Minu, Williams, Antarctica discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

So why would we see monuments but not see the homes of the people who lived in nearby, right? Maybe they're just so far covered by the ice, maybe only the monuments are large enough to be visible. Well, maybe grandma handcocks thirteen less than thirteen thousand years ago. Williams six thousand years ago. Maybe their way off on how long ago structures were there because we do know that that over time nature takes over. And we'll erase almost anything like weathering and just like totally wearing down mountains over time, and it's crazy. But yeah, I'd love to see a time lapse of them pretty cool. Yeah, exactly. But then you have to start thinking, well, then how old have humans or at least intelligent life actually been on this planet. Right, right. Which that date keeps it seems to get pushed back further and further every decade. You know, Minu discoveries who new discoveries going back as far as what sixty thousand years, I think is one of the newer ones at least close to where we're at right now. So. There's also argument that we've brought nature into this. There's also an argument that maybe the ice on Antarctica is not even if it formed millions of years ago. Maybe it wasn't as constant a presence as we have initially assumed. Interesting. Maybe the ice ebbed and flowed. You know what I mean? Waxed and waned. Maybe there were times when the glaciers retreated away from coastal areas, right? Then possible and maybe they did that for long amounts of time. Yeah, there. There's so many possibilities. I, I bet there are scientists out there going. No, absolutely. Not. Studying this entire life and no, you can't say that. Well, we don't know. That's true. We don't know, and we're not saying that the entire thing is covered with a glacier. At this point. It's just it's still inhospitable. Yeah. So we can tell you, however, about a very particular map, which for people who believe in our to maybe more familiar with to our species than we have always assumed this is sometimes seen as a smoking gun. Stay tuned after the break will introduce you to period Rhys. It's Barrington day Thurston host of spit, iheartradio's newest podcast, twenty three.

Coming up next