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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

It used to be that the clothes you wore to the gym. We're like the absolute worst clothes you on the radio t. shirt. You got for free at some event sweatpants with your high school logo, the kind of short shorts Dr j. would've worn on the past couple court. Anyway, most of the payroll was cotton-based. Baggy didn't look so great. And honestly, nobody really cared. You had one job to do which was to sweat at the gym, but at some point in the past ten or fifteen years, all of that changed because severally the clothes you war to work out. Also the clothes you wear to the grocery store or at a restaurant or even at work. So for better or worse, people were wearing their gym clothes outside of the gym on purpose and this trend it was called at leisure and chip Wilson. He was one of its pioneers, the brand he built out of his house in Vancouver. Is now worth more than fourteen billion dollars. Now, before I go on, let me just address the elephant in the room ship has said some things that are well had I put this rude and Borish he's put his foot in his mouth. On several occasions, he's embarrassed the company and you will hear about some of that later on in the show, but he's also an open book and open to getting grilled all about his life. He's not a cautious media trains soundbites guy, which is in part what makes him interesting because that's sort of how chip grew up without any pretension middle class kid and Calgary Canada. Chip was athletic. He played hockey and football. His dad taught phys Ed at the local high school, and his mom was a seamstress. She lived for it. It's we're total passionless. She tried to make clothing for the kids, but of course we didn't. We'd never liked what she made for us. But you know if I want to spend time with my mom. It had to be foot in the solar. So did you learn how to? So like from an early age? I can definitely so, but more so I think it was working with the butterick patterns in watching my mum, lay them down on the fabric and then and then how she moved them into his them in order to save fabric. And I always say how important that is because once I got into big production and you'd lay fifty to a hundred layers of fabric down when you can save even five, six, seven inches of fabric, it can mean thousands of dollars before chip would go on so and design clothes for living. He actually got his first real job at an oil company working a grueling, but incredibly lucrative job on the Alaska oil pipeline for almost two years. How much do you walk away with how much can well interesting in today's dollars probably about six hundred thousand and it was, but one hundred seventy five thousand American is amazing. Amazing. You were like. Nineteen. This cash, and that's simply because it was all of this money to work the Alaska. Well, by blood, I guess. Right? And but I, you know, I traded my life in for money. I mean, there was no girls. There was nothing there except for you know, you work. So I always wonder, you know, if everyone got that opportunity with, they have made the same thing out of it. I did pretty good. You're eighteen nineteen or twenty with a bunch of cash. So what did you put you do the money? Well, at all, had three goals, Alaska when stolen my own house by the age at twenty to be in my own business by the age of thirty and retired by forty and retirement meeting that I was doing exactly what I wanted to do so. So I did. I bought a house and then I finished up my degree and I worked for an oil company. And this isn't company back in Calgary, right? Because you moved back there some, right. And I guess in like the late seventies right, pretty much around the time you graduate. Culture or you start to make shorts like baggy shorts from in? Yeah, because I didn't. You know. You have to get it what it was like at that time, men were very short shorts that were very, very tight. You know, you only have to look at movies from from the late seventies to get that kind of picture. And and they made a lot of sense to me because I had very big legs and I was, I think, because I was working out three times a day, I was always in constant sweat, and the idea of wearing shorts fulltime was very appealing to me. And. And so you and these were like flower printed like loud, Hawaiian. Like trader Joe's like those shirts. Like that's what the shorts looked like. Yeah, exactly. But you know, we have to see it in a context that there was nothing like that before. Everything else was that era of Brown rust off color, okra yellow, like solid colors. There was no brightness in the world at all that time. So that was a radical look. So I started because I couldn't get loud flowered prints in two thousand. Meters, which is kind of what a person needs to go into business. I started doing what my mom did. She quilted fabric, so I would get masses of different types of patterns of fabric, and then I would