Julian Assange, Ecuador, London discussed on All Things Considered

Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Shapiro chang. After seven years inside Ecuador's embassy in London. Julian Assange was thrown out today. British police took him into custody paving the way for his extradition to the US. The Justice department has charged him with conspiracy related to the leak of national security information while some have hailed Assange for exposing government secrets other say he has put US missions and staff at grave risk. We'll hear more about that in a few minutes that I understand why Assange took refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in the first place. We're joined now from London by NPR's ofeibea, Quist arcton. Welcome greetings. So it has been a pretty dramatic day in London for Assange. Can you just briefly describe what has happened today at about ten o'clock local time, the British police arrived at the Ecuador's embassy way, you say he's been since two thousand twelve and invited in by the Ecuadorian? Government. They have led half carry Julian Assange who's looking on frail with a huge white bed out to the embassy. He was shouting this is unlawful this is unlawful and they bundled him into a waiting van. Can we just rewind the clock seven years? I mean what what was the co founder of WikiLeaks doing taking refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London in the first place, Julian Assange was accused of rape and molestation in Sweden, which was seeking his extradition. So in two thousand twelve he was in court in Britain, and he was out on bail. Now, he jumped bail said to speak, and he literally ducked into the Ecuador embassy, and he has been there ever since. So he has spent seven years inside an embassy his movement. Have been restricted for the past several years. How did he cope initially pretty well? I mean, we used to see Julian Assange on the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy. Speaking almost holding court, then he was very confident he was confident because the then president of Ecuador was a friend of his he made one of these pronouncements from the embassy balcony back into listen. One hundred.

Coming up next