in the u k now DeAnne you have described the experience of entering Miss Universe. Great Britain as being empowering. Yes, how well I started. My whole pageantry journey in a much smaller patent system in Anguilla. And I was able to use pedantry as kind of a vehicle to achieve self development is what really interested me in in the patent system because it not only acts for me to develop myself in terms of what do I want from this life because those are questions that they'll ask you, and you have to be able. To reflect on those and answer them for yourself. But it also challenged me to do something outside of my comfort zone. And I think that's that's the ingredient to empowering people you move outside your comfort zone you keep challenging yourself. And you become better. You take your failures. You squeeze the experience in the and the lessons out of them and you become better. And that's how it helped me to feel more confident in who. I am. So that's one aspect of those aspect of standing in front of a row of judges. And they judging you and your physical appearance and is often men and some people say that's hardly empowering. Yes, the very old criticism of pageantry that it is one that objectify women. It's been around for agents. My response to most people who criticize pageantry in that form. I say to them firstly you have to come and experience a pageant for us because a lot of people who level criticism. They've never experienced and they're not interested in. Experiencing a pageant, but they find that they have the authority to speak on it then level criticism. And I said, that's fine. People are entitled to the opinions. But it's not only about beauty. It's about confidence. It's about your ability to represent yourself because they're not simply judged on. How you look. But in any event, the fact that I decide to go on a stage in a bikini, which is objectionable to some people, which I think is very important to myself. I love my body. I love who I am. And a lot of the times the people who are saying that it's a cattle market are often guilty of objectify women themselves because they look at what I'm doing and say or you are a sexual object and saying you can only see me as a sexual object through your eyes. If that's the way, you perceive me than anything, I do will be perceived in that light okay through come back to. Jamie. I would like you to describe your experience, you beauty pageant experience. You were just seventeen when you first entered your UT pageant, what was your experience like when I was younger. I felt it does objectify women. And it does the grade women before I saw it in a different light. When my dad had Alzheimer's, and I had to find fast ways to make money in clean money. And when I joined the provincial pageant from where I'm from which was mislabeled apple I actually saw how women work really hard to win a crown, and it gave me more respect towards the women who joined pageantry because the things that people usually described beauty pageant winners or beauty pageant contestants where very degrading, but when you put yourself in their shoes, and you experience what they experience you see it in a different light. They are. Respectable women. Although a lot of them have the different reasons why they join but the effort placed in it is very difficult. So it was an eye opener for me in terms of positive aspects and negative aspects. Also is there a big culture of beauty contests in the Philippines. Yeah. There is here in the Philippines. They really look up to queens. So once you win a beauty pageant or even if your duty pageant contestant, and one of the biggest national pageants here in the Philippines, automatically an icon or somebody that people look up to when you joined beauty pageantry here automatically, you're losing your private life, and you're part of the public eye, and you're giving yourself an opportunity to be scrutinized by the public. So you always have to be at your best. And it's just like how it is in South America, or in other countries that really look up, the beauty, queens like Venezuela and Filan and Indonesia DeAnne. Debut. She cleans enjoy the same status and scrutiny as they do in the Philippines. Well, I wouldn't say it's as intense as in the Philippines. They have a massive industry over there. It's much smaller than Anguilla. But there is a level of respect from the general public scribe to beauty queens and once the security a title. Yes there in the public eye. The are scrutinized the actions are examined your health account for your actions. But quite often these women are using the pageant as a stepping stone to eight career goal and many people respect them for that. Now, Dan, you were a competitive athlete. You took part of the twenty four team coming off games until a knee injury stopped you career, and you also trained lawyer. So you've spoken about wanting to develop yourself. Why cou the pageantry route because the many ways it can develop yourself, you can learn the language you can meet a different country. And I'm learning a language. But it came about through having conversation with women who are involved in. Pageantry. And I've never seen myself. Never characterize myself as someone who is interested in in beauty pageants. I was a tomboy. And so when I spoke to some previous winners and I've learnt their stories. Some of them are solicitors some politicians some more environmental conservatives, they went to Oxford University, they came back, and it was speaking to me, and they said, you know, what the ad I know you at a crossroads in your life because your life is defined by ethics. But if you want another challenge, try beauty pageant. Yeah. Try something new. And I considered it for a long time. It's funny. My biggest fear about beauty pageants was about the swimsuit segment. That was my biggest fear, and what was your fear about that segment? I was scared that people would judge me that they would say that I was not virtuous or he talked on on me for my decision to put on a beating. And go on stage. But what surprised me was that going on stage in my bikini? I was able to take my Paul back from from people, my thoughts that people control the way, I perceive myself, or my watch you on my or who I was I took that back once I went on stage because that moment, it's like, it doesn't matter. What you think about me? It's a totally eye opening experience for me, at least Jamie what were your expectations going in. I thought it was just going to be very simple and relaxed like watching miss Congeniality funny. Even the girls, I thought it was gonna be like the movie we should just explain a miss Congeniality. It's a movie with Sandra Bullock, one in to miss Congeniality. I loved it. I thought that even the way that you answer at first I thought you have to say your name and say, thank you to everyone and all of these other things and just exactly the way. Miscounted? Like, you're always smiling. Always have like these roles on your hair before you go out. You know, you have to take them off. So you have the perfect curl. And I just really thought that it was going to be exactly like the movie. And that's the reason why my first pageant I made a huge lob on make you a name because I thought that there was a certain way that I needed to talk on stage. And then after that, I kind of found out that I just need to talk the way that I normally speak. How did you think you had to to? What did you say? I thought it was like this. Hello and good evening. Ladies and gentlemen. My name is Jamie Herrell, and my answer is to promote tourism. We have to start with world peace. I thought we had something like that. Right. See is much more scripted. And what was your worst moment during that particular competition? What was the hardest part of that competition? I guess the reason why it was the hardest part was it was because it was my first pageant, I was the chubby child. I was the child that technically would play in the mud and hang out with the guys and have like bell pants, or as I call it pants, and literally started pageantry because of lunch money. So imagine like you have to really change the whole way that you look in the hallway that you talk. Just so that you could click in with the concept that they have as of beauty queens. So it was the first time that I was wearing heels. I wore four inch heels I almost stumbled upon everything fell around. Was in a lot of pain. And it was just such a drastic change for me. But gave me like a huge respect for the women. So in that competition of miss lapu-lapu. I can honestly say that every single segment was difficult for me..

Coming up next