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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Welcome back to town hall Ohio we're talking about farmers and how they manage their operations to not only feed the world but also protect Ohio's water quality telling the story Doug beard or five USTA's NRCS Jordan Hey we're sure of the Ohio farm bureau and Erin filers who is managing the Blanchard river demonstration farms network Erin described force quickly a little bit about edge field monitoring basically capturing the water the leaves the surface or through underground tile measuring the nutrients ran it dug a part of this that's the that's really the research component or one of the key research components is the fact that you have what you call paired field sites what is that why do you do it okay appeared appeared is essentially to individual is set ups each with rage of field monitoring equipment set up on two different fields that have similar characteristics as far soils and terrain and slow and Donna it's great if we can have the same farmer operate those two different watersheds what we try to do is capture the base of condition so what is naturally coming off of that through the farmers normal method of practice and then what we can do is change of variable and that farmers operation whether be a cover crop installation whether it be a change a nutrient management whether to be a change in some other part of his production system and we can measure that impact by a comparing what we see coming off the field with that change as we can repair it back to the baseline so it's a it's a great opportunity to do great research so Jordan as you look at this edge of field monitoring what what sticks out in your mind is maybe the top one or two things that we we've learned to a half three years into this yeah I think the biggest thing we've learned with the edge of field not only fits my new or or commercial fertilizer is placing another ground so getting that many were covered up in the soil to some degree obviously of the balance between full Telligent full incorporation and then you know sometimes you'll put him there differ letterman or just on the surface so you the balance between those two and make sure that you get that those nutrients covered to some degree so I learned a lesson the first time I visited the Kellogg operation they apply commercial fertilizer and you know if if you don't know anything about agriculture say well let's just put all of our fertilizer under the soil surface or let's inject all of our maneuver into the into the ground so the Kellogg's are testing it with the commercial fertilizer of the US state learns of testing it with with liquid manure what's it cost the testing the did not just the testing the equipment I'll do that the equipment gather the Kellogg's they use strip tillage so they're putting their fertilizer out with that that type of tool bar I'm not granted there a large operation so they have just bigger equipment in general about their strip tillage barb was of gosh about a hundred ninety thousand dollars for that bar to put that fertilizer below the soil surface the the sailors with their minore operation probably in the fifty to sixty thousand dollar range and then the technology that goes on top of that to give it the ability to variable rate that new Trent he is also many thousands of dollars so that the equipment costs add up quickly and that doesn't even count the tractor that might be two hundred thousand dollars and that's gonna pull this equipment so it is a very costly endeavor to accomplish that goal so I go back to the math we mentioned at the top of the show there that basically in order to meet some some target forty percent reduction types of of goals we scene we're talking about a farmer that's losing roughly twenty five cents per acre and nutrients but fixing that problem can run twenty thirty forty dollars or more per acre to actually fix it so thus the math of how do we balance productive agriculture with water quality Doug there's a another practice that farmers are beginning to adopt and and we're learning more about planting cover crops what's a cover crop in what to do for the farmer and what to do for the water what I talk for farmers I tried to use the analogy that cover crops are like a crescent wrench they can do you they can be used to to do a lot of different things they can be adjusted to to accommodate that farmer specific objective whether it be organic matter depletion they would have billed organic matter where they want to sequester hold nutrients whether they are trying to to just stop build soil health and so are those objectives can be accomplished with a lot of different species and so what we try to do is is asset producer what do you want to do with cover crop and then we can make a specific recommendation to the farmer this far species and rates are concerned but there is a tremendous amount of interest and we have worked with literally hundreds of by the thousands of farmers who are interested in are applying cover crops in the western base someone asked the same question of you Jordan again so if this works why doesn't everybody do it yeah I mean I guess our our goal overall is that you know we're we're trying to be a conduit to all this information right you were bringing all this research information all these results and every farmers different every farmers in different situation there's there's a bunch of different soil types and capabilities in and willingness to do certain stuff and then and so what we try to do is provide a suite of things they can they can pull from so we talk about the few different buckets.