Chris Rogers, Jerry Mormon, Chris Leman discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

And getting ready. It was a lot of fun to be in across from them that winter. I remember. Yeah, I love that spring training analogy. That's just so perfect. We have about two minutes before we have to get to our commercial break here at the bottom of the hour damn, but I did want to go back to a comment you made when you were talking about learning from Jerry Mormon. You also talked about being around Chris Rogers, who was an excellent writer. And there was a story you told in the article that Chris leman had put out a couple of weeks ago about breezing horses with Chris and one day you were on a stakes horse. He was not. And that turned into a really fun story. Tell me more about that. Well, those guys back then, I mean, you know, when Chris started riding, I don't think there were cameras watching the races. Were there. So you learned to do things that you could get away with, I guess. You know, like I said, I was a bit before my time. By the time I started that we did have cameras and you learned to do things. And they used to tag onto a horse's saddle cloth. And you know, that the two horses would go along together. The one couldn't pull away from the other. And Chris was just full of all that kind of stuff. I remember another time I was breezing horse with him and I'm on a very fast Philly where I'm not training track at wood wine. And I'm on a fast Philly and he's on a really good horse this time. And the boss says to me, he says, set a pace for this horse and you know he'll go buy you somewhere in the stretch and you know that's your job today. So I break off and I'm going like a bat out a heck. I'm on a fleet Nash rule of Philly and I turn into the stretch and I still got some horse. Well, of course you're young and you're competitive and it's Chris Rogers. So you think maybe I'm going to give him a hard time here, right? So we straighten away and I look over my shoulder to the right and I don't see him and I look over my shoulder to the left and I don't see him running where the heck is he? You know? And I look back to where we started to see if something went wrong. And of course, he was sitting right in behind me. He was just tailgating me waiting till I looked around and then he's just dropped switch leaves, dropped her into the inside of me and just went by me. I assume, you know, and then of course you panic and you kind of throw your horses head away too much and he just went by me and just yeah, and he's giggling as he went by and it was fun and nice to holy mackerel, I said, you know, you may be look like an idiot. And he said Danny, I almost won a grade one in Chicago and beat Nashville, doing the same thing. He said, I tailgated that guy right till the very end and he said I ducked inside and the horse seeing me and he didn't and I got beat ahead, but he said, I've done that to a lot of people anyway. Yeah, he was a character and he was fun to work with and he was an absolute genius on a horse and it was fun being around those type of guys and they taught you a lot. Just by being around them, just realize that you had to learn things about horses that nowadays, I'm not sure that we understand that part of horses as much as they did. What a fantastic story visiting with trainer Dan vela here on trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. We're going to get to a short break when I come back in the second half of the program. We'll.

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