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Abrams, Canneries, Premier Magazine discussed on The Filmcast

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Coverage. I'm like oh wow i forgot that like they would just put a picture of you mcgregor on the cover and have absolutely nothing to say about it but we would all by because it was star wars. <hes> you know it's tough. It's very i i do feel as though i i certainly think for you know the it's kind of hard to compare in some ways because is the magazines are all gone for the most part and premiered here is gone. <hes> you know spin which covered a lot of movies in the late. Nineties is gone now. Rolling stone doesn't cover film to the extent. They did in the late nineties entertainment. Weekly is now entertainment weekly monthly which is as someone who worked there for many years a lot of friends there. That's that's very tough for me. You know i do think it was a little bit more skeptical back then <hes> in general and i and i think it was also you know they got the access was a a lot less control. I mean certainly when you read old premier magazine making of articles by the late nineties. The studios had kind of figured out like you know. Don't just put someone on set for the three days but you still get these articles about the making these films and you're like wow ever will be fired at the story got out now. I mean some of those premier magazine. Nineties articles goes on winter onset for three or four days and it's like you know gene hackman chewing someone out or francis ford coppola torturing winona ryder on the set of of dracula ella that stuff that's winning it out nowadays yeah i mean i recently watched that phantom menace documentary. You know what i'm talking about the one that was on the the d._v._d. Of the phantom yeah you ever see the book yeah yeah yeah so it was like <hes> it's like a sixty seventy minute documentary about i think it's called the beginning making episodes. Watch it on youtube right now. I believe it is an innocent amazing documentary but it is extremely striking to watch that documentary and then watch like the special features of the force awakens right because the force awakens special features are extremely polished it is everyone had the best time of their lives making this movie and there was never any conflict onset <hes> j.j abrams is a genius and i'm sure you know j.j. Abrams is genius. Yes i actually do believe that but i also think that filmmaking is a very challenging <hes> tiring process and that it involves a lot of strong personalities and that conflict afflict is inevitable and it is fascinating when you have a chance to see that conflict in like the phantom menace documentary and you just basically never really see that anymore right now i i mean and there's great i mean the matrix has a great documentary. There's one scene where canneries is trying to execute one of those flips and he's just just see him getting so frustrated and he really get this. It's like it's maybe a minute of footage but you get a sense of what that entire year and a half was like for those actors to just be trying to do this impossible task matrix revisited right. I think is i think so yeah yeah and i think that also an ex gold standard of beyond the straight right oh that d._v._d. That whole d._v._d. When orders put that was fantastic and you know magnolia has a great you know paul thomas anderson just lets the camera follow him everywhere the magnolia documentary and it's really loose and sunday it feels edited but not edited just to protect anyone. It just feels like a really well put together. I mean i learned a lot from those d._v._d.'s. I watched n._f._l. I said i'd give it a five in the morning. I need to watch a movie or a commentary or a making of and to sit sit there taking notes. I think what we're learning from. This conversation. Bryant is that nine hundred ninety nine was not only the best movie you're ever. It was the best movie special features you're ever yes. I you know oh if if if there was a bigger audience for that book on the history of d._v._d..

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