Abby Herron Clarkson, Salva, Richard Burke discussed on The World

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Lot in that way. These days is eight works remotely from a house in rural Virginia, where she lives with Sandra. Her husband Rudy, and another more talkative dog named blue. It's still unusual for people to leave the disability program and return to work less than one percent of recipients do so each year. But the numbers have been growing, as the job market's improved at the same time aging baby boomers are moving from disability into retirement, and the government has made it harder for new people, the qualify for disability. Paypal typically approved in two thousand ten may not necessarily be approved nail Abby Herron Clarkson is a lawyer who helps people apply for disability in Alabama when jobs evaporated during the great recession, many people turn to disability as a kind of defacto unemployment insurance by twenty thirteen there were parts of Alabama were nearly one out of four workers was collecting disability check. But since then, the state's disability rolls have shrunk by about fifteen percent. It typically takes more than a year to qualify for disability. And Clarkson says these days more for clients are finding work during that period as employers have grown more willing to make allowances you know, like someone out like into their fifties someone who's maybe has a medical history with some surgeries. Maybe they, they need some sort of accommodation more employers, now because there is a demand for labour are more willing to accommodate to that sort of thing, of course. Many people on disability are simply unable to work Clarkson says, but not everyone ninety eight to ninety nine percent of all the people, I run into would much rather work, then collected disability check. And that's just the truth. Clarkson says many people who become disabled suffer from anxiety, and depression, when they can no longer work on hill. Salva felt that way six years ago when a bad back. Drove him out of the air force after a dozen years in the service. He has wife just had their first son. It was scary. You know, now I'm not able to provide for my family. I had a ton of challenges Salva still suffers from chronic pain. But a couple of years ago, he found a job doing IT work for a defense contractor, he still has trouble sitting for long periods, but his boss got some ergonomic furniture. And the allows Salvador work, flexible hours, I'm no longer sitting home thinking about what's going to happen tomorrow? I take it one day at a time, giving up the guaranteed income and health benefits that come with this ability is a huge decision Salvator advantage of a program designed to make that leap back in the job market, a little less risky. It allowed him to keep his disability benefits for a trial period when he first returned to work making the move was still a bit of a gamble. Salva says, but he's glad he did it, it was always a dream to serve my country. I joined the air force at eighteen years old. And I was intending to have a twenty year career without that was cut short and not on my terms, but I've discovered that can be done. There is a market. For every skill set out there. The Trump administration wants to encourage more people with disabilities to work, both to meet the demands of a growing economy and save the government money. One of the president's economic advisers, former Cornell professor Richard Burke. Houser has long had a personal interest in the disability program. My dad was a worker, and when the plant closed down, he was out of work and late fifties Burke, are encouraged his dad to apply for disability rather than looking for another job, but he later came to second. Guess that advice he thinks being out of work may have contributed to his father's death, just a few years later, and I think in part because his whole life was work and. I think it affected him. So I've always felt with the last resort. We can get people with disabilities too much. Better Burke, Houser believes a hot economy has done more to move people off disability than any policy changes dreamed up here in Washington wheelchair. Marketer, Danny Isaiah agrees. Tight job market is opening doors for people with disabilities. But she warns many still face discrimination. She says if employers can look past that they'll be rewarded with workers who are adaptable, flexible and persistent that can do attitude that the creativity involved in living a life with the disability. Honestly that attitude isn't asset to an employer. As the number of disabled workers grows, more employers are finding that out Scott Horsely, NPR news Washington, and you can find more of our full employment coverage all this week on the radio and NPR dot org. Nasa has a frequent flyer program that's out of this world? Literally people who sign up to send their names to Mars on the next Rover mission, will earn three hundred thirteen million five hundred eighty six thousand six hundred forty nine award miles from the space agency. NPR science correspondent Joe palca has details. It's all part of a public engagement campaign to get people interested in the Mars twenty twenty mission. A Rover mission that will look for signs of ancient life on Mars. The names will be microscopic etched into a silicon chip that will ride along with the Rover more than a million people signed up in the first twenty four hours. You know, it's remarkable how many people just love to send their names to other destinations. That's emily. Lucked Awalleh with the planetary society. She says, NASA has sent names on a number of its space missions. So has the Japanese space agency. There's another spacecraft named high abusive to that carried names that were engraved on a little baseball sized target marker that they dropped on the surface of an asteroid. So their names. All over the solar system, right now in its away that people feel they can participate in space exploration, lack Douala says, yes, awarding people with frequent flyer miles for sending their names to Mars is a gimmick. But it's a gimmick that engages people and gets people to think about the distances between planets. It's just one more hook to take something that's kind of cute and give it little spoonfeed of educational with it Mars twenty twenty is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral next July. And if all goes, well, it will landed a spot on Mars called Jezero crater in February twenty twenty one.

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