Wellness

Listen to the latest on healthy living tips, the importance of keeping fit and how to manage the lifestyle you want, from audio aired on leading podcasts.

Finding that Relaxation Mode with Dr. V

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:43 min | 8 hrs ago

Finding that Relaxation Mode with Dr. V

"I'm so excited to be here with you into share some personal thoughts about my second healing journey and essential number four. Heal the emotional wounds now. When i was going through my second healing i recognized that there was the need to really take a deep dive. Into all of these central's the today. I'm going to talk specifically about essential number four because i feel that healing emotional wounds is often the most challenging part of healing. We are multitaskers. We are really good at taking care of people but we often tend to neglect ourselves. And we put ourselves last on the to-do list. And so i want to really encourage you to listen closely and if any of the things that i talk about really resonate with you i encourage you to ride them in your journal are riding on a post it note. But go back to this after you've listened to the podcast because these are the things that can truly be transformational. Remember that a breast cancer. Healing journey is not just about getting rid of the the lump or the cancer. But it's about a complete transformation of your life because what brought you to the point of developing breast cancer in the first place is what you need to change. So it's about transformation is like that cocoon the caterpillar cocoon to the butterfly. Its transformation now personally. My biggest takeaways from my healing journey as far as my emotions are concerned. Were two things number one. I recognized for the first time in my life what it was like to live in the relaxation response. All my life. I had my nose to the grindstone and i was a personality. Push push push. Even when i didn't physically feel like pushing. I would push my body to the point of a new my detriment now. Getting into the relaxation response is something that is so key because if we have our foot on the accelerator and we are activating the sympathetic nervous system. The fighter flight mode there studies that have shown us that that can literally trigger cancer genes to turn on and it increases the risk for metastasis. So that alone should be a motivation for you to look at essential number four and to learn to get into the relaxation response. I have trained my body and my mind that when i feel stress in my body i stop and i pulled back and i am. I really make the effort to go into that relaxation mode the second big takeaway for me on my second healing journey was that i now take the time to nurture that little girl. That little girl inside of me was very wounded. Little girl for decades not until late forties early fifties. Did i realize that. I was living the life of an adult but with the wounded child making those decisions for me and so now i take the time to do more things that bring me joy in that little girl joy and do more things that that bring pleasure because that's something that i neglected most of my life so when we talk about healing our emotions are several things we we want to look at first of all. If you're a good stuffer do you find that. You're always fine. Know people ask you how you doing on fine. That's what we call a good stuffer right. We we have feelings. We have thoughts. We have energy but we just keep swallowing swallowing swallowing. Because we don't wanna take the time to really take a look at what's what's happening. What's bothering us. There's a quote from dr lisa. Rankin that. I really like. When i read her book a mind over medicine and she says if you don't grow you grow a tumor. And that's so true because not internal conflicts that we have causes a stress response. You may not recognize it as a stress response. Perhaps you're used to living that way that tension that you have

Breast Cancer Cancer Dr Lisa Rankin
Fresh Take: Dr. Edward Hallowell on Renaming and Reframing ADHD

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

04:05 min | 3 d ago

Fresh Take: Dr. Edward Hallowell on Renaming and Reframing ADHD

"Book is all about sort of what's new in the field. Just the first thing. That's new in the book. Is we give the condition a new name. the name when i first learned about it in nineteen eighty one was called attention deficit disorder and then in the nineties. They threw in the eight so then it became attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And you know those are all out of the medical model which is rooted in pathology. You know you go to the doctor not because you feel well but because you feel bad. So it only stands to reason that medically based conditions would have a pathology slanted name so and that's fine but when it comes to this condition it's totally inaccurate and it also conveys a kind of stigma kind of shame kind of feeling less than and those are very damaging so it's more than just cosmetic it's more than just a semantics really gets right to the heart and mean you get this diagnosis. You're told you or your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And you feel like you've just been punched in the gut. You don't really know what it means but you know it's bad sounds bad so it must be. Yeah exactly and so the fact is the description is inaccurate. We have the condition myself. So i say we don't have a deficit of attention quite the opposite. We have an abundance of attention. Our problem is to control it and then the disorder. I don't see it as a disorder you know. I went to harvard college and medical school. I've written twenty one books. I've been married thirty one years. I've got three wonderful kids. That i don't have a disorder. I have a brain difference. And so i see it as a trait. If you manage it properly it becomes an asset. If you don't yes it can ruin your life so it has the potential to be a disorder but it also has the potential to be a superpower and so we've renamed it very abol attention stimulus trait vast via st and. I think it's a whole lot better to be told that your son or daughter or you have vast because it does imply the vast nature of this condition which is all encompassing and does not convey a sense of shame in pathology the way. Adhd does so and attention and stimulus of sort of the two key elements. you know. Our attention is always moving and so we have variable attention and then stimulus were always looking for high stimulation. we're always looking for something to pump. Up the volume. So variable attention. Stimulus trait vast. And we offer that as a way of for parents to convey to their kids they have avast mind. They have vast potential. They have vast opportunity all of which is true. And then the challenge to turn this. Trait asset is to learn to control attention stimulation so the first item in the book that we offer. That's new is the very word itself. Very term itself the acronym via st. I think it also brings us past what i think. Amy and i probably grew up with learning this term. Add and it's become this kind of major catchall for every range of behavior and then a lot of the discussions around are kind of like. Oh that's an. Add moment or everyone's medicating what used to be called childhood and those kind of discussions. That i think are not useful for anybody because they demonize kids who have maybe need help functioning and then they kind of lump everybody together in like this used to be childhood now. Everyone's just medicating zombies not true right. Not true at all and also as you say when it's used casually it's never complimentary exactly when you say he's so. Add he so creative original interesting and dynamic. You mean he's a pain in the butt you know and so you know we want to take it out of that stigmatized round where it does not deserve to be in. The fact of the matter is most of the people who are the game changers in this world have vast or adhd.

Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Harvard College And Medical Sc AMY
604 - Is It Time to Stop Taking Fish Oil?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:40 min | 6 d ago

604 - Is It Time to Stop Taking Fish Oil?

"Today. You have got the latest news on fish oil and the news is not super great at least not for those who health fish oil supplements the idea. That fish oil and omega threes are good for your heart has been nutrition orthodoxy for decades. Now a few dissident voices have argued that this particular emperor has no clothes but they've largely been drowned out by the crowd. Although fish consumption has increased a little bit. Most americans are still falling well short of the recommended two or more servings of fish per week and until recently health experts ranging university to the american heart association have recommended a fish. Oil supplement for those. Who aren't eating enough fish. As way to bridge that gap fish oil supplements are the third most commonly taken nutritional supplement. These days. there have been concerns about possible contaminants in commercial fish oil supplements as well as the potential negative effects of overfishing in order to produce an official to meet this demand but the presumed benefits have largely overshadowed these concerns. But just how firm is the evidence to support their use. Epidemiological studies have found that people who eat more fish or taken more omega threes through their diet have lower rates of death from cardiovascular and other diseases randomized trials have also established that fish oil supplements reduce inflammation and can help lower your triglycerides but as recently as twenty ten authors of scholarly article on fish oil for the treatment of cardiovascular disease conceded that quote the role of omega three fatty acids in reducing mortality sudden death myocardial infarction. That's heart attacks and heart. Failure has not yet been established and quote. That was twenty ten and over the years that followed trials showing that fish oil supplements did not in fact reduce the risk of heart attack or death started to pile up in twenty eighteen. Researchers published the result of a large meta analysis looking at ten different clinical trials in which people with heart disease or who are at high risk of developing it took either fisher supplements or placebo and overall they detect quote no significant association with fatal or nonfatal coronary heart disease or any major vascular events and quote and so the researchers concluded that there is quote no support for current recommendations for the use of such supplements in people with a history of coronary heart disease and quote and now even more recently in november twenty twenty researchers shared new data from a large placebo controlled trial involving thirteen thousand people who either had heart disease or were at high risk of developing it and this study involves subjects for more than twenty two different countries and these folks were taking a lot official four grams per day and unfortunately even at that dose the fish oil appeared to provide benefit in terms of reducing cardiac events and so all of the studies have mentioned so far. We're looking at people who either had heart disease or who were at elevated risk of developing it but what about people without a history or risk factors for heart disease could taking fish oil supplements keep them from developing heart disease in the first place. I know there are an awful lot of people in this category who are taking supplements in the hope that it might and unfortunately that is a question that has not been well studied in part because a trial to test that hypothesis would have to be very long and therefore extremely expensive. It is worth mentioning however that the potential benefits of mega threes are not limited to preventing heart disease. Omega threes may also play a role in reducing the risk of depression and cognitive decline. And they have been shown to reduce pain and stiffness for people with arthritis and other inflammatory conditions personally. I don't think we've overestimated the value of omega three fats but we may have underestimated the benefits of getting our omega three from whole foods instead of from supplements all the obsession with fish. Oil and omega threes began. When it was observed that indigenous people living in greenland had much lower rates of heart disease then danes who lived quite nearby the greenland inuit had much higher intakes of omega three but not from fish. Oil supplements the oily. Fish that they pull out of. The arctic waters was a staple of their traditional diet. They ate very little red meat or poultry the nearby danes on the other hand eight much less seafood and a lot more fresh and cured meat so giving omega three supplements to people who continue to eat a lot of beef or poultry or cured. Meat might not have the same effect as replacing some of that meat with fish in my thirty day. Nutrition upgrade program. Which many of you are doing with me right now. In january players earn points for eating fish on a given day but not for taking a fish oil supplement and this is because the benefits of our food choices are often not limited to the nutrients that we get from eating those foods. All of that's part of it but it's also something about what we're not eating because we're eating those foods

Heart Disease Heart Attacks Nonfatal Coronary Heart Diseas American Heart Association Coronary Heart Disease Greenland Inuit Arctic Waters Arthritis Depression Greenland
How to get a good night's sleep

The Emma Guns Show

08:26 min | Last week

How to get a good night's sleep

"You'll sleep isn't quite right harrison. Things i think might be helpful to just get things back on track and before we get into tips though i just wanted to say do you feel as though sleep is the first thing to go when we experienced any kind of stress for me. It's really good. And it's just an indicator that i have a few more taps open in my brain than i can adequately cope with and that means that my thoughts begin wearing at three o'clock in the morning or my quality of sleep over the course of an entire evening just isn't good enough and sometimes it can be just because i've got too much on my mind and this leads me nicely into one. So if you are waking up worrying and then it becomes impossible to switch off and go back to sleep or if you find it a struggle to get to sleep because you're thinking all the things a on your plate essentially then making a list of all of them making a list of everything that's on your mind before you go to bed might help. It's been proven. I've spoken to several sleep therapists and sleep. Experts said that just the act of making a list of all the things that you on your mind can take the magnitude out of these things that seem really big because you attach all the other things to it like. Oh i've got to my taxes for example. And if you don got to do. My taxes means speech my accountant. I get really stressed. When is mike has an all. Will he have time for me. All of those things actually making a less kind of gets rid of a lot of that chatter and just makes them feel much more doable and is also really good. The next morning right. That's my to do list. They were with me yesterday. They were my mind. I'm going to do something today to make sure that that's not worrying me tomorrow. And it's been proven that a few minutes of mindfulness can take the edge off and make it much much easier to fall asleep so if you get into bed you're white awake will now. What actually whether you use an up whether you use a prompt of some sort a youtube video just counting your breath and just slowing down your breathing. But if mindfulness whether it's guided or not can we really make that difference to just get in your mind and body out of that mode to. Yeah you know what yes sleep. The seem like a good idea but this is also one the idea of writing down your warriors the idea of organizing your worries into something that you can then work through methodically and logically. This is also what you can take a little bit of a run-up i wouldn't be doing it. I'm not talking about making a list bed but if you are lying awake thinking about paperwork finances or feel as though everything's calls nita's organized than actually some time in the day to do filing to file things properly to get on top of your admin or just create an organized environment where you know where everything is that can have a really positive. Knock on effect of softening those concerns when you're trying to get to sleep so okay. I know this might make me sound a bit weird. But if you're a long-time listener you'll be no stranger to that. But i leave my office night but only a my office being my second bedroom but i leave my every night but only once. I've made sure everything is tidy. So i my desk so i've got my record. I'm obviously recording right now. So all my recording equipment out of my wires everywhere. I make sure that then nicely neatly wound up and put back in the drawer where they are recording device back ninety degree angle on my desk and when i leave at the end of the evening i use my call brush to like clete to rake through the copy or vacuum the carpet and anything i've taken out or use during the day. I put it back to how. I would have it if i had guests coming over the next morning and mentally. It ends my working day really neatly but the payoff is the next day. I am always and i mean always delighted to what to set foot back in my office. It feels like oh this is this is a place. We're going to do really good work today. And i know i said you know. Make it presentable as if someone else's coming around to see it but i'm seeing it and it's important that i have that feeling and that genuinely when i wake up in the morning at i think goku can you office today. I'm actually excited to get into the office. So that has definitely been one of the things that i have started to incorporate in the last couple of years that makes all the difference. The second tip is this one might sound really obvious. but it's dope nap and maybe it sounds really obvious for me. Because i've been working from home for eight years and so i've learned the hard way but if you're working from home for the first time or maybe the third time if you're in the uk and you're on your third lockdown but if you now have been working from home for substantial amount of time since we went into various stages if restriction around the world then. It's definitely tempting to have a quick snooze when you normally pep yourself up with a coffee or sneaky chat with a colleague in the canteen or out for quick walk. Whatever but while we're living and working in the same space it's easy for entity to drop and to think fifty minutes won't hurt and oversee no one's gonna see no one's gonna see you have a quick nap who cares but unless you're a great napa and that awesome effective ways to make napping efficient and actually work for you but let's revisit those in another time when another episode then give napping a real mess so like i said i've been working from home now for nearly eight years and nothing is a very very easy to fall into trust me. I've done it so so many times. But now i make myself go outside and walk around the block. The truth is that my body saying oh we need to sleep or or wouldn't wouldn't not be nice but the truth is the thing that's going to serve me better. Brain and body is a stretch. Probably some fresh air or just moving around. Because i've been sitting at my desk for hours on end my my heart rates will be slowed down. And that's why my body's like we haven't done much moving. Let's go to sleep now. Moving around for a bit. Even if it's just in another room even a bit of yoga will actually support a better night's sleep or more likely likely give you a burst of energy so if you get that i that three o'clock low what you think all honestly i could just kick off my shoes now and i could just go and put my feet up on the so. I just have a quick nap. No i find. If i walk around the block i come back and where i think. I was almost ready to finish my day. I've definitely got another few hours in me. And it's extraordinary. How many good ideas pop into your head when you out for a walk or you're in a downward dog come on. Who else has been there where you at your desk all day even working team. I've got. I've got to have an idea for this or i've gotta to do this. And you're trying to troubleshoot something and you at your desk in your in work mode. It looks like you're working really hard. You get up. Have a cup of tea or take a walk around the block pops into your head. That's me clicking. By the way the idea pops into your head a little bit of movement london he makes the body feel good but can sometimes just be the little bit of the release. The brain needs in the way. That when you're thinking of a word and you think really hard and then the second you start thinking about it pops into your mouth that kind of thing. The third thing make a nest and i mean literally obviously but just make your bed the most comfortable place you spend time so that it's an environment that lends itself to sleep and this is really important if your sleep begins to go out of out of wack. This isn't just about having nice bedsheets about the lighting in the room the temperature. I know it might sound nuts. Especially right now because we're in the depths of winter but i from my window for about five to ten minutes before i get into bed because i love the air in the room being being a little bit chilly. So that when i'm under the covers i can feel nice and cozy and i usually fall asleep listening to a podcast on a very very low volume and i use an. I'm ask so. I've got myself sort of prompt in with Coin she pillows but you know how many close your own thing. But i have myself mostly packed in with some pillows. I put an moscow on. And i have a pug 'cause playing and i spritz my bed liberally with some really nice leap spray so i used the one from a remarked if i use the one from this. I loved the one from the sanctuary. I always put the podcast on auto turn off. Say that it'll finish the end of the episode that i'm listening to on it's rare. It's really read by more than ten minutes of a show so that really works for me so that is just an. I sent in the bed opening the window for five to ten minutes. So it's nice and cool making sure that my bet is really comfortable that i've light blocked out and i've just got something quiet and gentle to listen to. That will help me get to sleep

Clete Harrison Nita DON Goku Mike Youtube UK London Moscow
Embracing Self-Care with Mary Hyatt

The Get Foxy Show

09:59 min | Last week

Embracing Self-Care with Mary Hyatt

"You are a very multifaceted kind of person. You're you're a yoga instructor therapist. Your life coach. You are very knowledgeable about essential oils. How did you discover your strengths to did these things just kind of fall in your lap or how did this all come about for you. You know it's so fascinating. I think like when you hear. Somebody's resume or their out. And you're like wow like. They're an expert at xyz or whatever and yet at least for me which i would imagine. This is true for most people. It's like a journey. Along the way we start picking up these interests and facets of what is drawing your attention and for me. It was all from my own personal healing journey. And if we were to rewind the clock like eight years ago you would have a very different mary. I was about eighty pounds heavier than i am now. I was dealing with like really extreme anxiety and depression. I wasn't a marriage that was just not healthy and not ultimately life-giving and i really had no sense of purpose. No sense of identity and was dealing with autoimmune staff so it was like the culmination of somebody who has totally just lost themselves and i was almost like sleepwalking through life is what it felt like in so there was this moment. I can remember so clearly where it was like. Okay either this is going to go to a bad place really really quickly and it was already kind of spiraling in getting to that point. Or there's got to be more to life than this. Like surely little flicker of hope shirley there's more to life than this and thank god. I listened to that voice of. There's there's more here and started this journey of self discovery and started to come into. What made me come alive. And and authentic and learning about myself and learning about my own feminity and my own just essence as a woman and so little by little. I started kind of adding these different tools to my toolbox That me to do my own work. Further and then ultimately as a life coach now be able to give that gift as medicine two other women who've been on a similar journey so it's kind of like my own work that now gets to be given to others your podcast. I've tuned into a couple of episodes. You're actually right now at the time of this recording. Your your theme for the month is femininity. Yeah and i think that was one of the reasons why i was like okay. Wow when we're here on the get foxy show. That's one of the things that i felt like i wanted to do for my listeners. Was to help them. Learn more about cultivating an amplifying their own divinely given feminine entity and so. Oh mary she's she's she's Needs to be on this show. so what. What have you been discussing on your podcast over the last couple of weeks hot. Oh my gosh. It's so juicy. It's like literally my favorite month so far and i feel like every month. We talk about just amazing topics around self-discovery and mindset and so to end the year as we're recording this in this this topic of feminity is so beautiful because there's all different ways of looking at it. i mean the reality is. Is that this. Concept of femininity. In and of itself is deep. There's a lot of different ways. You could approach it and so on the pike cast. We're looking at that. we're looking at. How do you personally define your own femininity because we're getting all these messages from diet culture from the fashion industry from the porn industry. On what it is to be a woman you have to look certain way you have to behave a certain way. Even on google like the definition of femininity is like agreeable and pleasing and cooperative and quiet. It's just as outdated one dimensional definition of what it is to be a woman so on the show. We're getting to explore like okay. If i could look at the totality of myself as a woman the essence of what makes me divinely female. What does that even look like. How do i even begin to experience her. And not just from what. I've been told from childhood or religion or culturally. You know i know that Especially now as even tricky because we are more out there than ever as women and working were raising children. We are in unconventional relationships. We are in a way trying to do it all. And it's exhausting us. I mean it's really depleting acids burning us out and so it still trying to figure out. How do i define this in a new way. That isn't like in the confines masculinity like. I don't have to work like a man. I don't have to produce like a manner achieve like a man was. It looked like to do that as a woman. So those are kind of the the surface level things that we're talking about on the show and then we're getting into all the fund woohoo staff about your menstrual cycle and the moon cycle and astrology. An archetype. so it's like real a wide range of different lenses in looking at feminine entity. that's fantastic. Yeah i will put a link in the show notes to that specific episode. And it's it's one of the episodes that i tuned into law. You guys are talking some very fascinating stuff that you mentioned how inner in our culture were to a point now where women are trying to do so much and where so many different hats that they're beginning to experience are have already experienced burn. How do you help someone recover from this and really kind of start embracing taking care of themselves. You know i think. I just xfl because like it really is something that is so prevalent right now that just depletion that deprivation an of self care and taking care of the needs that we have and it's bread. Ns almost taught to us from a very early age to give and give and give and give and be yes women to be people pleasers to do it all then you mix that in with like okay now. I'm feeling liberated. And i'm feeling independent in so i want to achieve all of these things and be the best version of myself and the reality is is that no human male or female can keep up with that kind of twenty four seven all in kind of demand for their lives and so to me when we can begin to look at first of all where my feeling deprived like i think we kind of have to almost diagnose the situation i and figure out where we're feeling exhausted. What's exhausted in our lives and get really honest. First and foremost about what's draining ass. What siphoning off our energy because no amount of self care can sort of cover up win we keep in the same patterns that are going to deplete us like that piece has to shift in order to experience something different and so i is identifying where am i at you know from a scale of one to ten on the burn out scale. Where am i am. I am handling it in my functioning. M i barely functioning am i to the point where i feel like i could have a mental breakdown and blow up at any moment which i feel like a lot of us are at that place you know. It's like the covid fatigue. The twenty twenty fatigue is really setting in and our bandwidth is is not what it normally would be and so i think the first step is going okay. I'm i'm really exhausted here. I'm struggling and from that place. Then we can look what needs to shift and starting to identify those warning signs that come into play that are ever so gently to the point. Where it's that little twinge of this is to match and say yes. And then oop i'm over committed and we say more and the point. Eventually we're most of us get total. Burnout is where it's like. Our body is shutting down our adrenals or shot are cortisol levels are depleted our vitamin d is depleted like everything within our physical bodies emotionally and just from a health. Standpoint is gone like the reserve has gone. So that's kind of like the the level ten on that scale. So let's look at where we at been. We can think about recovery replenishment and rejuvenation from a very holistic point of view.

Shirley Depression Mary Google
Laughter Is The Best Medicine

Zen Parenting Radio

03:21 min | Last week

Laughter Is The Best Medicine

"So entity parenti. Moment i want to focus on was called laughter and i'm going to read it. Comedian steve. martin reportedly reportedly lasts for five minutes in front of his mirror every morning. Explaining his goal is to jump start. His creativity begin the day on a high note. So just picture that. I care but you but i just wonder how often what does that urban legend and if that's really was from his memoir a believe it but there's gotta be it's that's a lot to ask five minutes of well. Do you think he d he could do it. I mean people meditate for ten minutes a day. I'm sure he can laugh for five minutes. And i think it's all relative right like even people who say they meditate everyday miss days. I think his point is sometimes gotta get yourself worked up to the place where you like. I've been bright. You know you know. I write every morning and lately. I've just been saying Good morning how are you talking to myself. Will i keep doing that. I don't know. But what i'm trying to do is engage myself. Tim totally engaged my thinking so he may do something else to make himself last. You go on to say children. We left hundreds of times a day but as adults we take life so seriously that laughter becomes infrequent it is in our best interest to seek out opportunities for good humor us better inside and out. Laughter is one of the best things we can do to strengthen our immune system decrease pain and keep our mind out of worry mode. Nothing works faster or more dependable to bring us back into balance then laughing enclosing. It's more than just a break from sadness and pain. It's actually a path back to hope. A humorous perspective creates a psychological distance. That can make situations feel less. Threatening and more manageable. Laughter is medicine offsetting the physical and psychological impact of stress and increasing our ability to feel joy. Yes there's the moment. Yeah so. I think the reason you played the Indigo girls was because i used that quote from that song. Exactly right yeah well. It's only life after off. And just because i've played this clip a million times. I'm gonna play two million in one. This is the this is audio of the infant baby laughing at his dog or her dog eating popcorn. I think that would be more productive than in the mere. Like if i feel like that should be in my to do list. Every morning is look at this baby laughing. Yeah yeah that's a way to start the day right. They're not cnn or fox or msnbc. That's the way to start the yes. Yeah i agree. I mean and i think that it It comes from that baby that comes from the gut. That's a good laugh. It's very like solely focused on what's funny in you like. As adults we start to like lose our good laugh laugh becomes more like. Yeah but i got focused here like we are. We don't really like focus in on the thing. That's funny and i think memories are often created around really deep hard laughs like we have stories where we were laughing so hard that we like either felt sick or like we're doubled over and that creates a memory. You know what i mean. I do

Parenti Martin Steve TIM Msnbc CNN FOX
One whole year of coronavirus in Australia. How did we do?

Coronacast

02:07 min | 1 d ago

One whole year of coronavirus in Australia. How did we do?

"The twenty fifth january norman. It's really weird. Having done this podcast for so long now that we're coming around to anniversaries of the coronavirus which seemed like it only happened a meaning to go and then at the same time an absolute lifetime ago the twenty fifth of january twenty twenty was the day that australia announced its first official case of coronavirus within the country. Yes it was. A man from wuhan had flew into melbourne from guandong. I think he flew in on the nineteenth of january and the reports the case on the twenty fifth of january two australia's credit we had testing already available at that point. Didn't awful lot about brendan murphy. The chief medical officer when when announcing it had the broad idea of what the virus was was doing that condition period. some people got mild symptoms. Then you by the pattern from china. But they didn't know as much as we know but they had it. There was no quarantine at that point for people coming in. There were just watched. And if people were keep themselves goes first cases. People behaved extremely well and kept himself so themselves without a formal process in place but It in retrospect it was landmark and a landmark very much different from other places if you think of the united states where there was a case the landed in seattle seattle near seattle in washington state. And they didn't have proper testing available the tests that they had available was was faulty. There were very strict rules for how it could be used and six weeks later. They really had a serious outbreak in washington state. We we were pretty good about getting onto it. Yeah the flip side of that first ralliers. This man was the first official case. He but he didn't pass it on to anyone else. That the strain dodd when he recovered and we didn't actually have human-to-human transmission on australian soil for about six weeks but we did have importation of cases So that we we were pretty lucky at that point and it just goes to show that eighty percent of people that we know who have covered. Do not pass onto other people. It's a twenty percent to start a cluster. it's funny thinking about the different moments.

Guandong Brendan Murphy Australia Wuhan Seattle Norman Melbourne Washington China United States
Should we re-think who gets the vaccine first?

Coronacast

04:51 min | 4 d ago

Should we re-think who gets the vaccine first?

"So the vaccines are coming as we keep saying and we keep hearing but one of the big discussion points. This week is who should get it first. So we've talked about this before we've talked about high risk groups like elderly people. 'cause they're at high risk of severe disease being at the front of the queue and healthcare workers because they have a high likelihood of both catching it and also spreading it. The obvious ones but there's been arguments that teachers should be given priority treatment and supermarket workers because they are frontline workers. And maybe we should also consider giving it to people who work in quarantine hotels transport because they've been spread as in the past when we have a limited supply of the vaccine. Straight up. norman. Who should be at the front of that queue. It's hard to argue with the priorities. The federal government's put out and in fact hotel quarantine workers boorda workers people dealing with people come from overseas drivers. They are actually at the front of the queue and they need to be because they are our first line of defense and they're also the most vulnerable so they need to be protected and if the vaccines dupe prevent transmission they will also be a ring of defense so that they will kind of if they do get infected they will resist infection not spread it into the community so they are very much early recipients of the vaccine the vaccine healthcare workers are hard to argue with particularly in aged care as our feel elderly care because they are extremely vulnerable to serious illness. So again it's hard to argue with that you've really gotta go for care and protection and saving lives and saving severe disease as your first priority and also if possible preventing transmission the community and remember h. Care has been a transmission point as well once it gets into each care. And they've been focused of clusters so then. The debate is a perfectly reasonable one who dealing with say young kids teachers and others of the front lines such as supermarket workers. You can argue that too on the basis of protection now. There is another argument here. Once you've covered the people who are most vulnerable whether in fact by then you'll know more about reduce transmission and whether you should switch tack because in fact if you really wanna reduce transmission in the community you need to immunize people who are at most risk of infection and those are not the elderly. The people who are at risk of infection are the younger people in the community because they know my bow their more mobile how they're out there the socially mixing and so you'd head off for people aged over eighteen and under sixty five and they might become your higher priority because if they are protected from infection they will van protect the people and that's true hair immunity. And then you away at that so that would require a bit of a radical change in approach and an assumption that you're reducing transmission but it should be more information coming in from the towns of moves. People who've been immunized overseas is already some evidence from israel reduce transmission but again in israel. The haven't yet moved into those age groups so you can't really tell but by the time we get there we might be in a position to say let's pivot and will actually go really go hell for leather for young people so we know that in australia with getting two different types of vaccine mckenna smallest supply of the fayza shot and then a lot of the oxford astrazeneca shot which has been a source of debate in australia. Because there's different efficacy between those two vaccines. And we've actually had a question about that from one about isreaeli karenna costa's gary who lives on a kibbutz and gary makes the point in agriculture. When we give treatment against pests or does as a good farmer does not repeat the same treatment twice in the same season. You should use different products different methods to attack the same disease or pest and he's wondering whether the same would bear out with a vaccine. Well if we move away from the mango and avocado plantations on an israeli boots towards vaccines. The reality with a vaccine. Is that almost all if not all at this. Stage have been designed based on the wuhan version of the corona virus from almost a year ago. So it's a good question but the reality is that changing vaccines not going to change the target. The target is despite protein from wuhan virus. It may be as time goes on and particularly with the worry about the south african variant of the virus that you might be getting code anti escape or antibody escape and you might need to redesign the vaccine with a new spike protein. In which case. Probably the fis are and moderna. Vaccines are going to be more flexible to do that. And they say we can do that within six weeks so it's not much it's not so much by varying the vaccine technology because the vaccines are all targeting. The same part of the virus

Severe Disease Boorda Norman Federal Government Isreaeli Karenna Costa Israel Gary Australia Mckenna Wuhan FIS
Dr. Ginger Campbell

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:10 min | 4 d ago

Dr. Ginger Campbell

"I appreciate you all being here. We appreciate of course supporting the people that support the program and keep the wind in excel's of the corolla pirate ship. Don't get after dark and find a doctor dot com to the streaming show. We're doing every day. Usually around three o'clock you can get that dr dot com and of course those youthful this appreciate it. I guess somebody. I'm very excited about to start ginger campbell. She has the what am. I very very very favorite podcasts. So you see me. Dull myself on this podcast with my favorite podcasters. Podcast is brain science with ginger campbell. Book is are you. Sure the unconscious origins of certainty Let's see hit number one in neuroscience amazon in june. Her website is virginia campbell. C. a. m. p. b. e. l. l. virginia campbell. Md dot com podcast website is brain science podcast dot com and the twitter handles at dock. Artemisia art mis and there's much more to say Ginger was a emergency medicine. Doctor and then retrained in palliative care but Have so much more. I want to talk to you about that. I appreciate you being here. Now thanks for having me. And i didn't realize you're a palliative specialist that immediately wanted. I sort of made me think. I wanted to talk about the topic in addition to the neuroscience Stuff that you've been engaged in in your podcast which i am deeply interested in. It was something neuro science was in its absolute infancy was in when i was in college. But i got very very attached to it and so does my basic biochemistry and neuroscience my longest trainings and all the way through Through medical school and residency. I maintained an interest in it and then they ended up working in a psychiatric hospital for thirty years. So i saw a lot of the stuff writ large and kept up on the neuroscience and how that has changed over that time which it has changed a bit But just before indulge me for a second because i really feel like in the in the aftermath or in the midst of this covert thing. One of the things i keep saying is we've got to start talking about end of life. I mean we are just not preparing people. I get public and i go. Hey everybody i say this to my family. I don't ever want to be in a nursing home a don't ever put if i am so neurologically impaired. I'm so physically debilitated that i need institutional care. Get me a palliative specialist. I'm staying home. Let's let this ride an and the extreme attention to extending life in the nursing facility is sort of. I don't know if the people that are in there one that right right. What do you make all this. Well you know my focus. Right now is on situation in the hospital because i work at the va. It's in fact. I got my first pfizer vaccine today. Congressional i'm so jealous i am so. Oh yeah yeah but so anyhow that that's that's a have to admit it was a little scary. I mean i'm a. I'm a big fan of vaccines but you know And i think the science behind this one is really good. I agree But anyhow and by the way it's different for you. And i were sort of peer age a little bit. And if i'm not having rushing my kids out for you know what i mean but for and i it makes sense it makes perfect sense absolutely so anyhow My concern is you know we have an increasing number of patients with covid at a be a hospital. But i work at and we don't have these conversations with people we are not talking to people. When they're first hospitalize well they're able to make decisions or think about things right and then they end up on a ventilator and they still don't talk to anybody about it system problem when there were they are ready to help and we're not being. We're not being called and i just i find that really upset ginger. I was a resident. And i did a lot of intensive care medicine. For the first ten years of my life and practice. He was considered cruel but an eight year old on a ventilator it was considered bizarre because the best you could do was six to twelve months of misery following that it was just. They got that sick. That's they got sick. That's the way it goes. Do the best you can right. And you remember before. The supreme court cases that allowed people to be extirpated. You didn't want to end debate one of those people because you knew that it meant they were going to be stuck there for the rest of their life ricky austin amis and misery and skin breakdown and horrors and we didn't have pal medicine yet but we seem to have lost track of all this now. We're all focused on putting eight-year-olds ventilators. I can't believe it. Yeah yeah it's it's. I just wish we you know it's a weird disease. You get to usually be sick for a week before you get really sick. Which means that. There's time we should be having this conversation with every person that's diagnosed and we're aubrey completely agree with you well. I'm sorry that's the case that that to me. That's i think some hospitals are doing better. But i just know where i am. It's not a half of one of the oldest palliative care programs in the system. I'm certain you have an ethics committee. Please refer to ethics committee because this is a massive ethical problem really. Is i many times. Come into stuff like this. I got to refer to the ethics committee. And i don't and i feel bad that i didn't to this day some of the stuff i've seen interns extreme interventions at end of life. That are just just horrible. Yeah well i'm with you. That's why when pal of care. I actually do have a video on youtube For anyone who cares on. I talked to the american humanist association about pal of care Dasa it's been six y- five or six years ago now And it's on youtube. And and what i said was you know. Death is really not the enemy. It's suffering it's the enemy that's right mean everyone's gonna wind and i would argue a also in addition to suffering would be undignified Dying i i think. Death death with dignity is a very important thing And yeah and and what happened to me. When i was giving that talk it was in denver. I got totally blindsided at the end by the right to people you know. I should've seen him coming. But i i didn't. And and so. I was like saliba surprised by the questions. I got because as a pal of care specialist. I kind of feel like if you're if you're patient wants you to end their life. You're doing something wrong because as a pallet specialist. My job is to make people's end of life as good as possible right right and most people when they say they want to die prematurely. It's because they're afraid of suffering or they're afraid of losing control they are ago are suffering and they are and but they think that we can usually make people not suffer. Yup i really do the right things. That's that's that's the whole goal of palette of medicine is is is to prevent suffering so I that's why i consider it good old fashioned medicine. I agree i agree. Listen us are. My dad was a family. Practitioner had him ringing in my head during this epidemic like. I just hear him going the flu. The flu eight-year-olds. I'm thin layers with what we had. Polio there's kids dying by the thousands. What the flu. what are you doing. Just die second time. It would die a second death that happened. But let's let's get off that. Because i really wanna get into the neuroscience stuff i love your podcast and i actually like i think i like best your recaps the ones that you do where you review stuff review books review whom you've spoken to. I don't know where to start. Let's start with how you got interested. Or what your intention is with looking at neuroscience number one and

Ginger Campbell Virginia Campbell Ricky Austin Ginger Amazon Pfizer Twitter VA Aubrey American Humanist Association Youtube Supreme Court Ethics Committee Saliba FLU Denver Polio
Stigma of Borderline Personality Disorder

The Psych Central Show

10:07 min | 4 d ago

Stigma of Borderline Personality Disorder

"I'm your host gave howard and call it into the show today. We have psychiatrist. Dr james seymour. Who joined sierra tucson in two thousand ten dr seymour received his medical degree from the university of tennessee and completed his psychiatric residency at the university of virginia. Dr seymour welcome to the show. Thank you for having me appreciate it dr seymour. In a previous episode we learned all about the inner workings of borderline personality disorder. How it is diagnosed symptoms to watch for and why it is so difficult to treat now. I was surprised by our listener. Email asking me why. I ignored the controversy people. Let me know that border. Line is in their words. The most stigmatized mental illness there is. Do you think that is true. I would agree with that. Except also those people with chronic psychotic disorders like schizophrenia. They're often very discriminated against. But for a non psychotic disorder. I think the people with borderline personality disorder diagnoses by far the most discriminated against. Why do you think that is. I know that people with mental illness in general as as somebody who lives with bipolar disorder. Believe me. i've seen the stigma and discrimination firsthand. But i was surprised that so many people with borderline personality felt that there was just an extra oath. Why is that well. I had to understand what a personality disorder. According to our current diagnostic classification is all about what we have is. What i call categorical personality disorders. That we're looking at pervasive patterns of behavior that continues throughout adult life with some precursors in childhood or adolescence. The problem with those is that they are basically categories and our personalities are much much more complicated than any personality that we would give a name to. So i am not in favor of the current way of diagnosing personality disorders or chronic patterns of behavior that are maladaptive. Now the borderline personality disorder is particularly difficult because the people who are diagnosed with that they have unstable relationships who relationship with the treatment providers are often unstable as well although there are adequate tweeden's for that now they have been previously seen as tweeting. They've been discriminated against because often their behavior self harm behavior suicide attempts repeatedly other impulsive self destructive behavior create a lot of problems for the therapy providers and so they just developed negative feelings towards people with that disorder and so does the general population. One of the things that i learned is that people with borderline personality disorder. They tend to seek out drama. That's my layman's term. Way of putting it. But i can see why somebody who doesn't understand. Mental health issues and mental illness might see somebody who is involved in a lot of dramatic relationships or or constantly fighting arguing. Why people might move away from people like that for their own mental health but when one of the symptoms of personality disorder is seeking out these unstable dramatic relationships and ten to move away from you. How do you bridge that gap again. I know that i would not be doing as well as i'm doing. Without the love and support of my friends and family but if my friends and family had moved away from me that would have made my illness harder to treat now as psychiatrist. How how do you get everybody on the same page when well when. That's the symptom. The first thing i do is to reframe. What is actually going on weather than use the term or personality disorder. I talked about what it really is about. It's about a human being who has very maladaptive coping mechanisms to deal with they. Highly dissuade related Nervous system which is often secondary to trauma and or genetic factors so the emphasis on. There's nothing wrong with the person they're adaptive capacities and the doctor means have not served them well in adulthood enter creating a problem with them and in their relationships. And once you do that. You take all the stigma away. Don't permit any staff members here to refer to people as having borderline personality disorder basically. It's a normal human beings who has maladaptive coping mechanisms. Once you do that. The stigma is gone in my mind. Now the base problem is we have the problem of having tribal brains. We developed a thousands and thousands and thousands of years in small tribes of one hundred fifty to four hundred people Competing for resources have not changed although society has changed so when we're in a tribal ancient civilization everybody else outside our try. Were considering not people and so we can do whatever we wanted to justify in disrespecting them making them enslaved killing them wiping them out whatever now we still have that same way of dealing with what we would call an utter so anytime we made when we will disrespect them and we will mistreat them. Even though we don't want to give a couple of examples of that. let's look. I am a white person of color. I am male you female. I am straight you are gay. I in german. You are jude. I am staff your patient. I am normal. You'll borderline anytime we do that. We will disrespect in create problems for that other person. That's one of the things you really have the to use to fight the stigma and help the patient understand that although they have very significant symptoms and although they have very difficult interpersonal relationships at the core is willing nothing wrong with them. Because they feel that. There's something terribly wrong with them that they are flawed in major ways or they're bad or untreatable and so the focus is on no there. Is nothing really wrong with you. Accept behaviors to which has become maladaptive. And we only need to do is help you to change those behaviors. Obviously we know that. There's a lot of stigma surrounding mental illnesses. And as we're talking about there's even more for borderline personality disorder. Do you think one of the reasons that there's more stigma is because there's no medication option for patients with this diagnosis. So that makes people think that. Maybe it's i hate to use the word fake but because there's no definitive testing for mental illness. Everybody looks at it sideways. But i i think that if you're taking medication for something people are like a doctor prescribed medication so it must be maybe real start to turn the corner a little bit but then when we get to borderline personality disorder. It's only therapy if it's only therapy than maybe it's a and even personality disorder right in the title it. Does this contribute. I think it contributes some in terms of the medication. I think the great deal of stigma is because these patients are some of the hardest to deal with if they're hard to deal with therapist and doctors. They're very difficult to deal with their and loved ones because of the instability of the relationships. The tennessee towards angered the difficulty with emotional regulation. So they're seen as a behavioral problem rather than somebody that has treatable and difficulties and actually it's not a disorder or illness per se because the personality disorder diagnosis or not felt to be illnesses but pervasive patterns of being in the world and relating to other people and themselves. So it's not really a mental illness. It is again Maladaptive coping mechanisms to deal with the dissuaded nervous system. And just once you get to that point then. You get rid of all the stigma now. Medications are used very frequently. But they're used to tweet some of the major symptoms so somebody may be on mood stabiliser for regulation and moved. Somebody may be an antidepressant for recurrent depression and suicidal aviation and suicide attempts. So we do use medication. But not for the diagnosis. We use medications for the symptoms. That are for some for the individual to manage. Even when they're in they're happy one of the things that you've made reference to is that the providers find them difficult to work with are the providers accidentally creating more stigma by making that known. I am sure that is the case. I'm sure it splits from the hospitals treatment centers psychiatric to the general population. I'm sure that it has something to do with it. And do you think that that name contributes to some of the the stigma and discrimination against patients. Who have this diagnosis. I think we should stop using the term altogether. I think using the term. It's been in use for so long. We're never going to change people's you never going to change their business doctors view of what we're dealing with will always gonna make them and other and we will always mistreat them and when working with these patients who have been diagnosed with that they pick up subtle signs of disrespect very easily because they've been generally severely traumatized and experienced a great deal abuse in their lives and so by just not thinking of that disorder. What happened is when we work together. Some of those negative maladaptive behaviors go away. Because we're just treating each other one person to one person so. I don't think anything's going to happen till we get that diagnosis. It's a label. And what would you call the diagnosis instead. We've got a call it something the thing you really look at it. It's a disorder of two aspects. It's trauma related and many cases and also attachment related if people used words like Trauma related problems or trauma related developmental problems or trauma and attachment developmental issues. Something like that. Takes a lot of stigma way. We'll

Dr Seymour Dr James Seymour Sierra Tucson Chronic Psychotic Disorders University Of Tennessee University Of Virginia Schizophrenia Bipolar Disorder Howard Tennessee Depression Trauma
The Ideal Nutrition And How To Use Supplements

20 Minute Fitness

04:57 min | 4 d ago

The Ideal Nutrition And How To Use Supplements

"Hi chris welcome to twenty minutes it s. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah can you start off by telling us a little bit more about your background. And what aesthetic. Greens is about sure muslims. Chris i'm originally from new zealand. Which left me with the monica north. America of chris deke end. I am the proud founder and ceo of a company called athletic greens. This company was originally formed out of a search for a solution to my own problem. Which was that. I wasn't absorbing neutrons properly. And i ended up basically going on a journey to sort of addressing health problems that led to a clinic in phoenix spending a ton of money doing every blood stool saliva test. You can possibly imagine to have a group very smart people. Tell me that look You just don't appear to be absorbing nutrients properly which was a shock to me. Because up until that time. I thought i'd been doing pretty much everything right as it related to. How approach health nutrition and how it approach supplementation and sort of led me to the drawing board to think through an rethink through everything. I thought i knew about nutrition and health and everything else so long story short. I'm customer number. One of what has become a very popular way of removing the fiction from covering nutritional basis every day without cornerstone product grains which. I'm excited to be a part of and we've of lawrence two thousand nine two thousand ten. The proper film launch early two thousand eleven and since then have gone through fifty directions to continually. Look at how can we deliver what. Wait what we consider to be. Sort of that premium. Bist centralist approach to cover nutritional basis every day. Love it so. Tell me more about why. Your body couldn't absorb nutrients well enough. We'll so i have a background. In health and exercise. I studied sport science degree at open university. Which i dropped out of with two classes to go to stop my first business. I'm an entrepreneur through through and have just kicked this lifelong passion around health and fitness. And i was falling. What's considered the nineteen ten approach which was basically. Look if you do everything right. Non-extendible time the other ten percent meta too much and i'd had a few significant number of sort of respiratory tract fictions over the years and the committed to grow infrequency took that i was taking antibiotics for something three to four times a week. And i think. I had a couple of different Forces all collide at once. But at the end of the day i had very few good. Bacteria had a really torn up gi system. And i was eating very significant levels of both protein in a variety of vegetables and supplementing. With what i thought at the time was a great multivitamin and i ended up finding that i was in the eighth to twelfth percentile on a lot of the central bottoms as minerals and even mino- essence. And so when these guys came back from that testing and said hey digital's none of them. Why this right. We have some of these minerals in the twelfth percentile I was really shocked. And just turn out have all sorts of problems traditionally with the gut and the solution from these guys was to say. Look west put you on a basic limitation diet and they gave me at the time one hundred dollars a day customized my blood bike in st nutrition regime. And like i said. I saw two vessels taking fifty horse stalls a day and i just realized it must be a better way so this way back then led me on this journey to seek out experts on. I never claimed to be the sort of exit decide. Look at what good nutrition really was and start to understand things like what got health what is by ability y generally do you wanna get nutrition nutrients as much as possible from food. What food quality is some of these other dynamics at the lead me on a journey that led to us creding athletic rim. Yeah i mean you believe that you can achieve your best self. without nurturing. Your body with writing attrition right so in your opinion then after you've talked to all those experts what the right nutrition look like for me. I think for every human. There's a couple of different pieces. And i think we all want to cover off most basic nutrient basis an never put out any Around sort of supplementation being anything other than a path towards optimization i think food is i and you should always focus on food but in terms of what is great nutrition. My general framework is pretty simple. I think you want to eat to maintain your blood sugar levels and a healthy range. I think you want to eat a diet that for you does not lead to any sort of dynamic where you're very inflammatory environment. And i think you want to eat a sort of respite of metros in total calories that match your lifestyle and where that in line you wanna make sure. You're focused on food quality. Health quality pieces Seems to be of looked so often. And his principal or nutrient density and then the other variables around william micronutrients are coming from and the quality of and sort of how much cobb some extra protein. How much fat. That's a lot of those are gonna come down to individual preference potentially and then also just how do you live your life that attrition demands of someone who's on a bike aggressively training for two to france. They're going to be very different from someone. Likes to go for walks every day. And maybe it's the german two or three days a week for

Chris Deke Open University New Zealand Phoenix Chris Lawrence America Cobb France
Mastering The Microbiome

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:08 min | 4 d ago

Mastering The Microbiome

"The major source of all inflammation in the is actually guy so your host the largest number of immune cells in the body. So that you're all cells in your body or found in your guy got them in your spleen your thymus. You're obviously in your blood. So in addition to immune cells being your got you also have a lot of bacteria in your gut and those bacteria play a very very important role in regulating your immune system. So you're talking about people that are eating unhealthy. They're not getting enough fiber and you know they're doing damage in the guy and that's causing a lot of immune cells to become active chronically. Every day you know you have to feed those bacteria the right types of foods you can kind of think of them as little chemical producing factories actually because when feed them the right type of food which happens to be fiber fiber gets digested by bacteria in your gut in your colon specifically and it produces a bunch of different chemical products called short chain fatty acids which are little signaling molecules. That tell your immune cells in your guy to become a certain type of immune cell. So they'll tell okay.

The huge coronavirus challenge facing America's new President

Coronacast

06:00 min | 5 d ago

The huge coronavirus challenge facing America's new President

"Health reported. Teigen tayla journalist alter norman swan. It's thursday the twenty first of january. That's right and early this morning at least australian time joe biden has been sworn into office the new president and before he took office he was really clear that he wanted to be very tough on coronavirus but the scale of the pandemic in that states is just massive. Yesterday they passed a mall. Start four hundred thousand deaths. The pace of the spread really isn't slowing down. Is it actually possible to for joe biden to get the pandemic under control and if so what is it going to take well as going to take a lot and we just should not in passing. Yesterday's really moving ceremony at the mall commemorating the deaths or honoring the deaths of of the more than four hundred thousand people who've died of covid nineteen now and you'd have to say that's a number that's been largely preventable To a very significant stint of america had got its act together early on and just a very brief run through of the disaster that unfolded in the united states where they knew it was coming. Were in contact with the chinese. It didn't have a test that worked. The cdc was insisting that people use their tests. The food and drug administration was being very slow in approving new tests. People in washington state public health officials in washington state. Were tearing their hair out because they knew it was spreading in washington state and they had no national coordination of testing over testing infrastructure and just spread and spread and spread under the radar. People didn't know how much there was around and there were unreasonable restrictions on who could be tested so all on top of fragmented system with no leadership president trump constantly trying to minimize the problem and avoid it and undermined the people who were advising him and they jettisoned at the beginning of the trump administration. The jettison the obama pandemic plan win the game plan to pandemic in two thousand and nineteen year or so before the pandemic they found that it was wanting they didn't they. Were not ready for it. And the national stock pow was depleted. You can't imagine a bigger cluster of problems than they had in the united states. So what can biden do so. The first thing he's intending do is amp up vaccination rates considerably by creating you infrastructure for vaccination around the country remember. There's no infrastructure of general practice of coordinated healthcare systems in the united states. So you've got to set something up in parallel. So he's devoted a lot of money to that because apparently of the thirty million doses that have been distributed in the united states. Only a fraction have actually been administered extrordinary situation again with very restricted rules about who can be immunized not an does it does reports of doses going to waste so even dozes. They're supposed to being given have not been given an actually have been thrown in the bucket. The other thing that he's going to do is create a national testing infrastructure. Sin factory coordinator testing nationwide. Don't believe it or not having have have at the moment and then there's mass mandatory mask wearing in federal property which is really the only power i think that the president has and to encourage mask-wearing around the country. But reality is that only a severe and very long lockdown we'll get this under control while the pandemic spreads and it will spread for a long time while they are immunizing. It's going to be a long time before this is coming. This comes under control. So essentially the biden administration is doing nothing. Fancy is doing stuff that's just basic controlling pandemic starting on the back foot really like in some ways the trump administration they were the ones that have allowed the vaccine to get up in such a short amount of time but so many of the other parts of the public health response there have have put them in a disadvantage. Now yes you can see that and we confronting this as well in australia. not just enough to have the technology the vaccine you've got to have the means of distributing it so let's stick with ex saints because one of the questions that we have been getting a lot from audience over the past few weeks. Is that now that we're seeing vaccinations. Millions of vaccines being distributed globally. When are we going to say cases. Drop because of vaccination where you're only going to see cases draw when they move beyond the high priority groups such as health care workers people in each care and the elderly and infirm. So that will have an impact on. Death's you'll start to see deaths tailing off but cases will only start to decline. When you get the people who are actually being infected at an enlarge proportions being immunized so once you get down the age groups to below sixty five to people who are otherwise healthy when you start immunizing those groups in large numbers. They're the people who are actually catching the infection and spreading it and so once they get immunized assuming vaccines control transmission. That's when you start to see view. The case rates declining it may be much slower and countries which are relying on the astra vaccine. If the if we're not getting our performance rates have. Their backs astra vaccine. We're not going to see transmission declining very fast in astra countries. Unless as i said before. I'm repeating myself. But unless we get high performances out of the astro vaccine through does each changes in places where the pfizer madonna vaccines in. We should see that a little bit later. In the year as people in the younger age groups could immunized so. Is it kind of a question of a few months from now or is it as little as wakes well in israel. It's already starting to move into those groups. And in fact in israel and some other countries when they got to the end of the day and vaccine nation centers and they had doses to spare they would text people in those younger groups to come in for immunize ation so no doses were wasted.

Teigen Tayla Norman Swan Joe Biden America Washington Biden Administration Food And Drug Administration CDC Biden Barack Obama Astra Saints Australia Israel
Bonus Content: Schizoaffective Disorder vs Schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:18 min | 5 d ago

Bonus Content: Schizoaffective Disorder vs Schizophrenia

"To be exploring the differences between schizo affective disorder and schizophrenia gave. It seems simple at first and then it got really complicated. I feel like that's like all of our episodes like when i first look at the topic. I'm like oh this'll be easy. And then when. I like really research and get into what happened. This is confusing. I think there were definitely explaining. Why mental illness is so difficult to understand. People think depression and sadness or the same thing right like so. Let's move that aside. It's like schizo affective in schizophrenia. They both have schizophrenia. So therefore they must be the same thing but Yeah that's completely false. We're going to be exploring all of that and we also have the wonderful doctor. Michelle moss for her mind. Path care centers. Who be joining us to give us the doctor's perspective on all of this and she is wonderful show coming up a little later in the show the very basic definition of schizo affective disorder. Is it schizophrenia. With an added mood disorder similar to bipolar. The prefix skitso refers to psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. That affect a person's thinking since of self perceptions and in the term effective refers to extremes shift in mood energy and behavior so right away. i'll tell you. I'm already confused. Because i feel like schizophrenia. Itself is just extreme shifts and everything will right but as we learned from the. What is schizophrenia. Episode it's not so much those extreme shifts which are what people see but it's the adding of features and the removing of features. And that's how you get a schizophrenia diagnosis. So some of this is really just narrowing down at the diagnosis. Which of course allows doctors to narrow down treatment opportunities and that's really important and all of this falls under the heading of mental illness. And under that you also have different mood disorders and psychotic disorders so a mood disorder. That's usually involving intense and sustained sadness. Melancholy despair that'd be known as major depression milder but still prolonged. Depression can be diagnosed as disdain. Mia bipolar disorder is a mood disorder also formerly known as manic depression and that involves a really high or pressured mood states mania alternating with normal or depressed. Moods now schizophrenia is classified as a psychotic disorder. So the psychotic disorders are the patterns belief language perceptions of reality that become distorted. So we're talking about your hallucinations. Delusions in kind of delusional type disorders. Now you. I'm not meaning to call you out here but you do have bipolar. I do yeah. You are the expert so that's classified as a mood disorder sa- q. Explain to us what bipolar is to you. And how does it affect your life. This of course is the interesting part of mental illness. It's not one size. Fits all the symptoms that impact me the most may not be the symptoms that impact. Somebody else the most so. That's the first thing that i want. Stay right up front now for me. Depression and mania and a scotia psychosis is really white. Gets me the most especially the mania the grandiose thinking and then thinking that people are are watching me. I i have delusions. Other people with bipolar disorder may not have as much mania or the mania may be easier for them to control but it's the depression that gets them and even as i'm saying this. I think that the time that i had that really bad. Depression spell was was extraordinarily difficult. Maybe i shouldn't just gloss over that so quickly because i've had an make. An air quotes more mania. How would you describe a manic episode or that mania that you experience. Take us through the best way that i can describe. Mania is a consequence free environment. Whatever is happening in the moment is the only thing that you care about and you see this and things like where people spend all of their money that they need for their rent and you think well how could you do that. You're renting do in a week. Well yeah but that's not in the moment that's not right now right now. I have five hundred dollars. I'm gonna spend it right now because rented not do right now. Having the ability to think toward the future is something that mania easily strips away from the person the next thing is it creates this filter where you see whatever you want to see for example. Let's say that. I do something wrong. And a whole crowd of people are yelling and booing at me. The mania filter. It shows me. Those people cheering. It shows them happy and paying attention to me. I get what i want. So therefore my behavior will escalate all their cheering. They're happy they're excited. Those are really just huge hallmarks. Obviously the inability to focus. You really. don't get anything done your thinking. That's always extraordinarily positive. Even though there's absolutely no data to show that anything positive is happening. And how would you describe your depressive episodes with bipolar. Depression works very much the same as major depression stand alone for lack of a better way to describe it. It's a pit darkness it's hopelessness. It's no path forward it's heavy. It just feels mt and whatever is happening in that exact moment is how it's going to be forever and what's happening. Is that exact moment. Is that your brain is like you are worthless. Your mother doesn't love you. your co host. Rachel hates working with you. Don't bother getting up. you're stupid and all that is just sort of repeating over and over again. It just kills any motivation or desire that you have to move forward in a positive way which of course becomes this deep dark. Hopeless pit of despair so schizophrenia plus components bipolar that schizo affective disorder. That's the easiest way to break down. Her originally schizo affective was considered to be a subtype of schizophrenia. Back when they had different subtypes it was kind of kind of thrown under there. Maybe that it was considered a separate psychotic disorder and they were like you know what. It's not schizophrenia. But we're not really sure what it is. It's something though. And the imf five. So that's the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. And that is one of the major diagnostic used in the world but mainly used in america also and it categorized schizo affective under the category of schizophrenia spectrum and comic disorders it's listed in the spectrum and it has two different types. You have bipolar type. Which includes mania and sometimes major depression and then you have a depressive type so that means you only have the depressive episodes which is interesting to me that they split that up that you have the bipolar side and then you also have just that oppressive side of it even just trying to say. What does the association classified as. It gets confusing so quickly. It's like no. They're not even sure either. It's been bounced around. It's very important to point out that in a way that's good right. Yes there's no authoritative decisions. What it is. This is what it will always be. Research is ongoing that being said it does present patients like rachel and i with sort of a scary proposition. Is this the best path forward for us and the answer is for today. Yes but always keep working with your doctor. Keep on top of the latest research. Find out what's going on and it. New treatments are becoming available all the time.

Schizophrenia Schizo Affective Disorder Depression Michelle Moss Psychosis Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Mania Rachel IMF America
5 Unconventional Tips to Spend Less Time on Your Phone and Get Focused - 641

The Chalene Show

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

5 Unconventional Tips to Spend Less Time on Your Phone and Get Focused - 641

"What is up buttercup. Thank you so much for joining me here on the lean show. My name is leeann johnson. I don't always record my car. I sometimes record my car today. Were recording in my car. Because we've got a lot of life changes. Yes and if you don't know what i'm talking about is just even remotely interesting. You can go back and listen to the episode just prior to this one and you'll understand what i'm talking about cliff notes. We have a new roommate brittany. And it means we're making a lot of modifications modifications to the way we live our lives and the way they were able to conduct business and on our priorities all right. Let's get to topic five tips unconventional tips to help you spend a lot less time on your phone and get

Leeann Johnson
How long does it take to bust a COVID cluster?

Coronacast

05:46 min | 6 d ago

How long does it take to bust a COVID cluster?

"Welcome kathryn pie. Catherine you've been looking at new south wales datta on the clusters the cluster outbreaks. They've had a new south wales. And you've done some dada crunching. And what have you found. So what i did was. I looked at all the clusters. The new south wales has had since early july when we had the case for melbourne common. Say the crossroads outbreak which really started the new south. Wales second wife. So new south wales health defines a cluster as three people who are epidemiologically linked to what that means is there are three people who've been in physical contact with each other and also that the genome sequencing of the viruses. They have the same. So what i found was a looked eighteen different clusters that we've had in new south wales since july last year and regardless of hammy cases were in the close to what we found is that the cost is lost for about some amount of time. That's three weeks from the first case until the last case is identified so by the end of three weeks you really starting to have found nearly all of the people in that cluster. Now the problem is if they miss anyone that person can then go on and seed a new cluster. So while you got the closure of the crossroads it seeded. Several clusters didn't it. I mean you had the one in the tie restaurant thai rock restaurant and various others and they're all the all kind of trace back to crossroads eventually. So is it true to say that you closed down. After three weeks of the spawned other clusters in some cases they they did. Identify the source in others. Not so like for example. The bankstown area funeral services. The tire crest aren't whether or park by even spy soldiers club. They did not deny the source but they could tell by looking at the genome sequencing that you know it was probably headed had originally come from the crossroads hotel case but they never worked out who that individual was the that crossover between the two clusters so so infecting. What you're seeing. Catherine is well with the system. You got in place in new south wales and presumably. Victoria's well now in other states. The all now work in roughly the same basis you can expect a cluster to be closed at three weeks. But what you don't know is whether you're spawning other clusters which could then get out of control. But if they're if you apply the same methodology then you just keep on going in three week cycles their stride. And that's really what happened in new south wales so they obviously they weren't costas bang bangs sated which soda it just rolled from one to the next but the contact tracers never become overwhelmed by by the cases so they were able to cape h kloster relatively under control and have it shut down after three weeks but they would always be one or two escaped cases that would spawn. The next cost so hard we get to do not days twenty zero for the state. Yeah it's it's tricky. I think what we saw happening last year was even though the epidemiologists say it doesn't matter whether you've got too big or small. Cluster generally lasts about three weeks. The costa's be the custom. Numbers began getting smaller so when we got to october last year we had the oran park. Cluster was twenty three. Papal hawks to the private health clinic was thirteen. And so there's just less. And less people i need to talk to and i guess they can dig a lot. Deeper into those extra cases might be. And in november we got to the end of that last cluster and then we had about a month of new cases bar one which was a transport workout one of controversial things that we were talking about earlier on krona. Cast coverage of the outbreak in northern beaches was when it looked like there was. It was spawning. Other clusters are there were other leaks from overseas was say the issue of whether or not to actually lock down for a short short period of time to just get things under control. Is there any evidence that that speeds up. cluster resolution. Yeah that's that's an interesting one because when you look at these and clusters the only one where we had a lockdown like a. Real lockdown was avalon northern beaches. And yet you didn't say the cluster being shut down any faster than any of the other clusters words. So it's a difficult one to say. It doesn't seem to Circumvent the process by having a really sharp lockdown. Although you know may what what you may do is seedless clusters. So what does the data show about. When sydney's outbreak could end well sharing that they haven't been any new clusters stated that the new south wales health doesn't know about eight. It will repay from the data that we have about another week of of the baramulla cluster to run and then it will come to an end on a data journalist with abc. Thank you very much thank you. So don't we get questions about whether when the virus mutates and we've got these new strains popping up globally with the vaccines that we're getting going to be effective against them and so far we've been saying we've been hearing from experts that yes they will but there was a twitter thread by one of one of the experts in the field in the last couple of days saying that maybe the so-called uk strain the be one one seven variant might not be as effectively targeted by the fis.

South Wales Kathryn Pie New South Wales Catherine Oran Park Papal Hawks Melbourne Wales Victoria Costa Sydney ABC Twitter UK FIS
What have we learned from the Pfizer vaccine rollout?

Coronacast

02:54 min | Last week

What have we learned from the Pfizer vaccine rollout?

"It's tuesday the nineteenth of january. And so i know in that. Within the last few weeks and month there's been millions and millions of devices of coronavirus vaccines going into people's arms. All around the world and one of the front runners as we talked about in detail yesterday. Is the fires a shot. So when we've been looking at things in a clinical trial setting get an idea of safety and efficacy and all of those other scienc- words now that we've seen this thing rolling out in millions and millions of people globally. What extra detail do we now have about. Especially the sizes shot just to really tease that out. A little bit from what you said is the trials have been done on an average of maybe forty thousand people which means twenty thousand people get the vaccine twenty thousand people gates the placebo. All that tells you is does it work and is it safe. In twenty thousand people compared to placebo. So what happened. In in the phase three trials of pfizer moderna and astra is that they showed effectiveness to a varying extent and they showed that there were no serious side effects and therefore good to go to approve and release over. There are more daughter to balut tat. Which is what's happening here in australia. So that's to but rare side effects are only going to emerge after the trial just rare side effects but side effects where in the real world. You're not as selective as you are on the trial so a good example of that with pfizer. Thanks seniors the in their trial. They did not recruit people who had a history of nfl shock of severe. And what happens when it was released. One of the components almost certainly was causing antic shock and people who are susceptible and therefore. Now there'd be very careful about fis are and allergy and people with nf alexis. Let's assume for example that the norwegian norwegian cases of these frail terminally ill. Let's assume that that is linked to the vaccine. Oh vet still a question as we record this corona cast then what might happen as a result of that is even. If it's just precautionary you might say. Look people who are over. Eighty five frail and if you think that they might die in the next few months. Don't give them this vaccine just to be so you kind of refined the indications in other words the group of people for whom this gets the you get the vaccine and it's really only possible when you re rolling out to millions and millions of people and might be a one in a million side effect which is really really serious which you can't avoid by refining. Who gets it award in which case the vaccine might have to be ceased and move on to another vaccine and those are the things that you learn as you move on now. The good news as we said last week on krona cast. Was that when you look at. Israel still not being published but if you look at israel where they got really great electronic records that are integrated and they compare the people that they've immunized with the people yet to be immunized it looks as though there's reduced transmission which is really

Pfizer Moderna Nf Alexis Astra Gates Pfizer NFL Australia Allergy Israel
Bonnie Tsui On Why We Swim

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:01 min | Last week

Bonnie Tsui On Why We Swim

"Swimming in my life has changed over time. I mean it has played different roles but especially over the last year. I think about getting a water as such relief like flotation weightlessness unburdening. I think is is really what happens. Physically and mentally emotionally. I think you know you can't help respond to the medium in that way like so profound from this fire. Hose barrage of badness in the world. You know. I think just have a momentary pause from that a relief from that is just. It's such a gift because it's so easy to do and yet not everyone does it. I'm bonnie toy. And this is the rich role podcast. Rich role podcast. Hey everybody

Swimming Bonnie Toy
So Heres the Deal | Lifer Update - 640

The Chalene Show

00:50 sec | Last week

So Heres the Deal | Lifer Update - 640

"Was a lifer is going on. Hey selena i'm here with brett and what are you eating okay. And we're going to give you a lifer update. It's sunday night so this is very much in real time and i thought it would be interesting to document because we've had a lot of changes happened in the last forty eight hours and in the last couple of months and we didn't update after thanksgiving after brett's parents came here to visit with us and actually has changed since then. So thanks for being interested in this update. Oh hey and i have a positive update to share with you with regard to my plantar fasciitis so i've been having a flare up of my plantar fasciitis which is it. Feels like you're walking on glass shards when you wake up in the morning if you've ever had this it's like pain in the arch painting your. He'll and it's excruciating.

Brett Selena
The 2021 DeClutter Project Part 6 | Step by Step How to Resell Your Clothes  - 639

The Chalene Show

02:08 min | Last week

The 2021 DeClutter Project Part 6 | Step by Step How to Resell Your Clothes - 639

"Hey there as promised this episode the you need to listen to if you've recently cleaned out your closet now you're like what do i do with these really great items that i'm no longer warned to wear them but i know they have value and i'd like to make a few extra bucks. This is your episode. Now this is a classic. I release this episode right at the beginning of the pandemic. but you've just started the decluttering process. And i hope they're inspired to make some money from this. I hope you're inspired to make some money. Set that money aside and use it to start your business. Use it to launch your dream. Use it to up level your life. That's all takes you eyes in just a few weeks. I'm going to be walking you through a challenge teaching you how to sell all of these items in the meantime. I know you've just cleaned out your closet. And i know you'd like to start selling those items and trust me. This is the little stuff. You're going to make some serious money when we do this. Challenge together so be sure to get on my email list. It is very simple to sign up. Just go to selene dot com and sign up for the newsletter. I send it out once a week. I give you my best tips. I often sharing with you like things that i've bought things that make my life. A little easier tip suggestions. It's just kind of like a snapshot of the best stuff from that weak and when we start this challenge where i'm going to walk you through how to sell your previously owned items whether it's kitchen appliances furniture clothing and you're gonna love it. People make a ton of money doing this and it changes lives. This is how a lot of people launch their businesses. But in the meantime let's start selling the stuff they you just pulled out of your closet are here. We go today. You will be hearing from someone who went from having a fulltime job and just messing around with a few listings on ebay and very quickly realizing that just by cleaning out her closet. She discovered an opportunity to retire from her job. And make this a full time business. Hold up hold up now before you go. I don't wanna learn how to do this. I don't wanna learn how to sell stuff on ebay. It sounds annoying. I don't have time. I have a feeling this episode. Could

Ebay
Inside Borderline Personality Disorder

The Psych Central Show

07:12 min | Last week

Inside Borderline Personality Disorder

"Pbs viewpoint. Dr shannon welcome to the show. Well it's a pleasure and a privilege to be on your show. Gabe oh it is a pleasure and a privilege to have you here as well. Now i've been hosting this podcast for well over two hundred episodes now and i get to show suggestions fairly frequently and do something on borderline personality. Disorder is one of them. I've wanted to oblige my listeners for some time but there just aren't a lot of practitioners focusing on borderline personality disorders. Do you have any thoughts on why that could be well. I think there are a couple of reasons for that. One is that people who have that disorder are notoriously difficult to treat oftentimes having less to do with the patient and more to do with the fact that the practitioner just hasn't been adequately trained. We don't really receive adequate training and graduate programs in clinical and counseling psychology for treating personality disorders. And so a lot of practitioners. Quite frankly just aren't well equipped for treating the disorder and those of us who are well equipped who've gotten the additional training beyond graduate school there so few of us that we typically have long waiting lists. Why do you think that borderline personality. Disorder is so difficult to treat. I think it's difficult to treat. Because of the defenses that the untreated patient has are formidable. meaning defenses. there are ways that we defend against anxiety and pain and people with borderline personality. disorder have very primitive defenses. They act out. They can be very verbally abusive. They can be physically abusive. They threatened suicide. They cut themselves. They burn themselves. They oftentimes don't respect personal or professional boundaries. They're emotionally intense. They have major problems with managing their anger and their rage. I think that's one of the reasons if not the main reason why they're difficult to treat. Let's back up for a moment. What does a quick explanation of borderline personality disorder. I am so glad that you asked. The term was actually coined back in nineteen sixty by a brilliant psychotherapists by the name of otto. Kerner dr kern. Berg was the clinical director of the men iger clinic in topeka kansas which is a world renowned both intensive outpatient and inpatient psychiatric facility. And he used the term borderline personality to refer to an individual who was on the border of houses and psychosis much of the time. They're thinking and their behavior is normal tune erotic just like the rest of us but every so often when the person with borderline disorder is under unusual stress. They slip over the border into psychosis means that they're thinking and their behavior is so out of touch with reality it's delusional psychotic which makes them potentially very dangerous to themselves and potentially very dangerous to other people now according to dr karen burke and this has been substantiated subsequently with very good empirical research the number one trigger for people with this disorder that takes them from being normal to psychotic is real or perceived abandonment for reasons that we don't completely understand people with untreated borderline disorder are exquisitely some would say pathologically sensitive to any type of limits that you put on intimacy with them so if you set limits or if you set boundaries with them in any way they perceive that as a type of betrayal and type of abandonment and that sets into motion a rage reaction and they deal with their rage either by acting out towards the person who they think has wronged them or by acting in and doing something self destructive for example attempting suicide. So that's the essence. If you will of the diagnosis generally speaking somebody with borderline personality. Disorder appears as it very dramatic. Or i'm gonna go with scary. They appear very scary. Is that a fair statement that even though the treatment is effective that some people are just scared to treat people with borderline personality disorder. Yes that is a fair statement and what you're talking about is a type of what is called counter. Transference and counter transference would be any feelings at the therapist has in working with a challenging patient. That make it difficult for the therapist to work effectively with the patient. Untreated people with this disorder can be very frightening very off putting they can be very dangerous. Research indicates for example that a significant percentage of frivolous lawsuits alleging clinical malpractice or filed by people with borderline personality disorder percent of complaints that are filed with licensing and credentialing boards where the practitioners ultimately seen as not having done anything wrong ultimately vindicated. Those triple is complaints are filed by personality. Disorder patients most notably people with borderline personality disorder. So a lot of practitioners simply don't wanna work with this population because they see them as extremely difficult and they see them as potentially litigious and they just don't want to take on that liability. What are some key features of borderline personality disorder. Like what would you need to see in order to make a borderline personality disorder diagnosis. Let's start with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental which is essentially an encyclopedia of psychiatric disorders. That is written by the american psychiatric association and so it's what mental health and substance abuse professionals use for purposes of diagnosis and treatment. Planning according to the dsm five there nine critical red flags that will tell you that you're dealing with an individual who has borderline personality disorder. Now interestingly enough. You don't have to have all nine of these to be given the diagnosis. You have to have any five or more of these. So here they are one would be. You're dealing with an individual who's incredibly impulsive and unpredictable. They typically don't think about the long term consequences of their behavior. They seem to operate from a core belief that whatever. I'm feeling in the moment. I need to act on that right now without really thinking about how that behavior is going to affect them or how it's going to affect other people so the first criterion would be impulsively. Second criterion is that they have a pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships.

Dr Shannon Kerner Dr Kern Men Iger Clinic Dr Karen Burke Gabe PBS Topeka Berg Kansas Borderline Personality Disorde American Psychiatric Associati
Tips On How To Succeed With Your New Years Resolutions & Form Habits That Really Stick - 20 Minutes Fitness Episode #221

20 Minute Fitness

05:05 min | Last week

Tips On How To Succeed With Your New Years Resolutions & Form Habits That Really Stick - 20 Minutes Fitness Episode #221

"About your background and what brings you to our show about new resolutions. Yes sure so. I date i did a phd in clinical chinese medicine so we were doing medical trials. But we're using chinese medicine interventions especially acupuncture and in germany and munich germany. Running chinese medicine clinic here as studied my undergraduate in china That's where we met actually in what's called integrative medicine so that's a combination of chinese medicine and western medicine and then night at my phd is set in evidence based chinese medicine and here in my clinic. A half by a fifty percent of the patients. I have are actually your weight loss and with the new year now. A lot of these clients patients have said new year's goals of Reaching that in that health goal that that wacoal. And i've been doing this for the last five air so i saw what works and what doesn't work when making these resolutions and when forming habits and so i think i can At a few insights from what works. What doesn't in at the end of the day and we know the. Us resolutions are incredibly popular. Hopefully by now when you're listening to this actually trying to maintain your habits. Because it's not ditching day yet. Still a couple of days away from that but at the end of the day what stitching day when most people actually have good mobbed any resolutions january seventeen so almost three weeks and they give okay. I mean it's it's shocking right. I mean like we set ourselves like all these new fancy goals and white. Why actually always setting up those goals. We're setting them up because we want to become a better a purse right. It's a new year. It's time for fresh start for us. And everyone has got things about their life that they want to change or improve. And like i don't know they want to eat a quick doing something or they want us not doing something. And the reason for that is is that at the end of the day. We seeking happiness and we believe that indirectly by achieving those changes. We can introduce more happiness into our lives. like i don't know be less stressed. Have more money or losing weight. Are we actually gonna look cinna and be healthier. And then we're gonna be happier because we're going to be this better version of ourselves but at the at the end of the day. Though and that's why ditching day is ditching day. It is incredibly heart to introduce new habits. So i wanna talk about that today a primarily because we know that is such a big issue right. I mean many people stopped with new habits and get on what server you believe between six percent to about fifty percent of all people. Have you know. Give them up on their newest resolutions by mid year. And and that's kind of incredible because we come in into the new year with all these good intentions and there's something in us that that sets us up for failure. And i want to hear from you marcus because you work with hundreds of clients and and you've gone through those journeys multiple times and you've seen an officer sayers and you've seen success and of course you learn from from those experiences with every new client that you get right right. Yes so basically what. I what i saw is three things. So why people break their new year's resolutions usually first of all one of the first difficulties is they are focusing on breaking old habits that old habits and that's usually much harder than creating a new habit. I saw when day for example on twice to quit smoking now on weight loss but more on the health goals. It's usually better for them to focus on something else than to to focus on not smoking or it's better for them to pick up a new health routine like going for five minute workout. Just a bunch of pushups than to say to them to to break in old habit of eating a cupcake every afternoon. So i always i saw in clinic basically or with my clients. Is that the people who were focusing more on creating new good heads. They would then. After day picked up momentum they would automatically kind of dropped the old bad habits with the momentum of the new good heads but the ones that focused on unstoppingly are breaking these old bad habits. They would usually fail. Yeah i think. I think it's also worth exploring you know like what. What are we setting ourselves up as goals right like even like doing an inter perspective like looking at yourself like why do you. Why do you want to actually achieve that change like why does it matter to me. I think it's also important that place role right. If it's not really that important to you it's much easier to give up that that new habit right exactly so. That's actually the the second so there's three things that i've observed that i wanted to share with you and your listeners. Yup thing is the problem of the purpose that you said So a lot of people for example they wanna lose weight and they say okay i x. Amount of pounds in one way x. amount of pounds by first of june or whatever six months from now but they don't have a real purpose behind it other than this number down to this number or they want to quit smoking but they just want to quit smoking but

Germany Cinna Munich China Sayers Marcus United States
President Trump Impeached a Second Time

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

01:01 min | Last week

President Trump Impeached a Second Time

"This is an abc news. Special president trump impeached a second time article wine and site of insurrection. President trump unleash the force of a mob on this the people's house if we impeached every politician who gave fiery speech to a crowd of partisans this capital would be deserted. There's no way this helps. The nation deal with the tragic and terrible events of last week that we all condemn he muskau. He is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love. Fury's abc news correspondent aaron katersky or a man who likes to boast of his uniqueness with strings of superlatives. Donald trump. now has one more. The only american president ever impeached twice throw the is our to thirty two then as or one. Ninety seven resolution is adopted without objection. The motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. Seven days ago the capital was a battleground

President Trump Abc News Donald Trump Aaron Katersky
Listener Phone Calls

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:16 min | Last week

Listener Phone Calls

"Everybody to your podcast. Of course all the usual reminders. Please sports guys us here It is indeed a pleasure to talk to callers today. We're going to just take some calls. I've got a lot of interesting. Podcast coming up this year and carries this the new year as i speak to everybody today. Yes i believe it is happy new year. Everybody and we'll do a lot of got a lot of been. Cindy gary lots of interesting guests for the upcoming twenty twenty one. Hopefully this'll be a much better year than twenty twenty. But let's get to the phone lines to see we got and kristen. I knew i'd hear from you. Hi there how are you doing. What's going on so My question is this I've been You know. I've been teaching my kids from home since march things have escalated in regards to one of my kids in like just during with anger and we had you know an outburst last weekend which ended us having to take her to the er. Luckily she wasn't to hurt. She punched a window. There's actually a miracle. But here's my issue. So i'm trying to get her an appointment with a Pediatric psychologists but because the demand on pediatric psychology. It's so extreme right now. They're telling me they don't have openings until like february march and i don't know what to do. So how old is she. Seven and she have any pre existing conditions beyond a developmental disorder. Which is that's all. They know just a severe developmental disorder. Hasn't been specifically linked to anything. I like physiological or biological of the given any provisional names now so they have no idea what it is and so. They're not calling it to them. They're not calling it inborn error of metabolism. Just saying this child is not maturing on schedule. And what is her developmental age. Well that again is. They haven't given her a developmental age. She just tested The basically cats that they do for all children and she tested in the ninety nine percentile for math ninety seven th percentile for reading and Just cognition but it's it's just a mystery. I usually tired but usually talking about cognitive delays. So what is the delay. They're talking about maybe social behavior so severe on social and as she seen gised not. Maybe that's the best way to go about it to start sort of medical because it sounds like the kind of thing that needs some sort of chemical restraint not it doesn't sell the response to psychology is. How's the lockdown. Affected her the lockdown.

Cindy Gary Kristen
Why will most Australians get a less effective vaccine?

Coronacast

03:46 min | Last week

Why will most Australians get a less effective vaccine?

"This is an abc podcast. Hello welcome to corona cost. A daily point cost all about the corona virus. I'm health reported taking tyler. Journalists alter norman swan. It's thursday the fourteenth of january teagan. You live in brisbane. Tell us what went on yesterday with this quarantine telling these people having to do probably another fourteen days in quarantine. Yeah i really hot really goes out to them. So the good news is that it's contained well so far it seems to be contained within the hotel but it looks like six cases that we knew about have all been genome mickley tested and found to be associated with these cycle. Uk strain of the virus. And they're all connected to each other and all six of these people stayed on the same floor of the same hotel where they were quarantining. Which means that. There's been some sort of transmission. Well the assumption is that there's been some sort of transmission in the hotel. Everyone else who is staying in the hotels be moved to a different one. Now that go to quarantine for another fourteen days but it really seems to back up this sense that we've had about aerosol spread and the potential that this uk strain is more transmissible than maybe what we've seen before. Yeah i mean it's terrible those people and it's unfortunate where we still got an expert group. That's advising the government doesn't truly believe in aerosol spread but anyway the queensland government's doing the right thing moving them on and dealing with the grand chancellor hotel. It's certainly an informative case study. it's not the hotels fault hotel wasn't designed to be a quarantine facility. Which does raise this issue. That comes up again and again. Which is that. Should we have more tailored facilities like howard springs elsewhere for corentin that some hotels does not fit for purpose even though they might be very nice places to stay on holiday. Yeah so that's an active discussion in another really active discussion. Stralia at moment is the vaccine situation. Who's going to get what vaccine so just to recap australia's on track to get access to or to approve two different coronavirus. Vaccines is one from fayza. Biontech and there's one from oxford strelka but the two vaccines are quite different defies. A shot has like ninety five percent efficacy based on the studies and the oxford. One has a lot less than that. But it looks like we're only gonna get enough of the fiso one to vaccinate maybe five million people it's going to be prioritized for the people who are most vulnerable kind of everyone else is gonna get the oxford one. So we've got simony questions from people and a lot of them. Cluster around the question of why most australians going to get a vaccine that looks a lot less impressive than what we know is possible when it comes to fighting corona virus country. I just wanted to chain. Just want to alter one thing that you say. Is that the head of the therapeutic goods administration before christmas indicated that in fact they were going to get data from johnson and johnson from their vaccine. So this is not one of the vaccines that the government's got an arrangement with but i think they've made a preliminary application and all the last forty eight hours. The ceo of johnson. Johnson has said that they're going to be releasing their phase three trial data in the very near future. Now this is an adenovirus vaccine which is one which called virus. If you'd like carries the corona virus spike into the cell. A bit like the astro vaccine and the chinese vaccines. But it's a one dose vaccine rather than a two doors vaccine so really interesting vaccine. It'll be really interesting to see what they come up with this. This the johnson and johnson one and we'll possibly be another option. The tj seemed to save before christmas that this was on the table for approval which is interesting even though we haven't got a business arrangement with them as far as we are led to believe.

Norman Swan Teagan Howard Springs Stralia Oxford UK Tyler Brisbane ABC Queensland Government Johnson Government Therapeutic Goods Administrati Australia