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Visit Gothamist dot com anytime for updates this is market place kai result at the risk of repeating myself here it is more likely than not that lots of businesses big ones and small ones are going to come out the other end of this thing at particular risk restaurants which operate on super thin margins in the best of times the cold hard reality is that those businesses closing is a business opportunity in itself because there are companies auctioneers basically that specialize in liquidating bankruptcy attorneys assets and a lot of those companies are already seeing businesses pick up market place Kimberly Adams here she is again as that one often when a restaurant goes out of business owners need to get rid of a lot of stuff and quickly so they hire an auctioneer but not necessarily a fast talker like so many other things liquidation auctions have shifted online in recent years with schedule pick up times online bidding and video tours posted on YouTube since this give me through the kitchen real quick for a prep table flex storage problem tables you got your refrigerator's freezer businesses shut down and liquidate all the time for a mix of reasons now almost all the calculations revolve around cove it nineteen B. J. Jennings president of Jennings auction group in Pennsylvania says restaurants where she's based I just can't survive this being shot for two months how much longer it will be and then trying to restart their businesses it's going to be a very very difficult situation Jennings auction company is temporarily closed it's a non essential business in the state but she says and I expect that once were able to start conducting business once the courts reopen start filing for bankruptcy is we're going to start seeing an awful lot of filings that are going to be for liquidations auction companies tend to be leading indicators of economic hard times according to John Schultz with the national auctioneers association he works for gray function in Minnesota and he says it's not always an easy business these are conversations that are bitter sweet right when when these iconic restaurants and bakeries and food service places where we commune as people call you and say you know I can't do this anymore if it really pulls on your heartstrings right Schultz is currently talking about liquidation with a local bakery a fixture of his community he is grateful for the business opportunity but also it is almost a a bit of a mutual grieving process you know with the owner of that business and you Hey how can I help you move on you can close this chapter and start the next chapter of of your life determining just when to close that chapter is particularly challenging for small business owners right now earlier in the pandemic we knew very little about how long the shutdowns would last or what reopening might look like Christopher Rasmus is CEO of Rasmus auctions which runs online liquidations in the mid Atlantic region I think as this this epidemic has matured it's becoming clearer to people what the future might look like we're back in early March there's no idea what was going to look like for a while his business tapered off but in the last week or so he's been getting more calls from successful business people pre coded into the pram was kind of I never thought I would be making this phone call but I'm gonna need to consider liquidating my business now if a bunch of commercial refrigerators and bar tables suddenly start coming on the market that could push down prices affecting just how much of a loss business owners are stuck with but for those that are in a position to buy Pennsylvania auctioneer B. J. Jennings says they will be able to take advantage of an opportunity to buy a good replacement used equipment and furnishings and while operations are shut down some businesses are trying to think strategically Eric Heiden burger is a partner in DC restaurant group which owns eleven locations here in Washington DC and in Delaware if the shutdown only lasts another few weeks he is optimistic Kilby able to reopen and he's been scoping out some of the online auctions there's always repairs that need to be done in a restaurant there's tables and chairs that you might be whether Dennis refrigerators dryers kitchen equipment hiding their ethnologists it's awkward to potentially benefit albeit indirectly from other restaurants failing but he thinks of it like a scene from the movie Forrest Gump where you know he buys a shrimp boat and there's a lot of competition to start and then you know he weathers this big hurricane storm and he's one of the last boat standing at the end our goal is to weather this storm as best as we can and maybe come out stronger in the end in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for market place if you've got a kid or two at home right now odds are real real good that kid is spending more time in front of a screen than might ordinarily be allowed some of that screen time is educational one hopes some probably less so but back in the nineteen sixties when an experimental partially government funded television show called Sesame Street went on the air promising to help close the achievement gap in education the idea that screens could teach at all seemed revolutionary David camp has a new book out on that subject it's called sunny days the children's television revolution that changed America David walking the program thank you hi glad to be here I suppose we have to start here by noting both vision the amazing timing of this book but.

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