Houston, Dr. Freeman, George discussed on Nightline

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George Florence funeral here in Houston today there was a unified call for justice, not just for one man, but for every man. Earlier today I spoke to Houston mayor so vest return has to PT and Wollo and Texas Southern University student Alexandria Barnaby. Thank you all for joining us Mr Mayor. I like to start with you. You now plans to sign an executive order that will ban the use of Cocos in Houston. How else does your civic handling? Yes, conversation on police reform. Well, you know it's been a very robust conversation, which is good I will be signing an executive an executive order that will deal with deadly force deescalation training comprehensive reporting along with other things as well. What was it much resistance, or was the spirit and the city of Houston that something had to change now. But I think as a spirit in this city as well as cities across this country I mean people frustrated. They're angry. Emotions running high. They saw what happened to George flawed. They don't WanNa. See that repeated. In fact, they've seen it happen to too many people. Especially African Americans and so black lives matter. That's critically important. Look, we need the community and law enforcement to be on the same team moving in the same direction and pastor place joining this conversation. You knew George Foot. He was a friend of yours talk about this moment in time for you and talk about your dear friend George is. The picture, perfect example of what Christianity is it's. It's not defined by perfection. Is defined by redemption. and. I met him while I was trying to break into ministry in Cuny. Halls project I needed a partner. Who would help me get into the doors and big floor was a gateway that allow me to do man countless things. If you call them was a servant leader. It sounds like it was deathly a servant leader. And Alexander I. Know Your Student At. Texas Southern University historically Black College. It's world famous debate team you're you're part of that for your generation, which seems to be the real energy now in this movement if if it is that what's? Where's your heart right now? My heart is Is Heavy, because of the fact that. We have to move with intention I think that it is. It's It's okay to do it now where we're seeing a trend to do it now, but we can't lose that motivation. My heart is focused on not only seeing you know the this particular case be brought to justice, but prevention form allowing it to happen again. When certainly you talk to people of perhaps of my generation to people in power across our country and politics. They talk about be patient. Your generation doesn't sound like you have any interest in being patient. Because we've watched it happen time and time again. Our mothers were patient. Our grandfathers were patient. They were all very patient, and now is not the time for us to be patient. Because I'm pretty sure that George flood was very patient while he was gasping for air. I'm pretty sure that you know the mini black men and women who have lost their lives due to law enforcement were patient when as when trying to you know advocate for their right to live. So I. This is not the time for patients. This is the time for action. Mayor what's next for Houston. Here, Look. This is a very diverse city It's it's important people on. People want good policing. They want accountability. They won't transparency is not just about getting good. Policing and policing right is also about making sure that we're meeting. The needs of people in communities that have been undeserved and under resource for a long time quality housing, quality playgrounds parks economic business job opportunities, good quality education. All of these things are important, so if you invest in these communities that have been undisturbed and under resource for decades then you don't have to spend as much on policing pastor you can. Can you can hear the frustration in the mayor's voice certainly here in Alexandra's voice you as a man of the Gospel. How did you reassure people in this time? When people are sick and tired of being sick and tired, they're tired of promises. They want results. God here's the every innocent suffering from able to Christ and including our brother Floyd. He's heard his voice, I think his death was an inflection. Point we either going to master the sin of racism, or the sin of racism is going to masters us. Alexandra will give you the last talking to pastor mind for the scripture that says a child will lead the way your generation will lead this movement. A mindful for you just yesterday. You Lost Your Mentor Dr. Thomas Friedman, the legendary debate coach at t issue. WHO also taught Dr? Martin Luther King Junior debate, but do you think Dr Freeman might say about this time to you and your classmates, so your university tallest Dr Freeman has always encouraged us to use our platforms as a way to vocalise plight. It's more than just good policing. We need an actual change in the way. Civilians Interact with law enforcement Dr Freeman has always encouraged us to not only put our best foot forward, but act with intention. It's more than just saying black. Black lives matter we have to make black lives matter and protect those black lies with legislation with protection with action Dr. Freeman always said in. It's the motto of our debate team. What we do, we do well what we don't do. Well, we don't do it all. It is time for not only Houston, but every city in America to do this and do it right the pastor for him. It is the word of God. That gives some comfort. I know for the mayor. It is the power of position that he's able to influence change. Where does your spring comes? My strength comes from. Generations of Black Women being silenced of being denied the basic inalienable rights guaranteed to every person in this country, but our people wash. Thank you all so much through time. Thank you for this. Conversation is a long one. It will continue for a while. Thank. Thank you..

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