Your Next Workout

Perfect for the gym, your daily run or any other exercise routine, these stories will keep your brain busy while your blood's pumping. Tune in to an eclectic mix of healthy living tips, the latest developments in science, a drop of history and a touch of self-help.

A highlight from Vicky Tsai | Creating Tatcha Beauty

The Emma Guns Show

01:42 min | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from Vicky Tsai | Creating Tatcha Beauty

"Show now. She wants to speak to me for a couple of days because we disagreed on what order you should put cream and jam on a scone. She asked me that one. Or scone, it's gone or scone. I'm not even totally sure what it's gonna do. It's just a fruity doughy thing. Next time when I come here, I'm going to actually see London. I'm going to see what a scone is. Let's go for afternoon tea. Okay. I used to think that I was angry at other things and other people in other situations. Ultimately, I had to sit back and realize, oh, not am angry with myself, because nobody's forcing me to muzzle myself. Nobody's forcing me to be inauthentic. I'm doing that. And it's exhausting and I'm so glad I'm learning this right now because my daughter is about to turn 13. I am truly delighted to welcome to the podcast Vicky si, the founder of bestselling beauty brand tatcha. It's truly incredible to have you on the show. Welcome to my honor. Your story is a really fascinating one. And as soon as I read your bio, I knew that I had to have you on the show because you worked as a Wall Street trader, you were at ground zero on 9 11, you have an MBA from Harvard Business school, and while working tirelessly to build a career in business, decided instead to choose happiness. You not only chose happiness, but you also chose happiness with no plan of how to achieve it. However, that search for that plan and inspiration appeared when you were traveling, travels that led you to Kyoto,

Vicky Si London Harvard Business School Kyoto
A highlight from How to OUTSMART Your Market with Multiple Disruptive Startups and Vertical Integration with Jeff Fenster: From the 2019 archive

Entrepreneur on FIRE

00:47 sec | 17 hrs ago

A highlight from How to OUTSMART Your Market with Multiple Disruptive Startups and Vertical Integration with Jeff Fenster: From the 2019 archive

"Boom, shake the room fire nation, jail D here and welcome to entrepreneurs on fire, brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network with great shows like online marketing made easy. Today we're pulling a timeless EO fire episode from the archives so the giveaway may not be active. And we'll be breaking down how to outsmart your market with multiple destructive startups and vertical integration to drop these value bonds we have brought Jeff fenster into eo fire studios. Jeff is a founder of the rapidly expanding SoCal based super food brand ever bowl. He is a serial entrepreneur focus on disruptive startups and revenue driving innovation to grow and sustain successful brands leveraging vertical integration in a philosophy of making friends and having fun. And today for our nation, we'll talk about how experience is great, but you can jump right in. We'll talk about the right introductions.

Jeff Fenster Jeff
Memory Loss (MM #4272)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Memory Loss (MM #4272)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Obviously, as we get older, we start worrying about memory loss, or at least the TV news tells me that every night because I need to take private and I believe it is. But the one thing we can do to help our bodies as we age is, of course, eat more fruits and vegetables and think about foods, high in flavonoids. Yeah, it's chemicals built into these foods. And of course, flavonoids are things that help with memory loss, or at least they're supposed to. Flavanols are a type of flammable. It's confused already. But they have shown to help in human studies, reduce inflammation, the major trigger for chronic disease, and have antioxidants. So things we're talking about, broccoli, blueberries, cauliflower, kale, leeks, spinach strawberries. You can also find some and things like chives and dill and tarragon, grapes, black currants, honey, green tea, nuts, all the important foods that we should be thinking about all the time as we get older, are supposed to help other memory, too. Of course you could probably write this down, don't you? Because you may forget one or two.

Kevin Mason Nasa Chronic Disease
A highlight from Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life with Nir Eyal: From the 2019 archive

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:27 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life with Nir Eyal: From the 2019 archive

"Near, say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know. Well, what is up fire nation? It's great to be back. Something that most people don't know about me is that I do not have a lot of self discipline that I think some of my friends think that I'm this guru of productivity and I've written two books and I got my MBA at Stanford and I'm real, I must have a lot of willpower and a lot of self control and that just ain't true that we'll get into this further in terms of my next book called indestructible, but let me tell you, I do what I do because I have this problem with not being able to stay on track and so that's why I research what I research is how do I shape my own behavior in this way because I found throughout my life that self control has always been a problem for me. Near you put Ben and Jerry's in front of me and all self control leaves. I can't help myself. What is my problem? I'm right there with you on that couch. I'm going to the only thing that might stop you from eating that Ben and Jerry's might be me pulling it away from you. Oh, lord. Okay, okay, I need to tell Kate to start using that strategy. Actually, that is such a great way to start this interview because you've just really hit upon such an important aspect of what I learned writing this next book in distractible. In that if the men and Jerry's ice cream is already in your hand, right? If the spoon is on its way to your mouth is too late. Too late. Too late. So here's the thing. If there's one thing from this entire interview and course that I want you to, everybody out there to remember is that the antidote to impulsiveness is forethought. That we have our species has this amazing ability that no other animal on earth has, which is to predict the future. We can see what's going to happen days, weeks, months, years into the future. And so what I learned is that we can conquer distraction that we can do what we say we're going to do by planning ahead. Love that and fire nation as I mentioned in the intro, we're going to be talking all about what it means to be in distractible. So that we can control our attention and choose our life. So why don't we just dive right in, break down what this word indestructible means and then what I love is you have four steps for us. So then roll right into that. Absolutely. So the nice part about making up a word is that you can define it any way you want. So I made up this word in distractible because it sounds like indestructible. And the reason is is that this is really what I think is the superpower of this century. This is the macro skill that can help you accomplish whatever you it is you want in life because you know what I've learned over the years. You know, I taught at Stanford for many years, the business school there and the design school there. And I've researched behavioral design for many, many years now. And one of the things I realized is that most people don't have a lack of knowledge. We know pretty much what we want to do. If you want to lose weight, we all know what to do, right? You got to exercise and eat healthfully. If you want to have good relationships, you have to be fully present with the people you care about. If you want to be good at your job, if you want to build a business, you got to do the work, even when the work is not that much fun to do. So the question is, if we know what to do, why don't we do it? And how amazing would our lives be if we simply followed through on everything that it was that we said we would do. And so that was really the goal with indestructible. So to define what it means to be indestructible, being in distractible means you strive to do what you say you're going to do. You are the kind of person who lives with personal integrity. You know, we would never imagine that it would be okay to lie to others. One of the worst things that anyone can call you is a liar. Yeah. And we would never do that to others, right? We wouldn't lie to your kids, you wouldn't lie to your best friends, you wouldn't lie to your parents. And yet we lie to ourselves all the time. We say we're going to work out. We say we're going to eat right. We don't. We say we're going to get to that big project. We have to work on it work, even that hard thing. We don't really want to do. But what check email or slack channels or scroll the Internet a bit. So that's really what being indestructible is about.

Jerry BEN Stanford Kate
A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Great Skin

Ask The Health Expert

01:00 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Great Skin

"Skin that ages faster than it should is no fun. And best yet, though, it's preventable. There are things we can do to prevent or slow down the signs of aging skin. So let me ask this. We all know it's normal to see changes in our skin as we age. But why is that normal? Now, first of all, we're all going to deal with some level of oxidative stress. And this is something that can age us faster if we have too much of it. Now I'm going to give you some examples, but first, let me explain this process. Oxidative stress happens when there's an imbalance of free radicals and antioxidants in your body. And too many free radicals do damage. So unless your body is able to maintain a balance between the antioxidants and free radicals, the way it works is that your cells produce free radicals during normal metabolic processes, but your cells also produce antioxidants in those antioxidants. They neutralize the free radicals.

A highlight from Holiday 2022 Reading

Another Mother Runner

06:42 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Holiday 2022 Reading

"Runner. This is Sarah Bowen Shea. I'm joined today by co host Ellison Weiss, hello Ellison. Oh, Sarah. Hello and how are you? I'm good, particularly now that we were laughing so much before we started recording. About the trials of getting old. The food traps in the teeth. Oh my God. We dropped in the teeth. I could get locked in this studio and not starve for 40 days because of old food. Yeah, and somebody here is a couple of years older than me had warned me about this about the time I think I've got a hit 55, about ten years ago or something like that. And I sort of thought, no, I've always had great teeth. No problem. Oh boy. Joke's on you. Yeah. Stuff came home to roost. It wasn't on my head. It was in my mouth. Oh my gosh, oh my gosh, I did find out, though, about these little things from a woman runner who helped name Paula, who helped us out at our Portland running retreat in October. And we were setting up and registrants were about to get there. Ten days were about to get there. And I'm like, oh my gosh, and we had just eaten salads for lunch. I have so much stuff in my teeth. And she's like, here, do you want to use it? And I forget what the term is. I forget what they are, those little tiny sort of look almost like Christmas trees. And they have floss in them that you can just whip out. Oh, you're not placards because those are the debate of my existence because I don't know what it is with Portland and you go running here. I don't know if you remember, but there was so many blackers on the road. Yes. It's like the new cigarette butt to throw out your window. No, these are, they look seriously like little tiny Christmas trees in that they are a little bit like a pipe cleaner, but they are kind of radiated or triangular shaped like a Christmas tree can be. And so they help massage your gums as well as boy, they can just go to town on getting stuff out between your teeth. Oh, really? All right, well, now that everybody is waiting, you're going to have to find out and post it. So now I need to post a picture exactly. It's stories. So now I keep them in my purse in my desk. Never without. Oh, that's a good one. That's a good one. That's a good one. In the car, I need to do that. Yeah. Oh yeah. Gosh. Oh boy. Oh boy. So we are recording this right after the holiday weekend because I'm headed to Austin for work. So, boy, I had a busy, busy weekend that had nothing to do with Thanksgiving or Black Friday shopping or anything. With the kids, the twins. It was so we're eagerly awaiting hearing about early decision at Occidental for Daphne. And then oxygen also in Los Angeles. And then with John, I have been helping him get all the pieces in place to apply to 17 schools. 17. 17 because no, he's not one of those kids who just can't decide where he wants to go, but he has to cast a really wide net because he wants to do either musical theater BFA or dance BFA. And there's no telling, you have to get into the college or school. And then you have to get into the BFA program. So yes, he's already been admitted to, I don't know, two or three colleges, but that's the easy part here. It's getting into the BFA program. Oh my goodness. Yes. I did not realize. Yeah, so right now, as we record, he's upstairs talking with the head of the dance and theater department at montclair state university in New Jersey, which is a school he applied to and auditioned for in Dallas a couple of weeks ago. Oh, he applied, yes, last evening to Carnegie Mellon. And he applied over the weekend to julliard, oh, so he saved some biggies for last. The final one, he is saving to do. I think he's going to do today because of the applications all have to be in by December 1st because that's when he needs to upload all his pre screen stuff to then they decide whether or not they're going to even let you audition for the program. So it is literally like a hurdles race. What's the last one? University of Southern California. Oh my gosh. So the only West Coast school and then he and Daphne would be his twin sister were both going to school in Los Angeles, which would make life easy and very nice. But I don't know. He saved the harder ones for last. I think USC has an acceptance rate of 16.1% to the college itself. That's not even to their BFA program. There'd be a program acceptance rate. I think is 3%. Oh my word. I'm Mike John. Somebody's got to get in. That's exactly right. That's exactly right. And there's no denying he has the talent. Oh, thanks. Thanks, thanks. Thanks, yes. Yes, yes, yes. Thank you. So just interesting all the range of questions and do schools need short essays. Do they not? I mean, they asked things everything from, oh, USC has kind of a rapid fire range of questions like what's your favorite snack, your favorite movie, your favorite book, favorite song, and no reason given just one question was, who would be your ideal roommate and why? So, okay, there was but I mean, I think you had to answer in, I think, 25 words or less or something. Gordon Ramsay, because then he wouldn't have to order any takeout. Yeah, but he'd have to listen to Gordon Ramsay yelling for a while he was eating incorrectly. That's what I thought. I thought, oh, you know, you could have found a nicer famous chef than Gordon Ramsay. Yeah. Ina garten. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Exactly. Yeah, and also it was because it could be an actual person alive or dead or a fictional character. So it was wide open. And he chose Gordon Ramsay. Yeah, and it's not like we watched top chef or MasterChef or whatever that show is called. I don't know where he pulled that one out of it. But that boy does order a lot of takeout. He was being pragmatic. Yeah. That's true.

Sarah Bowen Shea Ellison Weiss Hello Ellison Portland Dance And Theater Department Daphne Carnegie Mellon Paula Sarah USC West Coast School Los Angeles Montclair State University Mike John Austin Gordon Ramsay New Jersey Dallas
Zombie Virus (MM #4271)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Zombie Virus (MM #4271)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. To this day, people are arguing where COVID-19 came from. Was it created in a lab in China? Was it something else? But just saw a story the other day about a zombie virus. I thought to myself, okay, this is going to be fun. Well, it's not fun because it was from a scientific magazine that said, scientists have revived a dormant Siberian virus found in the permafrost that is 48,500 years old, and they want to try figuring out why it went dormant. Of course, people are saying, well, if you bring this back to life, couldn't it spread, couldn't it spawn, like the coronavirus? French scientists are working on it. So it hasn't come to America yet. But it's one of 9 types of viruses that have been resuscitated from Siberian permafrost samples in recent years. 7 of those viruses resuscitated for this study and two approximately 30,000 year old viruses were brought back to life by these same researchers. It's truly amazing what scientists can do, and what they are doing. But sometimes you really just don't want to know what's going on.

Kevin Mason Mason China America
A highlight from Dr. Andrew Newberg

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:14 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Dr. Andrew Newberg

"Checking out Wednesdays, we've got some shows there. They're up actually all, the previous shows are up to doctor dot com. That has been creating a bit of stir. We're talking to some controversial figures there. Not necessarily I agree with, but I feel like I had to talk to them and see what they have to say. And it's actually expanded my understanding of what happened through COVID so much of what was going on if you remember back in those days and I was like, what are we doing? What's happening? Why are we doing this? I'm starting to understand how it happened, why it happened. And some of the excesses of our complex bureaucracies in this country. Today, the guest is Andrew newberg. He's a neuroscientist who studies the relationship between brain and mental states, particularly. Let's see, where's the term I want to get it out here really? Hold on. Okay, here it is. Attempt to understand the nature of religious and spiritual practices and attitudes. That's where I'm looking for. Neuro theology is the word I was searching for. You can follow me Andrew and Andrew neuburg dot com and he also a Twitter at Andrew newburgh. The book, the varieties of spiritual experience, 21st century research and perspective. Outs in September. And contemporary psychology and neuroscience laboratories around the world learn about the profound inner events and it seems to me the last time a book was named a variety of spiritual experiences. It was probably William James that wrote that book, I'm guessing. This is probably the last time that title appeared on a book, no? I believe that's pretty much correct. Thanks again for having me on the program. But yes, that was the inspiration for this. We're big fans of William James's work. And if you're audience isn't totally familiar with William James, he was an incredible scholar and psychologist back about a hundred years ago. And as part of the different lectures, a very famous lecture series, he ultimately put together a book that was referred to his title was a variety of religious experience and we thought we should broaden it a little bit and give it a little bit of an update, a hundred years, some things have changed in that time frame. So yeah, it's fascinating. So we're talking about it. So weird to me that it's taken a hundred years to get here. And he was such a consummate, he was really a clinician. He sort of invented psychology. And he just was this great observer and with documented things without a lot of, I mean, he had some editorial detail, but he really was just giving it to you as close to the experience as he could give. And he went into the very spiritual experiences. He went there. He went everywhere. He was just not looking at Christianity. He was looking at, I think he looked all the eastern satori kinds of experiences and ultimate experiences and all that stuff, right? Yeah, absolutely. He really did cover a wide variety. I mean, I certainly had more of a Christian perspective to it, which was his area of foundation and his belief system that he came from, but definitely very open to the mystical. He talked a lot about that aspect of experiences. And talked a lot about some of the good and the bad experiences that people have and he would talk about chapters that were titled saintliness, for example. So some very interesting ways of thinking about it. But as you said also, I think one of the really important points about all of this is that it was, you know, it was based on what science could tell us in that time. And so it was very observational from talking to his clients, patients, people that he would meet people he would get to know about those people who had these kinds of experiences. And so while it was an incredible, it was really the first time that anybody kind of put all of this together and talked about religion and spirituality from that psychological and even to a certain extent a little bit of the neurological. He certainly had enough knowledge of brain functions and that there was a relationship going on there. But again, here we are now here we are a 120 some odd years later where we can say, all right, you know, what's on the, what are the brain scans look like of these individuals? What can we do a much more detailed evaluation of the kinds of experiences that people have and what they're like and how they affect people. So to really take what we thought was such a wonderful start, but obviously had its limitations being a hundred years ago to really try to advance this whole perspective on how we can understand this as you use the term neuro theological perspective, what's the relationship between the brain and those religious and spiritual experiences that people have and how can we use this to understand the importance of these experiences for people, how it affects their psyche, their psychology. So there's so much very exciting work that we have now been able to kind of work from and a big future as far as the research goes to. There's a lot for us to learn. All right, we got a lot to get to. And I don't want to belabor the historical too much. But I do want to really contextualize this for people as we move this forward.

William James Andrew Newberg Andrew Neuburg Andrew Newburgh Andrew Twitter
World Cup (MM #4269)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

World Cup (MM #4269)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason, the World Cup is underway and I know a lot of people are interested. A lot of people who are normally interested in soccer. And that confuses me, I'll be the first to admit, I'm not a big soccer fan. I saw my first soccer back in the 1970s when my dad was calling play by play for the naia champion Quincy college hawks. So I watched a bunch of games for those a couple of seasons he was doing that on the side. And I understand the game, but I don't understand the game. I've had friends who played for major college teams. I've got friends, kids, and relatives who play big time soccer. But I don't understand the fascination with the World Cup when you don't pay attention to soccer year round. I realize how big the World Cup is around the world. But the USA getting ready to play their third game today. And if they win, they move on. If they lose, they're out. And what's interesting to me, they haven't won a gamer lost a game yet. They've tied the first two. It's endurance, and I realize I'm never going to get it. I'm not watching. I don't understand it, but I know a lot of people who are.

Soccer Kevin Mason Quincy College Hawks World Cup Mason Naia USA
123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

"We'll lies down in the prone piloting position and takes control as best he can with his still developing uniquely designed technology. He source up to 400 feet and lands at a speed of almost 30 mph. We'll repeat the flight over and over. What a gratifying payoff for years of work. And yet, these gliding distances are a far cry off from the sustained controlled flight. These flight obsessed siblings really want. Packing up in the days to come to return to Ohio. They know they'll be back. This is but the first of many trips to kitty hawk for the Wright brothers.

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Ohio Wilbur Kitty Hawk Orville RON North Carolina Gale Bill Tate Devil Hills Kate Wright