Your Next Workout

Perfect for the gym, your daily run or any other exercise routine, these stories will keep your brain busy while your blood's pumping. Tune in to an eclectic mix of healthy living tips, the latest developments in science, a drop of history and a touch of self-help.

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

Bodies

02:55 min | just now

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

"No one talks to girls about their cervical fluid. It's like denying semen exists. It's denying that you sneeze and blow your nose. So your cervix do you know what your cervix is? This is me about four years ago. It's like taking a lesson with a woman named Tammy Rubin. She's a certified fertility awareness and reproductive health educator. I can't guarantee anything for you. I can just tell you the science and what I've learned and what I want to touch on. So the events leading up to finding Tammy a chronicled in the first episode of bodies, sex hurts. You can listen back if you want all the details, but to summarize, when I was 24, sex became painful. I told my doctor, but I was dismissed. And I was having a really negative impact on my relationship with my then boyfriend. And then, through a friend, I learned that it could be the birth control pill that was causing the pain. I'd been on the pill since I was 18 and never given a second thought. But then I started looking into it more and yes, painful sex, as well as low sex drive and trouble lubricating were all potential side effects of the pill. So I went to an o-b-gyn specialist who confirmed that it was indeed the pill that was causing my issues. He told me to stop taking the pill, use a topical hormonal gel to get my hormone levels back to normal and go to pelvic floor physical therapy. I did all three things and after about 6 months, the pain went away. And honestly, my sex drive was better than it had ever been. And so after I got off the pill, I did not want to take hormonal birth control again. But I didn't want to get pregnant either. Condoms are fine contraceptives for the time being, but they didn't seem like a sustainable solution for the rest of my reproductive life. I started researching and came across this thing called the fertility awareness method. And at first I was like so the rhythm method that very unscientific way of guessing where you're at in your cycle. But as I learned during my sessions with Tammy, it's not the same thing as the rhythm method. Once you see that fluid, the fertile window is opening. And the change in cervical fluid marks the beginning of your fertile time. Turns out my body and the body of anyone with a menstrual cycle since two major signals over the course of a cycle. And if you can learn to read those signs, you can figure out on your own when you're fertile and when you're not fertile. This truly blew my mind. And so for the final episode of season three, I wanted to devote this episode to the fertility awareness method. How it works, how it can be used for contraception, why it's vital information for people trying to get pregnant and why it especially matters for people with polycystic ovarian syndrome or PCOS. I'm Alison berenger and from KCRW, this is bodies. And a heads up,

Tammy Rubin Tammy Pcos Alison Berenger
A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

The Experiment

01:06 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

"Count one malice murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You're gonna ask whoever just made it out first. Last week, when a judge in Georgia read the verdict, in the trial of three men who killed ahmaud Arbery. An unarmed black man. Count two felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You might have noticed there was a legal principle. Count three felony murder. That was repeated. Count four. Felony murder. Over and over. Account 5. Felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. Count 6. Last spring we did a story about felony murder. A legal rule you might not have heard of, that's applied in all different situations. And depending on who you talk to, it's either a tool for reform, or a barbaric rule that should be abolished.

Travis Mcmichael Ahmaud Arbery Georgia
A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:51 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

"Hello from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manika. This month we're highlighting visionaries. Today we're talking about an artist who was known for her geometric woven wire sculptures. Ruth aiko asawa was born on January 24th, 1926, in Norwalk, California. Her parents were Japanese immigrants, and Ruth was the middle child of 7. In her early years, Ruth grew up on a farm. She worked before and after school to help out. Even then, she was practicing art. She later wrote, I used to sit on the back of the horse drawn leveler with my bare feet drawing forms in the sand, which later in life became the bulk of my sculptures. The start of World War II, uprooted Ruth and her family's lives. In February 1942, Ruth's father was arrested and was taken to an internment camp in New Mexico. A few months later, Ruth and her family were forced into an internment camp at a racetrack in Santa Anita California. During World War II, racism and paranoia led thousands of Japanese Americans to be taken from their homes and imprisoned. Ruth and her family lived in horse stables at the Santa Anita race track for 6 months. The stench of horse manure was pervasive. During that time, three Disney animators were also being interned at the camp. Ruth spent much of her time drawing with them. By September of 1942, Ruth and her family were sent to another camp in Arkansas. There she continued to draw and paint and finished high school. In 1943, Ruth was allowed to leave the camp and went to college at the Milwaukee state teachers college. She'd received a scholarship from the quakers to study to become an art teacher. When she graduated in 1946, racism towards Japanese Americans was still rampant. Because of that, Ruth wasn't able to find work as a student teacher. She never graduated, but years later, when Ruth had established herself as an artist, the Milwaukee state teachers college wanted to recognize her as an alumna. She responded, requesting the degree she was denied. She finally received it in 1998. Instead of becoming an art teacher, Ruth was encouraged by some artist friends to study at black mountain college in North Carolina, a progressive art school in the segregated south. Ruth studied with artists like buckminster fuller and Joseph Albers. In 1947, Ruth traveled to Mexico and watched as a craftsman used wire to make egg baskets. Ruth would build upon this repetitive looping method to create her own style of sculpture. During that same period, Ruth also met her husband a black mountain college, Albert Lanier. They got married in 1949 and moved to San Francisco to live in a community that accepted them as an interracial couple. Over the course of 9 years, they had 6 children. Busy raising a family, Ruth worked on her art practice in the evenings at her home studio. She was inspired by the undulating form she found in nature, trying to give structure to what she was painting. Her hanging sculptures became increasingly intricate over the years. The suspended Arri woven structures of Ruth's work blur the lines between internal and external and cast haunting shadows. Always begin from the inside working inside. And I'm working on the surfaces, the things that interest me are the proportions that I see. And that shape by itself is not very interesting, but when I put one next to it, then I look at this shape that is out here. Throughout the 1950s, Ruth's sculptures were shown in group and solo exhibitions in New York, San Francisco and internationally. By 1963, Ruth began working on public artwork and arts advocacy. She believed art is for everybody. One of her early public pieces was a fountain featuring two mermaids in ghirardelli square in San Francisco. It still stands there today. In 1968, Ruth cofounded a public arts program called the alvarado school arts workshop. Without much funding, they cobbled together a hands on curriculum with scraps of yarn, bakers clay, an old egg cartons. At the height of the program, it was in 50 public schools, employing artists, and getting parents involved in their kids education. Ruth was inspired by her time at black mountain college and felt strongly that students would benefit from learning from artists. She expanded on this mission by opening a public arts high school in San Francisco in 1982. In 2010, the school would be named in her honor. In appreciation of Ruth's work as an artist and teacher, the city of San Francisco deemed February 12th, 1982, Ruth asawa day. When Ruth was in her 60s, she revisited her experience living in internment camps. As a memorial, she created a bronze relief, depicting scenes of what life was like for her and her family, as well as for the broader Japanese American population. Ruth died on August 6th, 2013. She was 87 years old. Ruth's legacy of art and education lives on. Her artist featured in galleries and museums around the world, and she's become known as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century.

Ruth Milwaukee State Teachers Colle Jenny Kaplan Manika Ruth Aiko Asawa Santa Anita Black Mountain College Disney Animators Joseph Albers California Albert Lanier Norwalk San Francisco Paranoia New Mexico Buckminster Fuller Arkansas Alvarado School North Carolina Mexico
A highlight from Q&A 437: Are Eggs & Salt Good Or Bad For You, Antibiotics Confusion, Gluten-Free Diets, Appetite Control, The Latest On Testosterone & Much More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

03:16 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Q&A 437: Are Eggs & Salt Good Or Bad For You, Antibiotics Confusion, Gluten-Free Diets, Appetite Control, The Latest On Testosterone & Much More!

"You know, I have to have some kind of pomp and circumstance or a drum like drum roll leading into today's show because frankly, I need to kind of amp it up 'cause it's just me. Just a little old me here with you today. I have no podcast sidekick. I have no Clubhouse audience. All of that kind of got shoved to the wayside. Well, frankly, because I had a technical issue with Clubhouse, namely I couldn't log into it for today's live Q&A, which we do a couple of times a month. And also because I was brining a turkey. Yeah, I got up early this morning and kind of ran out of time to do my official podcast Q&A. I knew what it was going to be late as I hovered over the stove top with peppercorns and rosemary and zest of an orange pill and lemons and what else did I put in there? Gosh, garlic, salt, brown sugar, and you heat all that up. You heat all that up in a giant pot over the stove and then you take your turkey and once that brining liquid has cooled off, you put your turkey in it and you put your turkey in it for about 24 hours. That turkey just went in there about 20 minutes ago. And then tomorrow morning, 24 hours later, I'll take it out. I'll put it on the trager. I'll smoke it for about four hours, about a 175° with pecan pellets and then I will finish it off with a final roast for a couple of hours and of course the key here. I hope you're tuning in if you're a turkey person. The key is that right before you, you put it into the smoker and right after you've taken it out of the brine, which allows you to get this super crispy skin and tender moist inner meat. You stuff all of the inside of the skin with pads of grass fed grass finished butter. Literally, like a surgeon, a chef's surgeon, you cut tiny little slits in the skin around the turkey and you stuff each of those slits with butter just pure butter or as Julia Child would say. Butter. And in man oh man, it's gonna be a good turkey. It's pretty much exactly what I did last year in the general consensus among my Thanksgiving Day feast attendees was that it was a good turkey. It was a good turkey. Some said it was the best turkey. Either way, it'll be good. Happy Thanksgiving, everybody. This podcast is coming out a little bit after Thanksgiving, but nonetheless, at the time that I'm recording this for you, Thanksgiving is too morrow. And I am not one of those guys who takes a whole bunch of time off over the holidays and I wanted to get a podcast out to you because holy cow, there's been a lot going on in the news in nutrition news and longevity news and exercise news and so I have a whole bunch of cool little things that I wanna tackle with you today. This is gonna be like a giant

Julia Child Morrow
A highlight from Future of NFTs with Avery Akkineni

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:38 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Future of NFTs with Avery Akkineni

"This day and age, if you're strategizing for three or four months, let alone three or four years, like you've already missed your opportunity, like it's gone by because things are moving so fast. And I can't tell you the amount of people that have come up to me and say, John, I literally thought of Uber before Uber launched, or I thought of Airbnb before Airbnb. I'm like, so where's your execution? Where's the execution? Exactly. Just wasn't there. Yeah, you should have launched it. Should have launched it. So at wiener NFT, you help other people unlock the potential of one of the greatest technology shifts that we are experiencing. This is literally the greatest technology shift of our time. Can you share some of the details about this shift? We believe that web three is going to be a transformative technological change for everyone. The same way the Internet was a major change. Fundamentally shifting the way that people interacted with content, communication, payments, travel, et cetera, et cetera. We think the same is going to be true of web three and NFTs are the gateway into web three NFTs fundamentally are the first way that you can actually own a digital asset and that's a big mind shift for a lot of people. And it's our great pleasure and opportunity and challenge and joy to be helping some of the world's biggest intellectual property owners figure out this wonderful new world of NFTs and web three and create programs that engage their communities inspire their communities and let them interact in a new way as we kind of start this ascent into this wonderful new technology transformation. Can you give a couple examples of people that you're helping right now at Vayner NFT? And we can get as vague or specific as you're able or willing to do. We can, again, just kind of be very broad stroke here and not name names. But we'd love to hear maybe a couple examples of real world. We work with a couple of different groups. First, celebrities and sort of people of interest, whether they're influencers or more traditional and mainstream celebrities who have engaged audiences, maybe they've become successful via social media or via other more traditional channels. We help them engage with NFT programs that engage their communities in a new way. So that's one group. And I'll give you an example. One of our first projects was the world's largest YouTuber with over 200 million subscribers. She's 7 years old and we helped her launch her first NFT project a couple of months back and we're now working on a whole new program that's going to be a new way for her to engage with her community and fan base. So that's one example. We also have examples of brand partners or working with Budweiser and Stella artois and Corona and everyone in the Anheuser Busch family to launch brand programs, which allow their communities in new way to collect and to engage with the brands. And just last Friday, a couple of days ago, we did a really fun collaboration with Tom Sachs rocket factory. I thought it was actually purchased a rocket from Tom Sachs, who's a contemporary artist who's launched a very successful NFT program. We then invited Tom and his team to launch the rockets from Budweiser headquarters and hosted some of Tom's fans and collectors and Budweiser fans and collectors there in an exclusive NFT event, which included special tour of the brewery and some exclusive merch and fun stuff of that nature. And then we also work with platforms like we work with coinbase and launching their new NFT offerings, so we're in the midst of that right now, which is very exciting. We believe this isn't a whole new platform that's going to bring way more people into the wonderful world of NFTs. And we also work with association. So folks like the U.S. tennis association on celebrating remarkable achievements of their players at their iconic event, which is the U.S. open. We didn't really awesome program there, which included elements of both free NFTs, low cost NFTs that are collectibles and in that golden ace at sort of trading card NFTs, which unlocked these incredible experiences that only U.S. open in their tennis legends could provide. We also work with folks like artists, we're working with a renowned photographer and artist called David Drummond on launching something really fun in art Basel. And yeah, that's all in a day's work. Well, I want to keep talking about the future of NFTs because this is all very fascinating to me. I want to really get into how they're becoming a game changer. And we're talking right now specifically for brands, specifically for IP owners. What are you seeing that's going to be happening in the future going forward? Anesthesia are fundamentally so different from a marketing campaign that it's a very new thing for brands because I've spent a lot of my career in marketing where we thought, you know, we're launching a new product or a new line or something like that and campaigns were one, very localized to specific markets because the products might only be available in certain countries. And then two, they were very temporary. It was only meant to be the message for a few months, a specific campaign thing. NFTs are different. And I have to use our inherently global and they're inherently forever. And that's a huge mindset shift for brands. And we're coaching a lot of our brand partners to think about NFTs way beyond a campaign, way beyond in our media moment really is something that is a new kind of a business for them that requires always on support and always on surprising delight of their fan bases and communities and really an investment in both time and resources to make them really successful.

Tom Sachs Airbnb Anheuser Busch Budweiser U.S. Tennis Association Stella Artois TOM John Corona David Drummond U.S. Basel Tennis
A highlight from Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

08:04 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

"To health and our lead question today is about blood pressure and the foods that can help to lower it naturally. What foods are they? We're going to find out in just a moment when we are joined by doctor Neal Barnard, and we're also going to be talking about the foods that you're going to want to avoid when it comes to high blood pressure. What are the ones that you want to take off of your plate to bring that blood pressure down? We're going to find that out. And also, can you lower blood pressure just by taking table salt off of the table? We're going to get that answer as well. And then on a different note, we're also going to be talking about what we know so far about vegan diets and the acron variant. You know, it's still very much too early to know for certain, much of anything, but doctor Barnard will share where we think diet and acron will shake out in the end. And we also have questions today about flax and chia seeds and omega threes and nuts and whether they can thicken the blood. That's an interesting question. But before we bounce around, I wanted to share a couple of points with you about hypertension. You know, it affects nearly half of all adults in the United States, and perhaps, because it is so common that it often goes overlooked, it's just accepted as the norm, and yet high blood pressure was at the very least a contributing factor in more than a half a million deaths in 2019. And the price tag that is associated with high blood pressure, I mean, this is something that can give anybody sticker shock. We're talking about 131 billion dollars every year, according to the CDC. 131 billion. Just to treat high blood pressure. So we're going to talk about ways that we can flip that script in just a moment. But before we do, I wanted to say a special thank you to the Gregory J rider memorial fund for helping us to raise our health IQ today. Their support of the exam room podcast is making this episode possible. The Gregory J rider memorial fund supports organizations like the physicians committee that carry on the love that Greg had for animals by promoting plant based health and working to end animal abuse. And you can visit the Gregory J rider memorial fund online right now at Gregory writer fund dot org. That's Gregory. REI, TER fund dot org sign up for their newsletter and learn about everything that they're working on. Okay, time now to see if we can offer up some help with hypertension, bring down those sky high rates and astronomical costs by addressing the root cause of the issue. And for that, we welcome doctor Neal Barnard. My friend so good to see you again. Good to see you, chuck. A high blood pressure when I was looking at up for today's show. I was stunned to hear that nearly half of all adults in the U.S. have it. What is the current criteria, the clinical criteria for high blood pressure? Yeah, but by the way, back to where you were starting about why this is such a terrible thing. So it's why it's so expensive. It's not really that people have to go and buy blood pressure pills. That's a big part of it. They are pricey and often you're on two pills or three. But the thing about it is it affects your heart. And it affects your kidneys. It affects other parts of your health. So all the health costs that you need to treat all those things. Those are all adding up into that astronomical figure. It's not just the blood pressure itself. But the criteria that we want to aim for is a 120 over 80. That's a good one, and it's been around for a long time and there have been mild adjustments here and there to it, but that's still a good number. And what that number means is that the doctor nurse medical technician or yourself, you put the cuff around your arm. And the blood pressure will go up to one 20 and down to 80 with each heartbeat. When your heart is contracting, it goes up to one 20 when it's relaxing, goes down to 80. That's systolic, diastolic. Systolic diastolic. One 20 down to 80. If you are higher than that with either one of those measurements, we're going to say that's higher. And higher than it should be. And we want to bring it down. A lot of people will say, well, gee, you know, I changed my diet. I'm way below that. I'm now a hundred over 65 or something like that is that dangerous. The answer is if you're a healthy person, no lower blood pressure is a good thing to be a good place to be. All right. Well, let's go ahead and see if we can't bring that blood pressure down our first question comes to us from tessie, who was wondering what are the best foods to lower high blood pressure? Ah, great question. So what can we do about it? There are really a couple of different strategies that we're aiming for when we're picking foods. The first one you already know about. We want to get away from high sodium foods. And get toward high potassium foods. Sodium brings blood pressure up, potassium brings it down. We also want to get away from high fat foods and go toward low fat foods, fat brings blood pressure up to because it makes the blood thicker, more viscous, harder to move, and that raises blood pressure. And the final thing, the third thing, is foods that help you lose weight. So low fat, vegan, high fiber foods, those are hot. So what specifically are we thinking about? All right, I want to have a food that doesn't have a lot of fat. Doesn't have a lot of sodium has a lot of potassium. Vegetables, fruits. Whole range, they're going to be your very best Friends. Along with them are the bean group and the whole grain group. What are the worst? Okay, the three worst foods are cheese, cheese, and cheese. Three I was saying that is that it's really high in saturated fat. It's got sodium too. Hold on to your blood pressure. If I have potato chips, two ounces of potato chips, 330 milligrams of sodium in that back. If I have some Cheddar, it's got more sodium. Yes, it has more sodium than potato chips. Three 50 if it's Velveeta, it's 800 milligrams of sodium. In two ounces. So get away from the cheese. Get away from the meats in general. So vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, get away from the animal products. Oh, by the way, one other thing. Coconut oil, palm oil, have been marketed a lot, throw them out, shine your shoes with them, don't eat them. You know, you mentioned potato chips. Just a minute ago. I'm glad that you did because we have a question from Sabrina. Potato chips absolutely a vegan food, and if you spend any time in the grocery store recently, you've noticed that there are more and more vegan options on store shelves. But Sabrina is wondering, can those processed vegan foods like the ones you find in the frozen food aisle? Also raise blood pressure. They can if you did one of the things that we were talking about, added a whole bunch of sodium. Or added a lot of bad fats. Those are the two ways to ruin it. Now, processing itself gets a bad name, but it's not such a terrible thing. If you take a grain of wheat, grind it up into flour and you make spaghetti out of it. That's fine. As long as you're not putting something bad on top of your spaghetti, that's a perfectly fine food, even though it's processed. Where we run into trouble is when people start adding a lot of sodium and a lot of fatty foods, especially the coconut palm oil, that's when you're really running into trouble. Let's take a question from Andre. This is a really good one and I think it's something that a lot of people do immediately when they're told that they have a high blood pressure. It's the first thing that they do. Andre is wondering, is cutting out

Neal Barnard Gregory J Rider Memorial Fund Gregory J Rider Memorial Fund Physicians Committee Gregory J Rider Memorial Hypertension Barnard United States CDC Gregory Greg Chuck Tessie Sabrina Andre
A highlight from 2183: On The Importance of Trying New Things by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Curiosity & Courage

Optimal Living Daily

01:10 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 2183: On The Importance of Trying New Things by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Curiosity & Courage

"Are you the best blogs that I can get permission from? To you, covering productivity, minimalism, personal development, all that fun stuff. And with that, let's get right to another post, and start optimizing your life. On the importance of trying new things, by a land massacre of free to pursue dot com. How often do you try something new? Every year, every month, every week, likely the answer is not often. I don't know about you, but I feel like standing still makes my brain rot. Period. Keeping abilities, experiences, likes and dislikes, views, and beliefs, constant, stunts are growth as individuals. The familiar becomes too comfortable and starts feeling like it is the only way life can be. Just give a thought to who you admire most, the people you find interesting, intelligent and insightful. I guarantee they do not follow a predictable routine and thought and action, and if they do currently, it's not likely to be for long. In my experience, the benefits of continuously increasing my willingness to try new things, are numerous.

A highlight from Do You Think Like a Happy Person?

The Daily Boost

01:32 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Do You Think Like a Happy Person?

"Nobody's coming to help you do anything different. You have to do it yourself. So it is. If your positive person, you know that already, if you're negative, you're like, it shouldn't be that way. Don't do that. Step up. Do you have a brilliant mindset for everything that life throws at you? I think you do. Let me give you another clarity of that as well. Another learning if you will. I'll bring in mindset meeting any challenge comes your way up. Bring it, let's do this thing. That's cool. But I'm gonna give you the advanced version of the brink and let's do this thing. For those of you who recognize that sometimes in life, that's not a good idea. Maybe I shouldn't have done that. So for the things that mean something to you for the things that are important, you know, that you've got to bring it, you've got to turn into to give it your all self a 1000% and go after it. Yes, do you have a brilliant mindset? A happy person does. Okay, let's do this thing. But a happy person also says, well, I gotta bring up mindset, but I'm bringing it to that. Some rules understanding who you are. Understand what makes you happy. Understand that whatever the world brings your way, you're going to deal with it a happy upbeat way, but it doesn't mean you have to, right? That would be silly. There'd be another podcast that I don't do. If you are expecting a great night's sleep tonight, no matter what happened today and no matter what tomorrow will bring, I am guessing you're kind of a happy person.

A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

The $100 MBA Show

02:04 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

"No money is coming in, but money is going out. So initially, we started with a free 14 day trial. One of the things that we really believe in in our company is that you need to be close to the customer. So we do as many customer interviews as possible. We've talked to our customers who do surveys. We run webinars, and in that process, what we've learned over the years is that people need more time. 14 days is just not enough for them to evaluate their webinar software to figure out if it's a good fit for them to actually get a webinar up and running with their content and their slides and everything. And no, hey, this is a solution for me. And we would get that feedback in our cancellation feedback. When people cancel their account, we have a process where we collect feedback. It's like a survey when they cancel their account. In those surveys, many people would say, you know, I didn't use it or to have a chance to do it, or I needed more time. So I'll be back. So we were faced with the dilemma, okay, we have this free trial where it gives them all the power, all the solutions they need, all the features, but they have 14 days to decide. After the 14 days, they will be charged for their plan. So hence they might cancel before the 14 days so they don't get charged for something they're not sure about yet. Sounds reasonable. So what are the options for us? And let me just tell you that successful businesses don't work alone. We learned that we don't have all the answers. So we reached out to people that do have the answers. We reach out to pricing experts and freemium experts like Patrick Campbell from prophet who was generous enough to coach us on this. We reached out to Marcus Rivera, who is the founder of pricing IO. Also gave us some really solid advice when it comes to freemium. And what they all said, these experts is that if you're going to go freelance, understand this is a customer acquisition model and not a pricing model. Meaning, you've got to see this as sort of like a glorified opt in, a way to get really good leads. You're paying for these leads by offering your software. And that's really

Marcus Rivera Patrick Campbell
A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

Tara Brach

04:23 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

"In these heart practices, we're really moving from this realm of thinking. Conceptual to the heart and keeping the heart in the body at the center of awareness as a way of homecoming. It has to be an aesthetic. This particular practice today will be really emphasizing goodness. Because of our negativity bias, we don't really immerse and take in and sense the feeling of what it's like to observe goodness in ourselves or others. And with ourselves we rarely acknowledge it, we're so organized around what's wrong. So that's where we'll pay attention today. Rumi says whenever some kindness comes to you, turn that way toward the source of kindness. So we'll be looking for the source of loving and turning in that direction. Finding a posture that allows you to be alert sitting upright and also at ease. This is a way of initially collecting your attention. You might take a nice full deep in breath. And then a slow out breath slow enough so you can feel the sensations leaving the nostrils. And then another nice long deep in breath. Slow out breath, letting go. Letting go. One more time, deep full in breath. And slow out, breath. Relaxing outward. Letting the breath resume, and it's natural rhythm. Noticing the quality of presence. It's right here. From that space of presence sensing your most sincere intention. For this practice. As a way of creating a receptivity and openness in the body, I'd like to do a classical pre meta practice in a way it's a body meta practice of the smile down. Begin by a great smile spreading through the sky. Just vast that great sky that's out there just spreading through it. The uplift of a smile. You can imagine the mind and the sky emerging so that the mind is filled with that uplift curve, openness of a smile. Letting the smile spread through the eyes, lifting the outer corners of the eyes. Softening the eyes. Letting the brow be smooth. Sensing the mouth, slight smile. Just directly helps to quiet the

Rumi
A highlight from 1697: HIIT Training Doesnt Work (Unless You Follow These Steps)

Mind Pump

04:18 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 1697: HIIT Training Doesnt Work (Unless You Follow These Steps)

"Boys, we are entering into hit training season. I think this is when everybody starts or it's close soon. Everybody starts to hit it. That's actually an interesting point. Do you think that we are heading into the most popular time for it or do you think it is heading into like springtime? No, I think so because yeah, after the holidays, it's like everybody gets in this hustle of like, oh no, I need to do something about this and what's the quickest way I can lose weight? Yeah, I remember specifically, so I started training professionally, I guess, as I was a kid, right? So 1997 or 98, I started working in gyms and hit didn't exist, right? The acronym high intensity interval training wasn't a thing. Cardio was doing the StairMaster or the treadmill or the bike. In fact, ellipticals I don't even think existed at that time. And that was that. And then I remember, I don't remember when this happened. I want to one O two. Early 2002 1001. The reason why I remember so vividly is because I was a new trainer. I was pretty brand. And I was like, maybe a year or two in the business and maybe like we could probably go back and fact check me on things when it really started to I mean, maybe it started before, but it became popular. Yeah. 'cause I was in the gyms. I was working in gyms in 2000 and it wasn't but a year or two later did it become like and being completely transparent. I train like every fucking client hit for like a year. Everybody didn't matter your goal did everyone build muscle, lose body fat. All of the current studies that were being touted at that time were related to hit and all its benefits. Well, I remember specifically there was one study that is the reason why every trainer did this, especially new trainers. The experience trainers didn't. I do remember that. It was all of us new trainers, but there was a study that came out that showed that something like 15 minutes or 20 minutes of hit training was as effective as I don't remember. I mean to throw out a number of some like an hour worth of traditional steady state cardio. So all of a sudden everybody was like, oh my gosh, I could get the same potential calorie burning effect or fat loss effect or whatever with a less than half of the time. And so it just became this huge thing and it was probably early 2000s. I didn't remember that. And I remember all of a sudden, nobody did traditional cardio. Everybody was doing hit training. I do remember the two that study, the one I read at least was very controlled. It had a guy on a bike. And it wasn't an assault bike. It was something very similar to that where they were doing just constant sprints and then they would rest for a brief minute. They would do sprints again. So it was like, it was different than what all of a sudden hit became. But that was definitely the study that then a lot of trainers used to justify these so that's interesting that we all remember different studies. So I remember the muscle sparing one. Yes. I remember the research that was done around how muscle sparing it was like, and what you could do this cardio burn the most amount of time, but then because here's the thing, I remember being the skinny kid trying to build muscle. I didn't want to lose muscle. So cardio was like just not happening. And so when this study came out and said, wow, I could do this cardio and actually not lose muscle that it was the most muscle sparing way for you to do cardio. That's what triggered it for me or at least what I remember. Now Doug just pulled up a article that said this was popular in the 70s. I call bullshit. Well, they didn't call it hit training, I don't think. I think they might have called you know what? I mean, we should credit the coach who did it, right? So it's coach Peter co is supposedly the first person to really make it popular, but it wasn't popular then. It wasn't when we know there's no work when I was in high school and we were lifting weights like I never even heard the term hit until the 2000. You know, the closest thing I remember that was old and I only remember this because the name was so funny as a kid. I thought it was hilarious. Fart lek. You know what? Fort licking is? It's like that. You run, and then you walk. Wait, wait, go back, go back down. It says Arthur Jones. Should you bring that back? Go up right there right there. Oh, see, Arthur Jones, no. His was high intensity training, not high intensity interval training. So Arthur drones is the one that pioneered. One set to failure. The famous Casey valet or study the Denver project. He was a known for hit. No, he was not known for him.

Peter Co Fort Licking Doug Arthur Jones Casey Valet Arthur Denver
A highlight from S13E16: How To Have A Healthy Relationship w/ Connor Beaton & Vienna Pharaon

Dateable Podcast

03:25 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from S13E16: How To Have A Healthy Relationship w/ Connor Beaton & Vienna Pharaon

"The podcast is an insider's look into modern dating that The Huffington Post calls one of the top ten podcasts about love and sex. On each episode, we'll talk to real daters about everything from sex parties to sex droughts, date fails to diaper fetishes and first moves to first loves. I'm your host ue shoe, former dating coach turned dating sociologist. You also hear from my co host and producer Julie Kraft chick as we explore this crazy dateable world. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of the dateable podcast where we are full and we are ready to tackle the rest of the year. Now that we're done with Thanksgiving, this is where all the holiday shit starts happening, right? This is the beginning of it all, and it's also the beginning of cuffing season. Oh, yes. We are here to help you. Through cuffing season, consider us your sherpas through all the cuffing that's about to happen. Relationships, they begin and they end around the holidays. We know because we've both been there. And that is our mission with a table podcast. Let's get to the bottom of these behaviors and patterns that we see. And so we can be better equipped for when things happen. And we are so excited about our episode today. We are talking about what it means to have a healthy relationship. So we have back a fan favorite. We have Connor beatin. He was on season 12 episode one socially distant yet eventually available, one of our top rated episodes, I believe. And we are lucky to have him joined by his wife, Vienna ferrin, who is a very popular marriage and family therapist of mindful MFT. So we're super excited to have both of them together. And I think this concept of healthy relationship is something that's tossed around a lot. We've definitely said that before, because I think a big part of dateable is that we want to create the relationships that work for us ultimately. And a lot of us don't want to repeat our family, our parents, relationship, potentially, divorces that have happened. I think we're all kind of out there to have a healthy relationship. That's a term that gets maybe as buzzed as emotionally available at another probably neck and neck this, too. It's also kind of like saying I'm looking for a nice person to date. It's like it's the status quo. You should be wanting a healthy relationship. And if you do have a healthy relationship, it shouldn't feel like your unicorn. Yeah. That should be what all of us are in is a healthy relationship, but why is this so hard to identify what a healthy relationship is? Is, for example, some of us didn't grow up with great examples. I'm a good relationship is you don't understand what healthy you have a means for me. I had no idea what love even meant 'cause that was never a word that was used in my family. And so when you have to relearn all of this from the beginning, it's a really scary thing. It's also very exciting because it means you get to carve out what it means to have a healthy relationship for you specifically. Yeah, I mean, I think modern data is extremely dysfunctional also. So I think thank you. Thank you, Monday. Obvious. Without you, there wouldn't be us. But I think that's why would you do there is this your site is set on a healthy relationship.

Julie Kraft Connor Beatin Vienna Ferrin Huffington Post
A highlight from Whats Your Sexual Fantasy?

Sex With Emily

01:08 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Whats Your Sexual Fantasy?

"People have been asking me, so what's changed after 15 years of doing the podcast? Well, a lot has, but to be honest, the orgasm gap still remains a challenge for so many couples. You know what I'm talking about? Men tend to finish before their female partners. So you've heard me talk about promethean for years, so urologists developed FDA compliant delay spray can help men last up to 64% longer without loss of sensation, and because promession is quickly absorbed into the penis, it won't transfer to your partner. Oh, and speaking of your partner, I think we can all agree that sometimes women, even when alone still have challenges around reaching orgasm. So now, promession is created a new female arousal gel. I love it. It's a clitoral stimulant she can rub into her clitoris for grease pleasure and a lot more satisfaction during pretty much any sexual activity you can think of. So now, they got promes and delay space for ham, arousal gel for her, so basically they're closing the orgasm gap on both sides. Trust me, try this combo thank me later. Seriously, right into feedback at sex with Emily dot com and tell me how it went. I want to know. So try for message today. Go to sex with Emily dot com slash enhance. That's my site sex with Emily dot

FDA Emily Emily Dot
A highlight from Savage Lovecast Episode 788

Savage Lovecast

02:40 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Savage Lovecast Episode 788

"Denver riggleman was a very conservative Republican from Virginia, and still is a very conservative Republican from Virginia, a state that was trending blue until the recent unpleasantness. Riggleman was a member of the rapidly conservative house freedom caucus. Those were the Tea Party crazies who now seem positively sane compared to the Trumpist crazies. And then rigelman made the mistake of officiating at a gay friend's wedding and social conservatives freaked the fuck out, funded a primary challenger and rigid lost his seat in 2020 despite being endorsed. By Donald Trump rona Romney mcdaniel, she's the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee and Mitt Romney's niece because we live in a meritocracy. Never forgot that we live in a meritocracy. Anyway, last month, mcdaniel rolled out a big new campaign to attract low information LGBT voters to the GOP. She called it the RNC pride coalition. And days later, mcdaniel had to issue a shit eating apology because social conservatives were demanding her resignation. The RNC pride coalition, which was her idea, was quietly euthanized and mcdaniel sent an email out to social conservatives, reaffirming the Republican Party's opposition to same sex marriage, as well as its support for dismantling anti discrimination statutes that protect LGBT people from discrimination. Just so we're clear on who and what the GOP is where queer people are concerned. They hate us. Still. And yet, every four years, every two years, every 6 months, the LGBT community gets gaslit. By bullshitting self paid and gay conservatives and mainstream media outlets looking for a new story to tell and the story they like to tell us, constantly is that gee whiz, maybe today's GOP isn't as anti gay or anti queer or anti trans as it once was. Yeah, no. They're still anti LGBTs to anti gays to antique queers to anti trans. If anything, the anti gay anti queer, anti trans rhetoric from the right, is getting worse, not better. Take, for example, North Carolina lieutenant governor, Mark Robinson. He is a rising star in the GOP. He's running for governor of North Carolina. And he's doing most of his campaigning from the pulpits of tax exempt churches that shouldn't be tax exempt. And Robinson is given the GOP base, what it wants. Anti gay, anti trans hate. There's no other word for it. You just give a sermon at the baptist church in Winston Salem in which he said, well, I'm not going to read it myself. It's on YouTube. Let's

Republican National Committee Riggleman Mcdaniel Rigelman Rona Romney Mcdaniel GOP Virginia Donald Trump Tea Party Denver Mitt Romney North Carolina Mark Robinson Robinson Winston Salem Baptist Church Youtube