Mike Fennell, Jack Haley, Barbara Steele discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies
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What was your first Baker film? What was the first time that you kinda got to go. My first bigger film while the most expensive movie I ever made was looney tunes, which was way way more expensive than it should have been took a year and a half, and he's not. I like to revisit. Maybe. I guess it would be probably inner space is that was a decent budget and what didn't get messed with, and it was fun to make an came out and it didn't exactly set the world on fire, but through the miracle of home video, it is now a much beloved movie. We're the only would that awful title in that terrible Ed, it didn't do much. Good grief. Now there's an intermediate intermediate period. We made two films that have always had good reputations piranha and the howling. I wouldn't exactly use the phrase good reputations, but I would. I wouldn't knock it. No, I, the howling was a movie that I, I, I did piranha for Roger, and that was a movie. We're really nobody expected it to be any good. And it opened during a newspaper strike which saved me from bad reviews, and it was Bobby did very well. And particularly because it was the culprit actually United Artists. They spent more money, advertising it in all of the other territories, animated fortunate South America where they actually know how to pronounce the word for Anya. Because in the movie only Barbara Steele says the word correctly. Everybody else has Peron which is which makes sense because that's the way people talk, but is h. Yeah, and it was. It was a hard movie to make, but it was. It was worth it. And then and I, there was some wonderful people in it. Bradford Dolman Kevin McCarthy who I later, you know, made a lot of movies with, and then I got a chance to make the howling when when I was joyous three people zero, I was working on universal and that looked like it was going to go belly up and they were go between directors on the howling and they and Mike, my friend, Mike Fennell was producing, and he said, you know, you wanna do or wolf movie, and I said, sure I came over and it looked like it needed a lot of work. So I called John Sayles friend of mine who had done the rewrite unparalleled to come and do rerun them howling. And again, it was another movie that nobody expected anything from, and it turned out to be surprisingly successful to the point that we're like seven sequels. None of which I had anything to do with and. It's it was sort of the first postmodern where wolf movie is. It was the first movie where the characters in the movie know as much about the subject as the audience and so that they don't have to go to the old professor and having been on like hanthropy. And since then that sort of self awareness has has crept into the scream movies. And you know now now now it's generally taken for granted that everybody in the movie knows all the tropes. For better or worse. That's a transition that I mean, how many times can you really overdue that same scene where you have to explain that. No, no, I know would've empire. Get it. The blood of the cross. Starlink and the whole thing and it. Yeah, it's which gives rise to that great line in fearless vampire killers where the Jewish vampire says, have you got that long vampire. Up the cross. I've never seen that. I'm not as content. Oh, it's a good movie. So funny. I don't know if you were going to remember this or not, but. When you were about to make or making Amazon women on the move all up one of my classics. Alison. I went to a bear with me for a minute. Bear with me folks of also I went to a Christmas party given by Jack Haley junior because I've worked with Jack on some of his documentary seeds, a lot of Hollywood behind the scenes stuff. And we went to this party and we didn't know anybody there. Everyone look very attractive as if they ought to be somebody we didn't who any of them were. Very congenial party though, and an Alice looks at the bar and sitting there as hunts all. Hunts hall. One of the original dead end kids who then had twenty year career making the east side kids, the Bowery boys, that cetera, et cetera..

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