Equifax, ABC, United States discussed on Ric Edelman

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Listening to ABC news Radio, six ten, WTVN Allison Wyatt. It's the first, anniversary today of one of the worst security breaches in history. And you may have, been affected by it ABC's Daria Albinger say a consumer watchdog is worried today that not much has changed since then one year. Ago today equifax, identified a major security breach the credit, reporting service, announced it. On September fifth US perk says that was the first of many mistakes equifax if. Anything is improved at equifax in congress, still hasn't done anything hold them accountable spokesman Edwards Wenski very probable that some of the. Identity theft occurring right now is. Because of the equifax happy's urging people to freeze their credit until. They can make sure they're, safe US companies seeking to be exempted from president Donald. Trump's tariffs on imported steel are accusing American steel manufacturers have spreading inaccurate and. Misleading information today and they, may fear it may tour Pedo their requests companies fear that the Commerce Department will be, swayed, by opposition from Nucor. USD land other domestic suppliers that say they've been unfairly hurt by a glut, of imports and are backing the tariff US steel says its objections are based on detailed information about the dimensions and the chemistry of the steel fishermen and environmentalists are at odds today over changes to American fishing laws approved by the house. Of representatives the house passed the changes to the Magnuson Stevens. Act. A forty two year old set of rules, designed to protect American. Fisheries from over. Harvest environmental groups say the changes defeat the purpose of the act which many credit with saving American fish stocks supporters and some fishing groups say the changes merely provide managers with flexibility. And refocus the act on sound science and. It was a sign of goodwill this week North. Korea turned over what they say are the remains, of American service members. Killed during the Korean war the remains will now go, to a facility in Hawaii where analysts will try to identify them ABC's Martha Raddatz toured. The Hawaii facility what they will do now when these most recent remains come in is they will do DNA checks they will try to find family members and matchup that DNA they basically put the skeletons together it is a giant three d. puzzle. For your, ABC six first warning weather forecast partly sunny today with a high of eighty one I'm Alison Wyant more news at the bottom of the hour on demand at six ten WTVN dot com.

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