Wellness

Listen to the latest on healthy living tips, the importance of keeping fit and how to manage the lifestyle you want, from audio aired on leading podcasts.

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

Bodies

02:55 min | just now

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

"No one talks to girls about their cervical fluid. It's like denying semen exists. It's denying that you sneeze and blow your nose. So your cervix do you know what your cervix is? This is me about four years ago. It's like taking a lesson with a woman named Tammy Rubin. She's a certified fertility awareness and reproductive health educator. I can't guarantee anything for you. I can just tell you the science and what I've learned and what I want to touch on. So the events leading up to finding Tammy a chronicled in the first episode of bodies, sex hurts. You can listen back if you want all the details, but to summarize, when I was 24, sex became painful. I told my doctor, but I was dismissed. And I was having a really negative impact on my relationship with my then boyfriend. And then, through a friend, I learned that it could be the birth control pill that was causing the pain. I'd been on the pill since I was 18 and never given a second thought. But then I started looking into it more and yes, painful sex, as well as low sex drive and trouble lubricating were all potential side effects of the pill. So I went to an o-b-gyn specialist who confirmed that it was indeed the pill that was causing my issues. He told me to stop taking the pill, use a topical hormonal gel to get my hormone levels back to normal and go to pelvic floor physical therapy. I did all three things and after about 6 months, the pain went away. And honestly, my sex drive was better than it had ever been. And so after I got off the pill, I did not want to take hormonal birth control again. But I didn't want to get pregnant either. Condoms are fine contraceptives for the time being, but they didn't seem like a sustainable solution for the rest of my reproductive life. I started researching and came across this thing called the fertility awareness method. And at first I was like so the rhythm method that very unscientific way of guessing where you're at in your cycle. But as I learned during my sessions with Tammy, it's not the same thing as the rhythm method. Once you see that fluid, the fertile window is opening. And the change in cervical fluid marks the beginning of your fertile time. Turns out my body and the body of anyone with a menstrual cycle since two major signals over the course of a cycle. And if you can learn to read those signs, you can figure out on your own when you're fertile and when you're not fertile. This truly blew my mind. And so for the final episode of season three, I wanted to devote this episode to the fertility awareness method. How it works, how it can be used for contraception, why it's vital information for people trying to get pregnant and why it especially matters for people with polycystic ovarian syndrome or PCOS. I'm Alison berenger and from KCRW, this is bodies. And a heads up,

Tammy Rubin Tammy Pcos Alison Berenger
A highlight from Anxiety Sisters Unravel the Panic & Anxiety Spectrum

The Psych Central Show

07:27 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Anxiety Sisters Unravel the Panic & Anxiety Spectrum

"Thanks so much for having us. We are delighted to be here. Can you explain to our audience what anxiety is? So here's the thing about anxiety. If you're human, you've had it. It's a broad topic because we've all experienced it. But by the same token, the type of anxiety that mags and I like to work with and deal with is the kind when your brain gets a little bit wonky and the part of your brain that responds to fear is a little trigger happy and therefore creates a situation where a person experiencing anxiety thinks he or she is under a threat that actually is not there that doesn't exist. You know, fear is protective. If you see a grizzly bear chasing you, you run, because that's going to save your life. And that is not anxiety that's fear. But if you're standing in the grocery store, reminding your own business and suddenly start feeling all those symptoms like you're being chased by a bear, that's anxiety. That's where your brain is perceiving danger where it doesn't in fact exist. And there's a huge continuum of anxiety, right? I mean, it goes from just mild stress over things, which we all experience, all the way up to folks who can't even leave their home because they have so much anxiety they don't want to leave their house. And I'm glad you came in with a continuum because that's definitely really important. So many people think that anxiety is just like one size fits all, right? We don't think physical health is one size fits all. I mean, we don't think that every broken leg is exactly the same, but many people do believe that anxiety or any mental health is just, oh, I have it too, where exactly alike? Yeah. Yeah, and another problem with another difficulty that arises because it's mental health is that it doesn't get the same. It doesn't have the same gravitas as physical health. For example, if you break your leg and you're wearing a cast, no one is going to ask you to climb a flight of stairs. In fact, they're going to help you to the elevator. They might even bring a casserole to your house for dinner later on. But if you have anxiety, people can't see it. It's an invisible disorder. So people are not going to be so inclined to help. As a matter of fact, a lot of us, the help we get is someone saying, relax or calm down. And we all know that in the entire history of calming down, no one's ever calmed down by being told to calm down. Full disclosure, I suffer from panic attacks where I'll just be standing there mining my own business and my heart will start to race. I'll get all sweaty. I become just paralyzed. That's part of that continuum, right? That would be in the very serious disordered category if I'm stating that correctly. Is that common for people to have when they say I have anxiety or is there a more centralized anxiety that people are discussing when they say I have anxiety? When they're saying I have anxiety, I think panic attacks are pretty common. There are many different types of anxiety that people can be talking about so some people just have worry, they just worry excessively about everything. Some people catastrophize things, which means that they kind of make a mountain out of a molehill about everything. Some people have specific phobias where they're scared of, I don't know, driving on the freeway or driving or flying or some other type of situation. But I think panic attacks are a very central part for many people of anxiety. And gave in any given year, 284 million people suffer from anxiety disorders in the world. So it is exceptionally common. It's so surprising to me that you say that it's exceptionally common because I always felt like I was alone. Whenever I had a panic attack whenever I had anxiety, I thought that I was the only person in the world who was suffering. Is there a reason that people don't talk about this so much? Because you would think with 284 million people, nobody with anxiety would ever feel alone. You know, the most common thing we hear from people in our anxiety sisterhood. And we should just say that when we say sisterhood, we really mean any one of any gender. But the truth is the most common thing that we hear from our community, people say to us, I didn't know anybody else felt this way. People are reluctant to talk about this. There's been a mental health stigma since way back. I think in many places it's still very stigmatized and there's a lot of shame and blame that goes around with things that are called mental illnesses. So that's why mags and I love to call it brain illness because it really locates it in a place. It's in your brain, in fact, it's an a part of your brain called amygdala. You can see this part of your brain on an MRI. It's not a made up ethereal thing, and it's not something we should be ashamed of. I think also sometimes it's very hard to understand like you may hear that your friend has a panic attack, right? But it's very hard to understand what that actually feels like in reality. So a lot of times what abs and I do is try to describe some of the things that may happen when someone's very anxious or when someone's having a panic attack. More often than not, people tend to say to us, oh, I didn't realize other people felt that symptom too. A good example is we just were talking on our Facebook page about itching, getting very, very itchy when people are very anxious or even when they're panicked. And so many people said, I thought I was the only one that happened to. I never heard about this before. So a lot of times it's thinking that a symptom or an experience is your unique symptom of it or experience, but it's really much more universal than. You might believe. So just to make sure that we're all on the same page, how would I know if I was having a panic attack? Well, you could have any number of symptoms because each of us is different and we have our own unique presentations. But as mags pointed out, there are some really common ones that we all share. So I guess the classics would be cardiac symptoms like maybe racing heart or palpitations or even chest pain, shortness of breath or dizziness, also stomach upset is very common in a panic attack either nausea or excess gas can have things like headache. You could have itching, you could get a rash or develop hives. One thing mags and I always say is that anything the body can do, any sensation it can produce any sound can make in any fluid it can produce can happen during a bag of that. And if you find yourself having a panic attack, what should you do? Well, the first thing we like to say is the hardest. Which is, do not fight it. The goal is not to stop your panic attack because the more you fight, the more intense the panic attack can get. So we often use a rift tied analogy. You know if you're in the ocean and there's a riptide happening, you can't swim to shore. If it's a strong rip tide, no matter how good a swimmer you are, you can not make it to shore.

Anxiety Disorders Facebook Panic Attack Dizziness Nausea Headache
A highlight from Train Yourself to Take Action

THE BRENDON SHOW

04:54 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Train Yourself to Take Action

"So here's my question. If you could take just small actions every day to improve this month. Could you make a list right now with the small actions could be? Could you make a list of where those things would be? Just some small actions. If it was health, maybe like, okay, I'm going to meditate every day at 2 o'clock. Great. Just to get your mental health back in check. Or it's like, oh, you know what? My finances. I'm going to start saving a dollar a day. Or you're like, oh, I'm going to you know, if it's in your relationships, I'm going to start complimenting my wife more. All those things consistently applied. Shift everything. The small actions compound into big character changes. I and my clients when I think about them, they're a result of a lot of conversations that awareness opened, acceptance happened, accountability was taken place, and then we just moved them forward a little bit. Moved a little forward, small actions, and over a period of weeks and days and months, as we developed them, all of a sudden they were like feeling better. And reporting is astounding results, you know, in our certified high performance coaching program, we have a score, which is basically a client driven score of how they rate each session. And they can score on a zero to ten basis. The industry average is somewhere around a 6.7, maybe to 7.8, depending on the certification or the school. Ours is a 9.7 out of ten. Why? Because we focus on habits. We focus on high performance habits, and they're action oriented. If you're ever at high performance habits, the research behind that is pretty clear. These are action ordered. High performers seek clarity. They generate energy. They raise necessity. They develop influence. They demonstrate courage. Each of those first words, do you ever hear that? They were verbs. Their action words seek. Generate raise develop, demonstrate. Got it? It's like, as we do those things, oh. Okay, what happens? It feels like all of a sudden life transforms over 12 weeks and survivors coaching. We coach people for 12 weeks, 12 week sessions. And sometimes it's 12 weeks, and we keep going. Sometimes, 12 weeks and we're done, just spend on the client. And what happens is it's like dramatic transformations. Because we're putting them back in that action gate. A lot of people, you know, the difference sometimes between their counseling or their therapy or their conversations with their family, their friends, it's very ruminative. It's lots of conversation. Lots of things. We're high performance coaches. We're going to shift people back into that action mindset without asking crazy transformation, but across a series of habits for us, as we help them shift into action in their psychology or their physiology or their productivity or their people skills, what ends up happening is it feels like everything goes up. I really think chefs. Okay, my friend, I hope you enjoyed this episode of the Brennan show. Tell some people about this episode. It's on each of us to spread positivity and empowerment during these times of chaos and negativity, right? So I'm asking you to be the dealer of hope and personal growth and education in your tribe. So take a screenshot right now and share the screenshot and this link to this episode with three of your Friends today. Post it on social media, use the hashtag growth day that's hashtag growth day because that's the name of my company. And we're always giving away prizes to our community. If you'd like to help me personally, then please rate and review the podcast on Apple podcasts. Give us some stars, cheer us on, leave a review because believe it or not, that stuff actually really does help. And I read all of them. So my last thought for today, please remember, you are stronger than you think. And the future holds good things for you. Tomorrow can be an inspired today. Every new morning is a second chance. Every day is a great day to grow. We're thankful to have you here and the growth day community. So be sure to go deeper with us at growth day dot com.

Apple
A highlight from Struggling to Focus? Top Tips from ADHD Coach Gloria Joy Sherrod - 764

The Chalene Show

07:28 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Struggling to Focus? Top Tips from ADHD Coach Gloria Joy Sherrod - 764

"To be speaking with Gloria, joy sharad, who is a licensed professional counselor with a master's in counseling, psychology. She is also someone who has ADHD. And two children. Not only does she believe in the importance of understanding mental health and is an advocate for it, but she's also the author of adulting with ADHD, which is such a freaking great title. Gloria, it is awesome to have someone on the show who like really truly understands all of this. Plus, you're a mom, a mother, too. So super excited to dig into our content today. Absolutely. Thank you so much for having me. So tell me how is it you, your self discovered, and at what age you had ADHD. And I'm assuming you have a formal diagnosis. Yes. So I always felt like I had ADHD, but as we'll talk about later, mental health was just not really a thing in my family growing up. So I kind of chug along and tried my best. And when I was in my master's program, it kind of all finally fell apart a little bit. I didn't have the structure that I had previously with jobs and with school and everything. Everything was kind of like up to me to decide. So at that point, I tried to get a diagnosis. I went to my primary care physician and she did not understand what I was talking about. She's like, if you're getting a master's degree, how is it that you have ADHD? And so I didn't actually get my diagnosis till after my master's program when I had better insurance to go to a specialist and that's when I got my formal diagnosis at 26. Let's start there. I think this is not an uncommon occurrence. I've heard from so many people in my community who have gone to their maybe their general practitioner or someone they've been treating with for a really long time and they're like, you're just whatever. You've just got brain fog or you don't seem hyper, you don't have ADHD or they assume that they're trying to get medication for some reason. And I think it's not uncommon for people to either have their practitioner their doctor dismiss their symptoms, not believe that they're accurate. And so have you found this to be true in your own experience? Absolutely. There are so many different misconceptions about ADHD in general. And they are in the medical community as well, not just, you know, people outside of the medical community. So, yeah, it makes it difficult for people to get a diagnosis and there's the misunderstanding that, you know, you can't get good grades and have ADHD, you know, it has to be the hyper little boy who's struggling in school and can't sit down and that's the view we have of it. So yeah, a lot of that. Any recommendations for someone who maybe has had that experience in his little frustrated or discouraged. Absolutely, seek a second opinion, I would say a psychologist who does assessments is the best way to go because at least then they can't just dismiss you. They actually have to do the test to tell you why specifically they think you do or do not have ADHD. So, you know, doing a little bit of research and background on you, I know that you grew up in a family where faith was really important. In fact, if I'm not mistaken, your father is a pastor. And I know for many people in the social and the Christian community, I don't know if it's all religions, it's one of most familiar with. Sometimes there's this, I don't know, stigma almost attached when it comes to mental health and diagnoses. Because for lack of a better description, you should give it to God. You should turn it over to God. He's the one who can handle all of your problems. And so sometimes there's this, I don't know, reluctance, if you will, to consider mental health services or counseling services. So in that you were raised in that environment, did you also face any of that stigma? Oh yes, absolutely. As I said, I always knew that I had something going on. And my ADHD causing anxiety as well and depression as well. So I was always kind of dealing with those things and yeah, it was pretty much, you know, give it to God or pray about it. And my parents have definitely evolved from that since then, but that was definitely a huge issue for me growing up. And now, you know, they have allowed me to come in and share the importance of mental health at this point. And, you know, understanding that it's the same thing as going to the doctor to take care of your mental health. It's not separate from your spirituality or your life, but they're all important. Is that how you approach the subject with your parents 'cause I'm sure there's people listening right now who are like, I'd love to have some tips on how to talk to my parents about this or my family members or maybe it's themselves. You know, I mean I have friends who sometimes struggle with the thought of seeing a counselor who's outside of the church because again, they feel like it's betraying their faith. So any suggestions on how to either quiet that voice in your own head or have that conversation with friends and family. Absolutely. That is exactly how I approached it. I don't think that I'm the one that convinced them I think that life convinced them a bit over time. But definitely kind of explaining the fact that the same way you go to the doctor and take care of yourself because your physical health is important going to a therapist or a counselor, you're taking care of your mental health. And you can still also go to church and take care of your spirituality. So none of those things need to be in conflict at all. What about the stigma associated with medication? I don't know if you take medication for your ADHD. I do, I take a low dosage of Adderall. And then a variety of supplements that really help me to stay cognitively as sharp as possible. Of course, I do all the lifestyle things too, and I think that really makes a big difference. I don't think anyone should just rely on medication. There's so much we can do in terms of lifestyle. But with regard to medication and again, not everyone's form of ADHD or degree of it requires medication, but I do know that there's stigma associated with that. And you know, your parents all the time, thinking that their child is asking to be diagnosed with ADHD because they want those stimulants or they want to be medicated because for other reasons and using almost ADHD as an excuse. Yes, I hear that a lot. It's funny because there's this big thing about students using ADHD medication to help them focus. And what they're finding is a lot of the students who end up doing that are actually students who needed it in the first place. So interesting to see how that works. But interesting. It is, yeah, so I would say that people think that it's unnatural, you know, or a crutch. I hear that a lot. And when you think about ADHD and the brain, what it's helping you do is something that neurotypical brains do naturally, which is absorbed the dopamine in your brain to help you with that motivation and task initiation and those things that we struggle with with ADHD. And so what it's really doing is making your brain do something, it's supposed to do already that it's not doing. Yeah. What about the notion that it's addictive in my child or my loved one will move from one of the more common medications prescribed for people with ADHD into whatever the next thing is or that they're going to get super addicted to it and they won't know how to stop and they're going to have to keep titrating up their dosage. Not at all.

Adhd Joy Sharad Gloria Depression
A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

Therapy for Black Girls

06:53 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

"We had new routines, our gyms closed, our stress increased, and sadly, many people who are struggling with weight gain and weight regain are afraid to talk with their physicians in fear of being humiliated or talk down to. Despite what you might hear, weight itself is actually about so much more than diet and exercise. There's also science behind weight loss that may be making weight maintenance a challenge. So if you're struggling right now, we encourage you to work with the healthcare provider who can help develop a weight management plan that works for you. Watch HBO Max's new comedy series, the sex lives of college girls, now streaming. Get ready for another comedy series from Mindy Kaling, full of books, butts, boys, and four females who are a bundle of contradictions and hormones. These hilarious women stumble toward adulthood as they dive into new experiences, neck and parties, air rushed abs and caution tape dresses, refusing to be shamed for any of it. No rules, no regrets. Watch the sex lives of college girls now streaming only on HBO Max. It's important to note that healing looks different for all of us, and that each of us might find different things helpful. Joining us to chat about how he link can happen through sound meditation and breath work is linnaeus Smith Crawford. Linnea is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Holistic healer, wellness expert and entrepreneur. She earned her bachelor's degree in psychology from spelman college and her masters in marriage and family therapy with a certification in trauma therapy. In addition to her degrees, she's an advanced certified yoga breathwork and meditation guide, sound healer. International teacher and speaker. She specializes in holistic mental health and healing, which she defies as the return to wholeness through the blending of practices of the mind, body and spirit. Linnea and I chatted about the definition of holistic healing, how things like sound meditation and breath work and support healing, how to find someone appropriately trained to offer these services and she shares a special sound bath just for our community. If there is something that resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share it with us on social media using the hashtag TB G in session. Here's our conversation. What are we talking about when we talk about holistic healing, especially when it comes to mental health? Yes, so I have started to use holistic healing and holistic mental health interchangeably, but essentially what it means is that we are tuning into all aspects of ourselves. We are honoring that we are multifaceted and that in order for us to truly heal, we have to be able to integrate all layers of self. So our physical, our emotional, our energetic, our thoughts and our spiritual aspects to create this safe container for healing. Got it. And so some of the things that you use as a part of your practice are both breath work and sound healing. Can you tell us a little bit about how you have developed these wellness practices as a part of your life and how they've been beneficial to you? Yeah, absolutely. So I have always loved things like meditation and yoga and breath work. And I've always understood how necessary they were for healing and for our mental health. So much so that I completed my yoga and meditation teacher certification while I was finishing up my masters. While I was in grad school, I think, you know, you can also maybe relate to this, graduate school is probably one of the most stressful times in a professional's life. And so I really was able to lean into the power of breath work and yoga and meditation and ultimately sound feeling while I was going through that really stressful period. And I started to notice my colleagues and my peers were on the verge of straight burnout, right? And I had a sense of calmness about me. And it was at that point I really realized that things like breath work and yoga and sound feeling are really necessary for us, particularly in the most stressful times. And so with that realization from my personal practice, I wanted to integrate it with my work as a therapist. And so I definitely try to do it on my own or I tried to ask my supervisors for guidance as far as integration goes. And back then, it really wasn't like it was forever ago. It was almost 5 years ago, right? But we've seen how much this whole concept of holistic mental health and holistic healing has really taken off in the last I would say 5 years. My supervisors looked at me like huh, like girl just refer them out to a meditation teacher, just refer them out. We don't do that as therapists. And so that was ultimately the beginning of my journey of integrating these practices into the therapy room and in the mental health space. You know, I really appreciate you sharing that because I do feel like the people who are training now and in the future will have a very different experience of gray school than it sounds like we both had because it feels like we have learned so much more about how all of these things are integrated, but our training isn't typically integrated in that way, right? And so a lot of people have the same kind of story like you around like going back to get certified in yoga and meditation to supplement or compliment what they do in the therapy room. And so can you talk about how you have brought both of those things together and how things like breathwork and sound healing can actually complement traditional therapy. Yes, this is one of my favorite things to talk about. And to your point, we don't get this training in our master's program and still now it's not really a part of the curriculum. And so that's one of the reasons I created the holistic therapist academy, which is essentially to teach therapists and mental health professionals how to ethically integrate and confidently facilitate trauma and from yoga, breathwork and sound healing to help clients heal from anxiety depression and trauma. And so when you think about the major diagnoses, anxiety depression and trauma are really the top three that many of our clients face and a lot of society goes through. And so breathwork and sound healing is so beneficial for those diagnoses and just like stress overall. And so when we talk about this feeling of stress, when we talk about being in our fight, flight or freeze, right? Breathwork and sound meditation and sound healing ultimately help us to calm our nervous system. So in our nervous system, we have our parasympathetic and our sympathetic our sympathetic and I know you know this, but for the audience, the sympathetic nervous system is our seat of fight flight freeze and there's many other responses, but that's essentially our bodies knowing that we're in danger. That is when the bear comes out in the forest and we have to freeze or we're in danger. We're experiencing

Linnea Smith Crawford HBO Mindy Kaling Spelman College MAX Anxiety Depression Trauma
A highlight from Working In the Office Is a Scam with Dr. Devon Price

Food Heaven Podcast

07:37 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Working In the Office Is a Scam with Dr. Devon Price

"Welcome back to another episode. We have one of our favorite things. Okay, I'll stop talking go ahead. Just as excited. Love them. I mean, I'm thrilled over the moon. Doctor Devin price is a social psychologist, professor and the author of laziness is not exist. I was the bio that they submitted to us. But we have so much to say about them. They've been on the podcast before. Talking about this whole concept of laziness and productivity. And Devin has one of my favorite Instagram accounts. It's like just so insightful, always giving me something to think about thinking about things differently, especially as it relates to work, productivity, creativity, and they covered so much today. Yeah, so the reason why we brought them back on the podcast was to talk about their latest article on medium, which is about productivity. And basically how we've all been working from home. We've been more productive, however, managers are forcing people to go back into the office and it's literally a scam. And what the research has to say about all that, my favorite thing was how many hours they recommended that people work per day. It's going to shock you and I'm going to try to switch up my whole life. And really just getting into all the nitty Gritty on why we should be allowed to work from home, how to advocate for yourself, what that would look like. So it was an amazing episode. I was nodding the whole time. You guys are gonna love it. Make sure to listen to the very end because Devin actually has a second book coming out and you want to learn about that. Before we jump into the episode, I am going to read a listener review from Sims 7 two 6 and they write impactful. It's like you pick the titles out of my brain. Sometime I hope you'll end up doing a certain random topic and then Wednesday morning I'll see the thought I had as the headline. It's amazing. So helpful and relatable. So much new and applicable information that I truly find myself applying to everyday life. This podcast is a gift that keeps giving. This is one of my favorite reviews. I was just thinking, I'm like, wow, this was very thoughtful. I actually was checking the reviews the other day. I'd usually check like once a month, and I was like, that's a really nice one. Thank you so much. Appreciate you. Also, wanted to let you know that on Monday, December 6th, we are going to be doing an IG live event. We haven't done these in a minute. So it's super exciting market calendar is going to be a 7 p.m. eastern. And we are going to be teaming up with MS advocate Azor antonette. We're going to be talking about the important role of food and nutrition for people who have chronic conditions and chronic pain. For people who have multiple sclerosis, it could be really hard to do a lot of these changes that are promoted as healthy. And so we're going to be talking about potential considerations that people should take into account, living with a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis. And I am actually going to be doing a food demo. We're going to be cooking, so come through, Jess and I will be there. Azoo is going to share her insight about how she approaches nutrition as someone who's been living with MS for over ten years. And this event is part of Janssen's more to MS campaign, which supports people living with MS with educational resources to help them live well, to learn more, you can visit more to MS dot com. Make sure that you join us. It's going to be on our page. So you can go to food heaven on Instagram, December 6th, at 7 p.m. eastern 4 p.m. Pacific. All right, y'all. Let's get into this episode. All right, welcome back to the podcast Devin. Yeah, hi. Thanks for having me back. So do you feel like you are an Internet superstar? Because you are. I'm just wondering how you internalize everything. Oh, God. I don't know. Definitely when I get really weird DMs, that's what I'm like, something is going on here. And is it me? Am I giving people the wrong expectation? Yeah, that was my second question was what are your DMs? Right. It's all over the place. Like a lot of times it is really, really nice stuff that is like also still so heavy or like overly familiar that you don't know what to do with it. I would imagine you both have the same thing too. Like if you're talking about any vulnerable topics, people get a really strong emotional connection to your work, and it means so much to them. And of course, I know how it feels to be on the other side of that and to have work really connect with me. But it's really hard to know, what do I owe to people? I can't emotionally show up for all of them. It's just a weird, it's a weird feeling. It's kind of overwhelming. Yeah. And it's like you're posting so many thought provoking whether it's articles or Twitter threads or Instagram stories. It seems like a part time job, if not a full-time job to be able to think things through enough to post and have an opinion that is like, I'm always like, oh, yes, this is like hitting the nail on the head. I think I just get over caffeinated and then I just go off. Okay. And then whatever happens happens, I don't know. It's totally this weird bloodletting for me. Yeah. It feels like there's always some kind of stimulant or like another guest who has very great thought provoking pieces said that they just do an edible. Something kind of helping to channel all of the ideas. Okay, well, so you were on our podcast a few months ago talking about your book, laziness doesn't exist, which hopefully everyone has got that book already because it's incredible. And you recently wrote this article that was shared with me, actually. I'm like, wait, oh, this is Devin about productivity and kind of this whole work from home. Slash transition into the office, culture that's been happening. And so the article is titled productivity will go down this year, but you probably won't hear business leaders talking about it. On the articles on media we'll link to it so you guys can check it out. Can you talk about what inspired you to write about this article? And for people who haven't read it, just like a cliffs notes version of what your point is. Yeah, so one thing that I have noticed time and time again in the management literature and the organizational psychology kind of literature is there's this huge gap between what the data says is best for people as workers and what managers and bosses want to do and what they believe about human nature. So this has been a problem for years. We know from the data that when people have flexible schedules, when they have some degree of autonomy over what work tasks, they take on and how they divide up their day. They thrive when they have enough time off. They do higher quality work. And they are just a more quote unquote worthwhile investment for their organization. They're likely to just stay there for a long time and do really good work. And despite all of that, repeatedly, you'll see managers acting like those things are luxuries that it's like a kindness that you aren't entitled to to give that kind of humane treatment to their employees or even that if you give people that flexibility they're going

Devin Devin Price Azor Antonette Azoo IG Sims Janssen Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis Jess Instagram Twitter
A highlight from Whats Your Sexual Fantasy?

Sex With Emily

01:08 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Whats Your Sexual Fantasy?

"People have been asking me, so what's changed after 15 years of doing the podcast? Well, a lot has, but to be honest, the orgasm gap still remains a challenge for so many couples. You know what I'm talking about? Men tend to finish before their female partners. So you've heard me talk about promethean for years, so urologists developed FDA compliant delay spray can help men last up to 64% longer without loss of sensation, and because promession is quickly absorbed into the penis, it won't transfer to your partner. Oh, and speaking of your partner, I think we can all agree that sometimes women, even when alone still have challenges around reaching orgasm. So now, promession is created a new female arousal gel. I love it. It's a clitoral stimulant she can rub into her clitoris for grease pleasure and a lot more satisfaction during pretty much any sexual activity you can think of. So now, they got promes and delay space for ham, arousal gel for her, so basically they're closing the orgasm gap on both sides. Trust me, try this combo thank me later. Seriously, right into feedback at sex with Emily dot com and tell me how it went. I want to know. So try for message today. Go to sex with Emily dot com slash enhance. That's my site sex with Emily dot

FDA Emily Emily Dot
A highlight from Tom Bilyeus EYE OPENING Keynote on Success & Life Will Leave You SPEECHLESS

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Tom Bilyeus EYE OPENING Keynote on Success & Life Will Leave You SPEECHLESS

"The reality is when I started my life, nobody thought I was going to be successful. My own mother, quietly assumed I was going to fail. My best friend said, oh, I just assumed you were going to marshmallow your way through life. My father in law, when I asked for his blessing to marry his daughter, he said, no. They were right. I was wrong. I go on to build a $1 billion business, but I start laying in bed. 5 hours a day, not knowing how the fuck I'm going to make my dreams come true. So the question is then how did I become successful? And the only honest answer is, the very reason you're here, which is the only thing that matters is skill set. Soon is about to get really real. So here is what we're going to do. I'm going to put myself on a high wire act, which is that very shortly you guys are going to get access to a microphone. And

A highlight from Savage Lovecast Episode 788

Savage Lovecast

02:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Savage Lovecast Episode 788

"Denver riggleman was a very conservative Republican from Virginia, and still is a very conservative Republican from Virginia, a state that was trending blue until the recent unpleasantness. Riggleman was a member of the rapidly conservative house freedom caucus. Those were the Tea Party crazies who now seem positively sane compared to the Trumpist crazies. And then rigelman made the mistake of officiating at a gay friend's wedding and social conservatives freaked the fuck out, funded a primary challenger and rigid lost his seat in 2020 despite being endorsed. By Donald Trump rona Romney mcdaniel, she's the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee and Mitt Romney's niece because we live in a meritocracy. Never forgot that we live in a meritocracy. Anyway, last month, mcdaniel rolled out a big new campaign to attract low information LGBT voters to the GOP. She called it the RNC pride coalition. And days later, mcdaniel had to issue a shit eating apology because social conservatives were demanding her resignation. The RNC pride coalition, which was her idea, was quietly euthanized and mcdaniel sent an email out to social conservatives, reaffirming the Republican Party's opposition to same sex marriage, as well as its support for dismantling anti discrimination statutes that protect LGBT people from discrimination. Just so we're clear on who and what the GOP is where queer people are concerned. They hate us. Still. And yet, every four years, every two years, every 6 months, the LGBT community gets gaslit. By bullshitting self paid and gay conservatives and mainstream media outlets looking for a new story to tell and the story they like to tell us, constantly is that gee whiz, maybe today's GOP isn't as anti gay or anti queer or anti trans as it once was. Yeah, no. They're still anti LGBTs to anti gays to antique queers to anti trans. If anything, the anti gay anti queer, anti trans rhetoric from the right, is getting worse, not better. Take, for example, North Carolina lieutenant governor, Mark Robinson. He is a rising star in the GOP. He's running for governor of North Carolina. And he's doing most of his campaigning from the pulpits of tax exempt churches that shouldn't be tax exempt. And Robinson is given the GOP base, what it wants. Anti gay, anti trans hate. There's no other word for it. You just give a sermon at the baptist church in Winston Salem in which he said, well, I'm not going to read it myself. It's on YouTube. Let's

Republican National Committee Riggleman Mcdaniel Rigelman Rona Romney Mcdaniel GOP Virginia Donald Trump Tea Party Denver Mitt Romney North Carolina Mark Robinson Robinson Winston Salem Baptist Church Youtube
A highlight from 20 Legit Ways to Make Extra Income - 763

The Chalene Show

03:21 min | Last week

A highlight from 20 Legit Ways to Make Extra Income - 763

"I'm going to just get your creative juices flowing. I'm going to cover 20 of the most common ways for people to make money online. Now there are more than a hundred different ways that people can make money online. But today I'm going to cover some of the more popular and more realistic ways for you to make money online. Now, all of these ideas, all of these business opportunities fall into one of four different online income categories. The first of which is a reseller, the second of which is a promoter that someone who's promoting something that they didn't they themselves create invent or develop. The third type is what we call a provider that someone who's providing a type of service may be creating some type of online course, digital information, or other type of online service. And the fourth falls into the category that we call producer, a producer is someone who produces content or produces a product such as a water bottle or journals. Apparel, fitness equipment, but in order to fall into the producer category that means that you are the products producer, creator inventor, that you are the person who is brought this product to market. It's your invention. You own it. You've created it or in any event you own the rights to it. I will break down which of these four categories is the quickest and the easiest to start making money with, but before I do that, I just want to give you these 20 ideas and get your wheels turning. And then we'll talk about which one you might want to start with. Again, to make money online as quickly as possible. At the top of the list, becoming a virtual assistant. Now this can be done on any number of websites that offer freelance work and consulting work for people who can do just about anything online from liking photos on Instagram, editing podcasts, scheduling interviews. Managing somebody's inbox. Let's face it, most of us have a lot of work we have to do every day on our computers, whether that's paying bills, getting our kids enrolled in classes. Scheduling a flight, booking that vacation rental, organizing your Dropbox. Uploading YouTube videos. Most of us can do these things, we just don't always have the time to do them ourselves. And that's one of the number one reasons why virtual assistants are in high demand. Next and perhaps one of my all time favorites is becoming a reseller. That means that you are using typically a free app such as poshmark, eBay, mercari, depop, or Facebook marketplace, to sell, used goods. This can be done to create additional online income in your spare time or you can turn it into a full-time business. It has been our experience that this form of making online income is one of the quickest, the easiest and the most successful way to launch somebody into business. Now that's not to say that you'll stay there. But you've got to start with something, and that's why in a future lesson, we'll spend a lot more time breaking down what it takes to start reselling online. Next up is network marketing, also known as multi level marketing, and guess what? Long, gone are the days of somebody knocking

Dropbox Youtube Ebay Facebook
A highlight from Your Life Is Now: Mike Posner On Walking America, Summiting Everest & Crafting Hit Music

The Rich Roll Podcast

00:55 sec | Last week

A highlight from Your Life Is Now: Mike Posner On Walking America, Summiting Everest & Crafting Hit Music

"Evers was so dangerous so death so close that the looking cool cease to be something that was pulling me up. Word on the mountain, it became something that was pulling me down. It was like, hey, man, if that's the reason right here, you should turn around. You know, and it was just only to have pull me up with that commitment, man. But it's hard to do anything. You know you walk from where I'm sending to your city, I would be breathing like this. Like it's, I mean, I can't explain the altitude how bad it made me feel, you know, it's different people differently and I was another part of my journey. I go in the tent one night it can't too with John. John iron our tent, and I hear when I was rumbles and stops for a second and then all of a sudden our

Evers John Iron John
A highlight from Reinvent Yourself with Sheri Salata

Ask The Health Expert

03:55 min | Last week

A highlight from Reinvent Yourself with Sheri Salata

"Hey, it's JJ and welcome to ask the health expert, but this isn't just any old ass to health expert session. This is your bonus session. Yes, it's the weekend and because it's the weekend, we are gonna take some time with an amazing expert. So be on the lookout for these Saturday asked the health expert bonus sessions where we're gonna go deep into an amazing subject with an incredible expert to give you actionable items that you can put into your life. Hey, it's JJ here and today's show is fascinating and fun because we are going to be talking about we're going to actually blow up this whole concept of midlife. I don't know about you, but that just kind of makes my skin crawl. I was like, how did I get here? Wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute. I still feel like I'm, you know, 30. And we're gonna reframe that as middle of life. And today we're talking about kind of reinventing yourself and really figuring out where you want to be not what you want to do and we're doing that with my girlfriend, sherry salata, and met her a couple of years ago, she was actually the speaker, the keynote speaker at a charity event that I had in my house. And I hadn't met her before, and she's speaking, and I'm falling just in love with this woman thinking this is going to be my new pal. She doesn't know it yet, but she's gotta be and now she is. And I just love the book that she's written. It's called the beautiful now. We're going to be talking about this. You may know her from the sherry and Nancy show. This is 50 pillar life. And also you may know her from Oprah. Yes, I said, Oprah. She was she worked at Oprah for 20 years in executive producer for the last 5 of it and produced the famous season 25 and was co president both Harper studios and own so she has some amazing stories to tell, but really the biggest stories are the stories of her kind of waking up to her own life and where she wanted to be. And as you read this book, the beautiful now, I call it the highlighter book because you're just kind of relate you're gonna go oh my gosh, she's in my head with me. And there's so many great stories and so much inspiration. And what I really love is that she's put a workbook together to go with it, which makes so much sense because as I'm reading it, I'm literally highlighting things, writing down notes of things that I want to do. It is the book that will inspire you motivate you and help you see new possibilities for the next phase of your life. So you'll be able to get those and the show notes at JJ virgin dot com. Forward slash the beautiful no. And I'm just beyond excited to share this episode with you now before I do, I want to do a shout out to bua DM bodham, bottom from the USA who said left a little 5 star review on Apple podcasts is awesome, easy to understand and incredibly informative. Subscribe and looking forward to the next episode. So thank you so much for that. Love these reviews because, you know, when you're sitting podcasting, I'm literally podcasting right now from the corner of my bedroom because I'm in a temporary space while we're waiting for our house to be to close over here in Tampa, my new world. And so, you know, sometimes you're over here going hey, anyone listening over here, so these reviews mean everything to me. And this is definitely one of those shows that you're going to want to share with all of your friends. Believe me, this I can't wait. Anyway, I can't wait. I'm not going to waste any more time. I want to share one more favorite with you. And then I will be

Oprah Sherry Salata Harper Studios Sherry Nancy USA Apple Tampa
A highlight from Listener Calls

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:14 min | Last week

A highlight from Listener Calls

"Doctor pinsky, Twitter at Dr. Drew and also TikTok at Dr. Dre tried to do some live pods there. Live, what do you call them Sessions, I guess. And also doctor a TV we're doing live streaming shows mostly Tuesday Wednesday Thursday but sometimes we mix it up throughout the week, but at least three times a week we're getting on there with very interesting guest. As I said today, we are just going to be doing your calls. So let's get right to it. This is Sam. Sam what's going on? Uh oh. Hold on. There you are. Sand what's up? Hey, how are you doing, doctor Marley? Good, mommy. What's up, jeans? Hey, so I have a brown question. It's kind of weird. It's been happening to me a lot lately and I've been wanting to ask you. So whenever I go Brown my nose starts running, it's every single time. Not to blow my nose. Interesting. Have you ever heard of that? I mean, nose blowing and nasal congestion is a funny thing. People, it's a product of our autonomic nervous system, right? Something causes the vessels in our surface of our nose to dilate, and that dilation causes fluid to come out and that's what you're blowing out. And that vaso dilatation can be caused by lots of different things for some people at sexual arousal for some people it's urinating for some people's defecating. It's just a leftover function when you learn how to control your bowels probably that there was some sort of honor. Your body had a reaction to it in some way. And or maybe it's just part of your wiring. Maybe it doesn't even develop. Maybe it's just that that's your wiring. It doesn't mean anything. It really does it. It could be a nuisance, like a yacht, a lot of people get it with sexual arousal or orgasm and it sort of they start sneezing and things and it can be unpleasant for the partner or something they want to try to control. But nothing, it's good browning. Good browning, my friend. It's all good. All right, well, I appreciate it. Thanks, Sam. And what Sam was talking about, calling me a mommy and all that is that your mom's house where I have a podcast called doctor drift argument. I'm going to check it out. It's also a YouTube. You get that you can find on doctor dot com. And we have a lot of fun over there. I swear to God, the booth boys and I have been getting it on quite interestingly. And I just went down to Austin this last week and had a bunch of reunions, so here we go. Are you guys in a real studio yet or is it still in Annie's living room? It's sort of extra bedroom. But I like that. I like the cake. You know, I like chaos. Sure. And so a million followers on YouTube and we're doing it out of the guys. But they're all moved down there. And it has a beautiful house, by the way. It's not an apartment. It's a really nice house. Okay. And they've done a great job setting up the studio, but it's clearly fly by night and we have a handwritten sign behind me. Yeah. But I've seen it. It's an interesting look. It's just I guess what I'm sitting here is a listener kind of confused by and I'm sure Tom, I could send Tom off a ledge if I were to bring this up. But I thought the whole point of moving to Texas, people don't fuck with you. How is it so hard to build a studio? It has something to do with where they're building and I think in the city. They're building an Ian Austin. Okay. And you're right. People that he's having more trouble with the construction than he expected. I don't know if it might be even like materials and things. Now, that would make sense, but the way he's playing it off on the podcast is as though it's a regulatory problem. I know, I know. I'm a short pissed him off. I'm confused as a California. It seems appealing to me to flee to a state where no one's going to fuck with me. And then I hear about these people trying to do it. And they have all the money in the world. Yes. And I will tell you, there is no masks in Texas. Yeah. Except visiting Californians and New Yorkers. Oh, your mind drew. You don't have to go to Texas. Come down to our county. It is on. That's why we that's why we hide out down there. But it is interesting how this mask thing has become a social phenomenon, not a medical issue at all. Oh, it's a virtue signaling, I'm a good person type of thing. It seems. It's weird. Yeah, it's a different world down in Orange County. There's a 30 miles. There was a great study. I haven't talked about on this podcast. We're a Stanford researcher, looked at Stanford students, riding bicycles. I think I talked about this. You talked about it on a and D, which is essentially revealed 20% helmet wearing, 60% mask wearing. Outdoors riding a bike with let's just state the facts. Zero probability of COVID transmission outdoors riding a bike. Zero row. This virus does not move through a moving air. It can't. And so zero probability, high probability in your head riding a bike. And yet the smartest students in the country are over there, just biking away, we're in their masks. Good times. I went right in the other day and somebody recoiled for me because I didn't have a mask on. That is that's not science everybody. And by the way, the whole notion of follow the science, I think that's a misguided notion. Science is a discourse. It's a dialog. It's not the interpretation of science as a social phenomenon. It's not science. Let me talk to Sam. Sam what's going on?

SAM Doctor Pinsky Dr. Drew Dr. Dre Marley Ian Austin Youtube Browning Twitter Texas TOM Brown Annie Austin Stanford California Orange County
A highlight from Kickstart Your New Dream

THE BRENDON SHOW

05:54 min | Last week

A highlight from Kickstart Your New Dream

"How do you start a dream that scares you? I get this question all the time. People say Brandon, you know, I know you started your books and you left corporate America and you've been through a lot and you've built all these different brands and these different web properties and these different things. How did you do it all? Weren't you scared? And I say, yeah, I was scared, but that didn't stop me. And I know how hard it can be though. If you've got a big dream and you're just trying to figure out, how do I start it? Especially when it scares me. It scares me because I don't know how it'll turn out. It might compromise my position at work. It might freak out my spouse, my wife, my kids might not understand it. Any time you go to change something, it's scary and starting a dream is ultimately change. Starting anything is change. So it's first and foremost to realize you're just responding to starting a dream, the same way you respond to almost any change, right? People say, well, I must not believe my dream enough. No, you probably just are scared of change in general. Once you master change, then anything starting a dream or starting any new thing, period gets a little easier. So let's talk about what the real hard matter is. It's dealing with change. In starting a dream is learning how to deal with change. And so let's talk through how can you do it in a way that supports you, but it gets you going. First and foremost, primary thing you have to do is be honest. Why haven't you started the dream? If you got the dream and you haven't started, why haven't you started? Well, it's convenient to say, well, because I'm scared. And most people are lying to themselves. They're not scared. They're just, they're uncertain. They don't feel capable. They're not really scared. It's not fear. It's very popular to say, well, people are just fearful. And the reality is they're not. Often, they're uncertain, often they're worried, often what's really driving them is that they don't have competencies or capabilities in that area. And if they did, they would do great. Sure we can say, well, they're scared they're gonna fail. But most people, I think, as adults, they can more conscious. They just get in a rhythm of how much action they're willing to take during the day or not. And so more often it's lack of discipline and sustained motivation is an issue more than it is fear. They don't want enough, they don't hunger for it enough, and they don't orient their days to go get it. And that's the honest truth. The honest truth is not fear is putting them on the couch and they're curled up in a ball and terrified. They're gonna fail. No one's gonna love them. No, they wanted it. They'd never stayed focused on it. If they don't focus on it consistently, they'll never start the dream. See, it has to be something that you obsess about a little bit. You pay attention to a lot. You start willing yourself and working yourself each day to move towards. That's how you start. It doesn't have to come with, look, I don't even care if you deal with your past stuff or your past issues. At the beginning of starting a dream, I just need you to go, okay, let's get in the game here. Let's start. Let's do something. Let's take some action. So after you're honest with yourself, and honest with yourself, also requires you if you're like, well Brennan, I'm very strong. I'm not one of these weak willed people who are driven by fury, you don't understand, Brett and I pile up for freshness. If you are a perfectionist, you're also not being honest with yourself. If you have not started the dream and you're saying it's because of perfectionism, you're lying. Please watch my YouTube video on perfectionism. If you were actually a perfectionist at least you would be accurate and every perfectionist by accurate definition would understand perfectionism to perfect something can only happen after you've completed and released something. After you've already done it, perfection comes after you've done it. Now you start perfecting it and getting better at it and zooming it in and dialing it in. It only comes after you've done it. So if you haven't done it, if you haven't started, don't fool yourself and tell yourself you're a perfectionist. What you are is scared, what you are is uncertain. What you are is incapable so far, you don't have the competency, the confidence, the will, the attention, the energy, whatever it is for you. And by the way, I'm not here to tell you what your issue is. I'm just here saying, be honest. Discover what it is. Is it really fair? Is it lack of hunger, motivation, focus, attention, energy, health? What has it been that is delayed you from starting that? Be honest. Once you're honest with yourself, you take back the power of your life. You start to activate your personal power, get now, we can start moving on. Hey, it's Brandon jumping back in here again. Are you looking to go the next level in your life right now? The next level of joy, abundance, success, then you already know that you need to journal about your lessons learned in your life, you gotta track your moods and your habits. You have to learn from the best personal development coaches and teachers in the world, and you got to stay inspired and accountable so that you can be more focused, disciplined, joyous, and keep growing. That's what the growth day app is gonna help you to do, my friend. It's the world's first all in one personal development app. It has all of the tools you need. All the coaching and the community that you need to level up to progress every week to track your breakthroughs and to keep growing in every area of your life consistently over the long term. So go start your transformation right now at growth day dot com or just download the growth the app on your phone right now. Every day, you can keep improving. Every day, we are here for you and every day is truly a great day to grow together. So let's make self improvement a way of life. Let's make that self improvement stick. Go to growth day dot com right now.

Brandon America Brennan Brett Youtube
A highlight from Best Of: Sexy & Self-Aware w/ Lewis Howes & Lisa Bilyeu

Sex With Emily

00:57 sec | Last week

A highlight from Best Of: Sexy & Self-Aware w/ Lewis Howes & Lisa Bilyeu

"Ask yourself a simple question. Why do these things have power over me? The ultimate human being does not allow for past things to own him to control and consume his energy in his thoughts. He has power and control over his parents fighting with him. Whatever happened, the girlfriend dumping him. He doesn't allow the past to conserve his mind and control him. You're listening to sex with Emily. I'm doctor Emily, and I'm here to help you prioritize your pleasure and liberate. The conversation around sex. I like to think of Lisa Billie and Lewis howes as leaders in the self awareness world, especially when it comes to relationships. Both Lisa and Lewis are incredibly successful. She went from housewife to cofounder of a $1 billion business. He went from picked last for dodgeball to pro athlete, New York Times bestselling author and Uber successful podcaster.

Emily Lisa Billie Lewis Howes Lisa Lewis New York Times
A highlight from This Is How You Achieve LASTING Change By Rewiring Your BELIEFS | Jonas Kaplan on Conversations with Tom

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:39 min | Last week

A highlight from This Is How You Achieve LASTING Change By Rewiring Your BELIEFS | Jonas Kaplan on Conversations with Tom

"Jonas Kaplan welcome to the show. Thank you. Happy to be here. I am very happy to have you as I was saying before we started rolling. Anything about the brain, beliefs, like all that stuff is my absolute sweet spot, my total obsession. And as somebody who studies this for a living, I want to start with the idea of beliefs. I think beliefs govern your behaviors, behaviors govern your life, therefore, the quality of your life is basically the quality of your beliefs. But most people I have found, mistake their chosen beliefs for objective truth, and they don't realize that they have chosen throughout life to believe things, whether their parents told them to, or whatever, but they have decided that certain things are true. Talk to me. How do beliefs get formed? Yeah, that's right. So they can form very early in life almost through osmosis, the brain starts to build models of the world. I mean, if you think about what the brain is there for, that's the way I like to start the brain. What is the brain there for? Really, the brain is there to keep our bodies alive. The brain is a complicated solution to the problem of homeostasis, the problem of maintaining a complicated organism like the human body. Do you have a thesis on why we developed really big brains? Well, our brains could have been bigger. I mean, it's interesting about the size of the brain isn't necessarily the important thing. High powered intellect. We want smart brains, right? Not necessarily big brains. And actually what happened is the brain got wrinklier and wrinkly or to fit more and more surface area in the same head. Because if we just kept getting bigger and bigger heads that becomes an issue, that's the issue I'm walking and all kinds of stuff. But do you have a thesis on that? Was it for locomotion? Was it for something else? Is it for social cooperation? I think all of those things. I mean, basically, problem solving as life gets more and more complicated. There are more and more problems to solve. Some of those problems are motor problems. You know, how do I get inside this bottle to get a grape that's stuck at the bottom? Some of them are social. How do I deal with living within a community of individuals where everybody's got different attentions and different beliefs and I have to navigate that whole situation. So it's not one thing. The brain is an in many ways a general purpose problem solver. But all of those problems do have to do with maintaining life and keeping us alive. And as part of doing that, the brain builds a model of the world that it has to navigate. It builds a simulated picture of what the world is like. That's where police come from. That's the basis of belief. Some of them are built into us from the course of evolution itself. We have beliefs about gravity and about shadows that are built into the very perceptual system that we have. Meaning, no matter what you're going to have those. You're born with them. And they are going to influence how you understand the world, how you see and how you hear. And I would touch things. Now respond to them. And then optical illusions or illusions of some kind that reveal those things. There's so many optical illusions, for example, when you have you can show that two different patches of light on a page that look very different to us, one looks dark gray. One looks light gray. Actually result from the same amount of light hitting our retina. And just because one of them falls within the cast shadow of an object, the brain reasons that it must be actually lighter and it's darker because of this. You see that test for the first time. It seems impossible. I remember thinking, nope, this, they're playing a trick and they're leading me to try to make my cognitive dissonance. Go away or something because there's no way these are actually the same color. And then you fold the paper and you're like, what the fuck? Is the most bizarre experience? We believe our perceptions. We believe our eyes. And it's very convincing to see something. It seems like when you see it, it's out there in the world as it is. But perception is a constructive process. The brain is making hypotheses about what's out there. And it's confirming and disconfirming those hypotheses. You remember the whole blue dress, yellow dress they bring this up. I still can't fathom that other people see it differently. Right. Which way? I don't remember now, but I remember when I saw it, I was like, what do you mean? Either I saw it as blue or gold. I don't remember which. But I was looking at it going, well, this is obviously blue. Let's say. And I was like, I don't understand how it is even remotely conceivable that people see it as gold. I still to this day. It's really hard to believe. It just seems like they must be completely wrong. But they're messing with me again. I was like, it's not possible. Because there are some optical illusions. And the reason that I want to go in on this for anybody listening is there are some things that are hardwired to your point about evolution has given you these things. So the idea of gravity hardwire, the idea of shadows means something hardwired. Things going more blue at distance, hardwired, like there are just all these things that our brain uses as born in context to make sense of the world. The point is to get people to understand that these things that you perceive are constructed realities, they are not objective truth, and that will have deep implications. I'm sure as we continue this conversation, it certainly has deep implications in people's lives. But how convincing these perceptions can be is really jarring. So going to the blue gold thing, what's going on there? So the shadow I get, so your brain goes, oh, something in shadow means that some of the luminosity is being blocked. It's not actually changing the color. Yeah. But the blue gold one. Brain is making two different assumptions in two different people about the context of the color.

Jonas Kaplan
A highlight from Lisa Feldman Barrett || Surprising Truths about the Human Brain

The Psychology Podcast

08:02 min | Last week

A highlight from Lisa Feldman Barrett || Surprising Truths about the Human Brain

"Barrett is among the top 1% most cited scientists in the world and has been called the most important affective scientist of our time. In this episode, doctor barret reveals what the true function of the brain is, and it's not for thinking. We also discussed the impact of past experiences on our cognition and what we can do to overcome our own detrimental patterns. Further into our discussion, doctor Lisa Feldman Barrett challenges the traditionally held view that emotions are universal. In her own theory of constructed emotion, she argues that variability in emotional expression exists due to socialization and language differences. We also touch on the topics of hallucinogens, culture, education, relationships, and authoritarianism. This was a really stimulating conversation, and while we don't see eye to eye on everything, she really brought into my mind and has me thinking of new ways of thinking about emotions and the brain. So now I bring you, doctor Lisa Feldman, Barrett. Doctor Barrett, so great to chat with you today on the psychology podcast. It's really great to be on the podcast. Thanks so much for having me. I've wanted to talk to you for a really long time. You're a real leader in this field and the way that you think about it is quite quite unique and different from some of the things that a lot of people are even still being taught in introductory psychology textbooks. True. We got to update this. We've got to do this. Now you started your research career in we started your career as a clinical psychologist. Is that right? So that was your dream of going to clinical? I don't know that I would say that was my dream. That was just where I ended up certainly. Fair enough. Yeah, you know, I had the choice to take the more academic route in cognitive psychology or the more academic route in actually or potentially practice space route in clinical psychology and for number of reasons chose clinical psychology, but you know, my adviser was a social psychologist. I had one clinical in one social adviser, so I would say I always had like one foot out the door. You know, even when I was training to be a clinician, I'm glad that I have clinical training. I think it's actually served me really well in my research career, but. Early on, it became clear to me that I just really loved research and I really loved the science end of things. Yeah, and you're curious about everything because you've really, you started adding on other fields that you started integrate into your work. But you see that even early in your career, you know, where you're spend a decade training in psychophysiology and neuroanatomy and neuroscience and actually after I was a professor. So. You know, and eventually I made my way back to cognitive and other even adding on other fields. So I think that's one, you know, maybe one thing that. Marks my work is different or the work that I do with my colleagues and the lab that I developed, so all my peeps over the years is that, you know, we read broadly and we draw broadly from a number of different disciplines with in psychology and also outside psychology. And that just gives you a really different perspective on psychological questions, psychological mechanisms and the underlying biological basis of those mechanisms. Yeah, I completely agree. And I was really excited to see you get into evolutionary developmental neuroscience and cultural evolution, systems engineering. All of these kind of perspectives give you a systems view of the brain, which is, I mean, it's so clear how that links to your theory of emotions. Because if you take very discreet view of emotions as a very modular view, I should say, right? You could see how that's in some ways antithetical from a broader systems or network perspective or could be. Yeah, exactly. I think, you know, early on, it occurred to me that in psychology, really throughout the history of psychology. So psychology really, the history of the field where the field comes from is, you know, that in the 19th century, physiologists and neurologists and philosophers realized that there was the possibility of using the mechanisms and the labs, the lab procedures and so on of neurology and physiology to search for the physical basis of mental categories that have existed really in mental philosophy going all the way back to ancient Greece. And when you take that approach, it sort of suggests to you a very modular approach where a word like episodic memory or semantic memory or anger or sadness or fear refers to some specific set of psychological processes or a process which can be found in some modular part of the brain. But when you start with the brain and the nervous system and how it develops and how it evolved, and then you ask yourself, well, if you know where certain type of creature with certain type of nervous system in a certain type of brain, how is it that, you know, nervous system in the context of other brains and nervous systems? Of other people. How does that produce the thoughts and feelings and mental events that we have in that we experience in this culture, but that are not general to all cultures in the world, right? So you have really a single kind of nervous system architecture that can create many different types of minds. And so how does that work exactly? And it's not denying the fact that we feel anger and sadness and fear, but it doesn't presume that there are ancient circuits for these emotions embedded somewhere in some ancient beast lurking in your brain somewhere. It's a very different approach to start with the biology and then ask started asking questions about the psychology than doing it the other way around. Yeah. Yeah, I mean, I know that a question a big question you're interested in is why do we have a brain? Why? Does the brain exist it's so metabolically expensive and you've given answers such as it for regulation of our senses and for prediction. I know that prediction is a big one. And I've described the brain as a prediction machine. But I want to take the question one step further because even more intriguing to me is why do we have a neocortex, like why not just a brain, but why do I say we mean me and you? Humans, why do we have a prefrontal cortex? Why do we have a lateral prefrontal cortex? Yeah, so let me just say that there's really debate amongst evolutionary evolutionary neuroscientists as to whether the neocortex is actually new. Right? So there's some there's one way of looking at evolution, brain evolution, which suggests that the neurons that create the so called neocortex, the more neutral term is isocortex. Actually, our present in all vertebrates. And our even present in animals that don't have a cortex, a cerebral cortex, like birds, for example. But there are homologous neurons there.

Lisa Feldman Barrett Lisa Feldman Doctor Barrett Barrett Barret Greece
A highlight from Donald Trump and Narcissism

The Psych Central Show

05:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Donald Trump and Narcissism

"Doctor massena is on the medical staff of suburban hospital, Johns Hopkins medicine. She wrote the book aftermath healing from the Trump presidency and is an expert on narcissism. Doctor Messina, welcome to the show. It's such a pleasure to be here, Gabe. I really delighted. We are delighted to have you now in the past several years whenever I do a show on narcissistic personality disorder, the guest will inevitably cite former president Trump as a textbook case during the show. However, this is the first time that a guest has written a book on the subject. Now, I know that using any public figure as an example of anything is going to polarize the audience. However, not every public figure has a following willing to attempt overthrowing the government at their suggestion. As an expert doctor Messina, have you found that your book steals focus from your work on narcissism? Well, I think sometimes I mean courage not to talk about president Trump. While he's a poster child, I have been in groups and they've asked me not to measure my book. So hopefully that answers your question. It does. It does answer the question. So let's start at the very beginning. Doctor Messina, what exactly is a narcissist? Okay, so narcissist and I don't know if there's healthy narcissism. There are people with narcissistic traits and there are people who have a narcissistic personality disorder. I would say Donald Trump is in the latter category. When people have a disorder, it's as if they're like an egg. On the outside of an egg on the shell, you could hit it with your finger, maybe something else feels pretty sturdy. Once you crack that, everything follows that. It oozes out. There's nothing left. And narcissists often talk about when you can get them to talk about it about feeling empty. So it's like when the egg is cracked, they sometimes fly under the radar though. And not when they're blatant as the former president or people like that. But some narcissists are most of them are very charming. They can be attractive and funny. But women narcissistically injures. In other words, when the egg does crack. That's when they're so internally or psychically bruised, people refer to narcissistic injuries often. Whether narcissistically injured, that's when the other side of them come out. And all of a defense has come out. In narcissism is characteristic of people who lack empathy. They don't really understand another person, nor do they care to try to figure out what another person is feeling. I knew somebody many years ago. And this wasn't my patient, but he was in treatment for many, many years. And he learned how to say the right things. If someone came home, he knew to say, oh, hi, how was your day? But he didn't really care. He would talk to me about it. He didn't really care. He just learned the right things that one is supposed to say, what is going to be in a relationship? But generally, relationships don't work out too well. Not equal relationships. They are really, really entitled. They think they deserve certain things and just because of who they are. It doesn't matter whether they are these things. They just think they're entitled entitled to whatever it is that they want. And when they don't get it, they often have this narcissistic injury, this crack. They lack accountability. They have a great need for control and on the other side of that coin is that they're very threatened when they lose control. They typically lie, are very grandiose. They are the best. The greatest and the best and I mean, we certainly know that the former president would talk about that often talked about himself as being great, wonderful. A very setting in rallies. Very manipulative, often haughty and arrogant. They have black and white thinking. It isn't a gray world with good and bad, which brings me an amazing defense of narcissists, which is projected with identification. But just to simplify, that means that they shift plans. It's never them. It's always somebody else. And we certainly saw that a lot in the last administration. One of the criticisms that always comes up when sighting a former president is, well, they all do it. They all do it. I must have seen this in my email a thousand times. Well, you're picking on this particular politician, but they're all narcissist. Now even in research for this show, I see that politicians are often listed as having narcissistic personality disorder or they're called narcissists and the media. What set Trump apart? Because I noticed that you didn't write a book called aftermath healing from any other administration. Yeah. There's no healing from the bush or Clinton or any other administration as you're right about that. I think because Donald Trump actually, as you pointed out, I mean, certainly there are theories about and I believe we did try to overthrow the government. But he's right on the money in terms of being a narcissist. If you look at every single descriptor, you'll find that Donald Trump does fit in the category of that description. However, I would like to say that there is a range in the narcissistic spectrum.

President Trump Messina Doctor Massena Medical Staff Of Suburban Hosp Gabe Donald Trump Clinton Bush
A highlight from On The Move

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

00:59 sec | Last week

A highlight from On The Move

"Wow, look at that. We are walking inside high bay two here at JPL, a clean room where spacecraft are built. Workers below and white suits carefully building a spacecraft that this time next year if all goes according to plan will be far away from earth on its way to an asteroid in deep space. The asteroid is unique because it's not made of rock or ice for the first time humans will be exploring a world made of metal. There's this one asteroid of just a handful that appear to be made mostly of metal and there's only one that's really big and mostly round and that's psyche. Linda Elkins chandon is a vice president in Arizona state university and the lead of the NASA's psyche mission, a spacecraft being built right now about the size of a car that will explore the asteroid named psyche. The mission is psyche. So exciting to me as you might imagine. It's always a thrill to talk about it every single time because it's so exciting to me. With the proximity of the asteroid. For humans, asteroids have long been objects

Linda Elkins Chandon Arizona State University Nasa
A highlight from A Masterclass on Addiction & Recovery

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:10 min | Last week

A highlight from A Masterclass on Addiction & Recovery

"20 years ago, I was that guy was broken, lost, utterly alone. My mornings typically began with a vocal tonic in the shower. It generally ended up in a blackout coming to and all manner of strange compromising situations with no idea what I've done or where I'd been. Other than this vague, but very real feeling of just incomprehensible demoralization. There was nothing sexy romantic or rock and roll about it. It was really just sad, empathetic. And of course, I knew I was an alcoholic. I'd known it forever. But no matter how many times I tried to start, I just couldn't. Because there's a huge difference between self knowledge and actual change. I was unable to change until I was willing to let go of everything. Everything I thought I knew about how to live how to think, how to be and simply raise my hand and let other people help me. Amazingly, I did find a way out. And today, my life is just a miracle, a miracle I could have not possibly imagined when I came to and that treatment center 23 years ago.

A highlight from How to Take Accountability For Your Life

THE BRENDON SHOW

05:13 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Take Accountability For Your Life

"Accountability means, you know what? My credit card bills, those are mine. I'm accountable for handling those. Instead of avoiding them, I am personally responsible to deal with these. Even if I didn't cause all these problems, I am now the person who, if I'm gonna clear the problems off my plate, I gotta take some personal accountability for that. I am now the person who gets to choose my attitude today. I am now the person who expects myself to follow a higher standard and to follow through. Personal responsibility or personal accountability says, okay. I'm going to own this reality. I'm going to plan my way through it. I'm going to follow through. And I'm going to set up checks and balances to make sure I do that. Where that setting goals and tracking and measuring the goals and my own behavior towards those goals or getting a coach sharing socially in the community or talking with your friends and family and putting it out there, now your butts on the line and you gotta do it. I think that's what's important. So often we say, you know, I have dreams. I'm not gonna tell anybody. And often in person development you hear people say, no, tell people. Because once you verbalize it, you can realize it. Once you verbalize it and it's socialized, now there's an expectation you follow through. Here's my question to you. Do you have enough expectations to follow through? Often when I work with CEOs as their executive coach, what ends up happening is they have that kind of maybe they have investors and their investors expect them to stay on path. Maybe they need to hit their quarterly goals. But when something happening is sometimes they start feeling like they're accountability is driven by others and often high performers feel all these obligations. They are accountable, but they're accountable to obligations to other people have set. And if you want a real fast tracked being demotivated, stop setting your own plan. Stop setting your own accountability. This is why, for me, as I told you, I go in my plan section of growth every day. I look at all those plans. I'm like, I'm behind on this. But I don't get discouraged. I just make a plan on how to handle it. Sometimes I look at them like, I don't like my score here with my friends. I went three months without really talking to my Friends. I don't get down on myself. I make a plan. I don't fall prey, that victim part of myself that says, but all these other things are happening and oh my God, okay, got it. I don't like that. I'm the only one in charge of the ship. You're the only one in charge of those scores. And once you realize that you're like, okay, I'm accountable. What's my plan? Because sometimes you left your accountability to your boss. You left your accountability your manager. You left your accountability your spouse. You left your accountability to the kids. You left your accountability to somebody else and you didn't internally own it anymore. If you ever been seminars before, I'll talk about this for a while. And then I'll get the whole audience up. We'll play this music. We'll do the lights and all of a sudden we'll have everyone start shouting. I own my dream. I own my dream. I own my dream. To help them realize again, they're the owner of their life. You own your dream. You own that impulse in your heart that says to get better. Once you are the CEO of your life, not just the follower. Everything shifts for us. And that's accountability. Hey, it's Brendan jumping back in here again. Are you looking to go to the next level in your life right now? The next level of joy, abundance, success, then you already know that you need to journal about your lessons learned in your life, you've got to track your moods and your habits. You have to learn from the best personal development coaches and teachers in the world, and you got to stay inspired and accountable so that you can be more focused, disciplined, joyous, and keep growing. That's what the growth day app is gonna help you to do, my friend, it's the world's first all in one personal development app. It has all of the tools you need. All the coaching and the community that you need to level up to progress every week to track your breakthroughs and to keep growing every area of your life consistently over the long term. So go start your transformation right now at growth day dot com or just download the growth the app on your phone right now. Every day, you can keep improving. Every day, we are here for you and every day is truly a great day to grow together. So let's make self improvement a way of life. Let's make that self improvement stick. Go to growth day dot com right now.

Ceos Brendan
A highlight from Can Your Marriage Survive Infidelity | Part 2 The Unfaithful with Hasani & Danielle Pettiford - 761

The Chalene Show

04:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Can Your Marriage Survive Infidelity | Part 2 The Unfaithful with Hasani & Danielle Pettiford - 761

"Ladies and gentlemen, thank you so much for joining me today. I've got two incredible people who are doing in my opinion God's work and helping couples figure out how to stay together after an affair after infidelity after a betrayal and betrayal can come in many different forms. Today, we are talking to Danielle and hasani PETA Ford. And these are two folks who specialize in doing exactly that helping couples come together. Recovery after an affair and they've been doing this for many years helping hundreds and hundreds of couples figure out how exactly that is possible to have a better two relationship. Today we're specifically talking to them about those things the unfaithful partner needs to make happen, what they need to do. Some of the biggest mistakes in pitfalls that they want to avoid and those things that they need to do to improve themselves to make that transformation possible in their relationships. So Danielle and hasani, thank you so much for joining me again today. Thank you. See you guys have been together for a long time, married 19 going on 20, got four kids. Yes, ma'am. You've been through some highs and lows I have to assume. Of course. Of course. I think our pain turned into our purpose and that allows us to do what we do. Isn't it so interesting that I think a lot of young couples I know this is true for me when I specifically remember at my wedding shower. There was this game where they went around the room and had each of the women give advice and all the older women now they're probably like my age, but at that time, they were like older women and they I remember them all saying like, it's gonna be hard. You're gonna have some really lousy years, but stick to it. And I remember thinking, I don't want to hear that like, no, it's gonna be all unicorns and rainbows. And those really, really low points in our marriage, are the reason why I think people look at us today and say like couples goals because there's these periods that before social media, and even during social media, like, you don't take a photograph of the two of you when you're in the middle of a fight. We see everybody's highlight reel, but honestly, one of the reasons why we are so in tune with each other, we are so emotionally connected and our relationship is so much better today is because we've worked through some really ugly gnarly times and in fact betrayal. So people who listen to or tuned in on my show, you probably are aware of the fact that I discovered that my husband had been gambling for like ten years of our marriage. And when I did discover it, I first thought that there was infidelity going. I was certain that he was cheating, and I was ready to I put on my investigator hat, and did all the research and I saw all the phone numbers on the phone bill and when they were 800 numbers, I thought, oh, this is must be a porn line. The secrecy, the behavior, the tension between us the lying, the things that didn't add up, it all in my mind, women's intuition. I'm like, there's an affair going on here. But it was, in fact, a betrayal. And I think that anyone who's listening who's experienced betrayal whether it is gambling or drugs or an affair, it's really difficult to move forward from that. But we often point at the unfaithful partner and we villainize them. And for my own personal experience, once I made the decision that I wanted to stay, I realized, why would he stay in a marriage if I was making him feel horrible? Why would he stay if all that I could dump on him was more pain and shame and embarrassment and what would be the motivation for him to change because as we know people are motivated change when they feel loved and it was really hard to make him feel loved when I also wanted to pinch his head off. So I wanted to have you guys back on the show today, just speak specifically to the spouse or partner who was the unfaithful one. And if you can share for us, what are some things first of all the week kind of need to understand and keep in mind when we're talking to the partner who was unfaithful? We did a last chance weekend, and there was a gentleman who began to share. And he said, you know

Hasani Danielle Ford
A highlight from How to Navigate People Who Constantly Use Triggering Diet Talk

Food Heaven Podcast

06:44 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Navigate People Who Constantly Use Triggering Diet Talk

"Happy holidays y'all this week we are doing something a little different. We are going to be rearing one of our most popular episodes, which I think is super timely during this time of the year. And it is how to navigate triggering diet and body talk, especially during the holidays. You're already know how that goes. You show up to these family gatherings or gatherings with your Friends and everybody got an opinion about how your body has changed, especially with COVID or the foods that you're eating, the foods that you're not eating. And so I think you're really enjoy this episode. We really touch on practical things that you can do to navigate these things. Also, wanted to let you know that on Monday, December 6th, we are going to be doing an IG live event. We haven't done these in a minute. So it's super exciting market calendar is going to be a 7 p.m. eastern, and we are going to be teaming up with MS advocate Azor antonette. We're going to be talking about the important role of food and nutrition for people who have chronic conditions and chronic pain. For people who have multiple sclerosis, it could be really hard to do a lot of these changes that are promoted as healthy. And so we're going to be talking about potential considerations that people should take into account, living with a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis, and I am actually going to be doing a food demo. We're going to be cooking so come through des and I will be there. It's always going to share her insight about how she approaches nutrition as someone who's been living with MS for over ten years. And this event is part of Janssen's more to MS campaign, which supports people living with MS with educational resources to help them live well to learn more. You can visit more to MS dot com. Make sure that you join us. It's going to be on our page so you can go to food heaven on Instagram, December 6th, at 7 p.m. eastern four p.m. Pacific. All right, y'all. Let's get into this episode. So what are we talking about today, girl? Girl, today is a heavy ish heavy ish topic. We're talking about how to deal with diet talk. And this has been requested actually a lot. And it almost kind of indirectly because people may send us a DM and say, hey, they want advice on how to deal with this. And then we realized we're getting so many of these different indirect questions about this that it would be really nice to have a podcast episode. On how to deal with it. So just to give you guys kind of background information on what is diet hawk and why some people might find it triggering. So I found this definition that I really like from the company nourish Rx and they write that diet talk includes any conversation around restricting foods, slash food groups to lose weight or exercise for the sake of wanting to change our body weight shape or size. Diet talk isn't limited to diets in the most obvious sense, such as Whole30 keto paleo Atkins macro county. It is swirling around us even in the most mundane conversations. And so why is this problematic for some people? Well, as people start to embrace more of the intuitive eating and health at every size ideals when it comes to their well-being and how they're taking care of themselves. You know, it's easy to really get triggered by everyone else who's doing something completely different, right? They're on the Whole30 or they want to talk to you about keto or people are posting before and after pictures or family members. You know, you go to dinner and they're not eating any carbs at the meal. And so people find it really hard to know how to navigate this. So we thought it'd be great to talk about it on the podcast today. And you might be wondering, well, I don't understand the big deal. If somebody wants to do macro counting, to lose weight, why is that a problem? Well, one of the reasons, you know, if you look at some of the research with health at every size and intuitive eating, the idea is that up to 95% of people who try to lose weight on a diet are really not able to sustain that weight long term. And in fact, two thirds of those folks gain back even more weight. And so when people are really embracing intuitive eating and health at every size, they're also essentially saying goodbye to diets and hello to learning about how to take care of themselves by discovering their unique blueprint for wellness. So this can be, again, kind of triggering for them when they're hearing about all these DIA talks. So Wendy, I'm wondering, can you think of an example of when someone has started talking about their diet or their body negatively around you? Oh my God, girl, all the time, a gun because we're dieticians. I think it's just very normal because people think that we are the chosen person to talk. These things with. And yeah, I hate it. But yeah, last week I had a close friend who was here at my house and we were talking about lots of different things. But anyways, his friend was talking about how they feel self conscious about their weight. And I think they were just venting about not being happy about their body and it was one on one. So I think that in that case, I tend to have more energy to really dig deep into these things and have a dialog because when it's in a group setting, I just get very overwhelmed and I shut down and it's like, I don't want to be the person to kind of lead the conversation or whatever. But in this case, we really dove deep into these issues and kind of like the root of it and where it's coming from and talking about different insecurities and stuff. And it was a great conversation that I've had many times with this friend because this is stuff that takes time. And I'm sure that we'll have the conversation again. But specifically, they were talking about how it's manifesting in their relationship and their intimate relationship because they are self esteem has been impacted because of body changes, especially during COVID. Yeah, that's a really great point and it's something that's coming up a lot in the work that I do with my clients one on one in terms of people have gained some weight during coronavirus, you know. And that has had an impact on some of my clients, self esteem, and a lot of them are even more vulnerable to this diet talk because of it. One example that came up recently, you know, this idea of diet talk was, I don't know if you saw that Instagram Live that Jillian Michaels did. Wendy. Did you see it? I did not

Azor Antonette IG Janssen Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis Instagram DIA Wendy Jillian Michaels
A highlight from Ready to Get Naughty?

Sex With Emily

01:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Ready to Get Naughty?

"People have been asking me, so what's changed after 15 years of doing the podcast? Well, a lot has, but to be honest, the orgasm gap still remains a challenge for so many couples. You know what I'm talking about? Men tend to finish before their female partners. So you've heard me talk about promethean for years, so urologists developed FDA compliant delay spray can help men last up to 64% longer without loss of sensation, and because promession is quickly absorbed into the penis, it won't transfer to your partner. Oh, and speaking of your partner, I think we can all agree that sometimes women, even when alone still have challenges around reaching orgasm. So now, promession is created a new female arousal gel. I love it. It's a clitoral stimulant she can rub into her clitoris for grease pleasure and a lot more satisfaction during pretty much any sexual activity you can think of. So now, they got promes and delay space for ham, arousal gel for her, so basically they're closing the orgasm gap on both sides. Trust me, try this combo thank me later. Seriously, right into feedback at sex with Emily dot com and tell me how it went. I want to know. So try for message today. Go to sex with Emily dot com slash enhance. That's my site sex with Emily dot com slash EN HNC

FDA Emily
A highlight from Use This HOLIDAY Survival Guide to Make This Holiday Season the Best EVER! | Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:08 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Use This HOLIDAY Survival Guide to Make This Holiday Season the Best EVER! | Tom Bilyeu

"And loneliness and anxiety and depression and sadness. Everything that's just ick that goes along with that. I am a single mom. I'm an empty nester. And I don't have a lot of family. Most of my family is, most of my family is deceased. So this year feels harder and it feels heavier. That being said, anything that you can suggest that would help me avoid ending up in the fetal position, the entire holiday season. So I could truly focus on what matters most in life. Thanks Tom. Man, I wish we were together because I really want to know what matters most in life to you. So here's what I would do without knowing what that answer is because certainly if what matters most is family, then we want to map out how and when are we going to be able to spend time with the family that we do have. So whether that's your kids and traveling to them or having them travel to you and figuring out how many days there are going to be of that. But really mapping this stuff out. Now, let's take a really hard approach this. Let's make it like the just absolute Dire Straits issue. Let's say that every single friend that you have and every single family member that you have is unavailable and you're not going to be able to see them. All right, we're going to want to do a couple of things with our time to make sure that we're getting more energy than we're losing that we're doing things that are fun. We're doing things that fill us up. So some of that is going to be just what are the things that excite you, right? So for me, for instance, I have no problem watching movies by myself. So putting out a slate, this is what I would do. So one thing my wife has taught me is you can take an average Tuesday and make it special by doing certain things. So, for instance, when COVID first kicked off and we thought it was just gonna be a couple of weeks. We completely changed up our routine. And so normally, Monday through Friday, if I'm awake I'm either working or working out to make COVID special, we invited my sister over to my house, we played video games, starting at 5 o'clock. We were watching anime, it was really, really fun. And just by breaking out of our routine and doing something that was more enjoyable, it completely changed the dynamic. So if you're not able to hang out with people, but there are things that you like doing and you can break yourself out of your normal routine, for instance, I would if I were going to be alone, I would schedule out different Christmas movies that I wanted to watch and I would schedule them out in a way where I couldn't change them. Because then, what ends up happening is you're like, oh man, I can't wait till Tuesday or whatever when I get a watch this movie that I'm saving for myself for that day. So there's something about and I would leave some wiggle room. So I would let's say I had two things planned that I was gonna watch. When a scheduled one is not. Then, I would also, you have to find the things that make you happy. So I'm gonna give you the things that make me happy that I enjoy doing what I'm alone and use slot in whatever those things are that you like. And then we're going to get to the grand finale, which is the real thing that all of this is building up towards, which is like the guarantee thing that's gonna work. So bear with me if these easy ones you're like, nope, I'm still gonna be sad. I'm still gonna be lonely. None of these things are going to help. Trust me, I've got an ace up my sleeve. We're gonna get to it. Okay, so I would build out all of the things that I like doing. So for me, it's gonna be a Christmas movie every day. I love that the most. It's gonna be time playing video games. It's gonna be time reading, and then if you can't be physically with the people that you wanna see, and let's just I'm going to assume for now that you have a good relationship with a few people whether they're friends or family. And I would schedule out when they can a Zoom call. It makes a huge difference being able to see them. And if I really felt like it, I might try to reconnect if none of my current group is available. I might try to reconnect with a few people. I'm gonna obviously leave alone big days like Christmas Eve or Christmas or new year's. It's like, you know, you pick the random days in that period. And you make a game of it like how many people can I reconnect with how much joy can I send out, okay? And this is now starting to get into the secret a sub my sleeve, which is if you stop thinking about how can I get people to pour into me and you start asking how can I pour into other people, then you could be doing things like going on a Discord group and finding seeing people that you can connect with their you could go and this is like this is the ace of aces right here. Go find an organization, a charity organization that will connect you with people or animals. I see that you have a dog and doing something there where you can pour into people that really need it. Handing out toys to kids in need. Going into a shelter for homeless, going into a hospital and talking to people there, old folks homes. Oh my God, the number of people there that truly have nobody left in their life. Human connection is such a beautiful thing, and when you are serving other people, man, it seems like it would drain you but in reality, when you know that you're doing something for other people, you feel this deep sense of meaning and purpose. And so doing that around the holidays, I think could be a huge, huge, huge win. That there are other people. I promise that have it way worse than you that don't have any friends don't have any family left don't have any pets, don't be any animals. Don't have their own freedom, right? They're now living in an old folks home in this example or hospice. I mean, there are thousand ways that you could go and serve other people in a way that will bring you, I think a tremendous amount of joy. Now, it's also okay to mourn the loss of an old life like when you had the kids and they were young. So things like that, it's okay to spend some time with that. But you want to be very careful not to allow yourself to spend more than 20% of your time there. That means you're going to have to pattern interrupt, okay? So as you find yourself looping on the negative stuff, you have to interrupt it. You have to stop it. You can't allow yourself to think about those things. And I mean that literally, what's going to end up happening, I can promise you is you're going to start on that loop. And if you let yourself loop, then the negativity, then the depression, then the anxiety is just gonna keep coming and coming and coming. You have to pattern interrupt that stuff. You have to then fill that with something else. So it can be sitting down and doing a gratitude journal, it can be doing arts and crafts. It can be doing a puzzle. It can be whatever it is that ends up filling your cup, but you have to stop yourself from thinking those thoughts. Look, as somebody who dealt with crippling anxiety, I know this seems like I'm giving you some BS, oh, that's far too simplistic answer, but I'm telling you, I got to the point,

Depression TOM
Why airport security is so slow and how the TSA and airlines are trying to fix it

Savage Lovecast

00:59 sec | 2 weeks ago

Why airport security is so slow and how the TSA and airlines are trying to fix it

"The white man of the Minneapolis St. Paul international airport said that last week when he was getting arrested for threatening the life of a TSA agent at a security checkpoint. I don't know if this guy had a ticket and was supposed to fly that day or he just rolled into the airport looking for trouble, but he was unruly. He wasn't following the rules because freedom, which is just another word for rules or optional for white men. This guy was told to move away from the checkpoint by a TSA agent, but as he said it's a free country. And in a free country, men can do what they want and what this guy wanted to do at that moment was pick up a metal stanchion and swing it at the TSA agent's head. It didn't land, he missed, and he was arrested. Again, I don't know if this guy had a ticket to fly somewhere that day, but if he did, I'm really glad he showed us who he was before getting on an airplane. Because I don't want to read another story or see another

Minneapolis St. Paul Internati TSA
No Worries (MM #3906)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

No Worries (MM #3906)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Yes, they was talking about how Gen Z and millennials don't like to use the phrase. You're welcome. They prefer no problem or no worries. I've always used no worries when somebody apologizes for something. How do you acknowledge an apology? I find myself using the phrase no worries when somebody's apologizing for something. So they're more worried about your welcome being associated with being too formal, and I've always worried that when I use the phrase no worries, I wasn't being formal enough. I wasn't acknowledging an apology in the right way. How do you recognize an apology from someone? And of course, a lot of times, hey, I'm sorry I did this or I'm sorry I made this mistake and you just reply with no worries, or at least I do. And a lot of times, let's be honest, when you apologize for something, you know it's not your fault, but it's just easier to say, hey, sorry for the confusion. Sorry about the problem. Sorry, you're doing more work or whatever it is. And I'm just the conduit. No problem. No worries. Maybe I shouldn't be using them in terms of an apology or using them now instead of you're welcome. I know I'm just so confused.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Confusion
A highlight from Ep 205 Do You Want Recognition or Appreciation? ft. Dr. Paul White

Strong By Design Podcast

05:37 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Ep 205 Do You Want Recognition or Appreciation? ft. Dr. Paul White

"To another episode here on the strong by design podcast. You're hosted a coach Chris Wilson, so honored and excited to have a conversation today with doctor Paul white, a gentleman, I came to know a little while back at a first time conference that we attended in Orlando, a little bit up the road from where we are. I'm based here in Clearwater, Florida, where critical bench is based. So we love Orlando events because we can shoot right up there. And we got to hear doctor Paul white speaking about really his book and all the lessons from his book the 5 languages of appreciation in the workplace. And I took some notes. I have my notebook in front of me and there's some great information here I want to cover in this conversation today that I know will be a huge benefit to our listenership and I'd love to take a quick second to say thank you so much for being a listener of the strong by design podcast. We're over 200 episodes now in our fourth season. Things are going extremely well. And for us, it's not monetized. It's a ministry for us. We do so much in the world of fitness and health. And this is the one area of the business where we're able to really tackle other things that are so vital in life like leadership and coaching and relationships and culture and all these things. And faith, of course, which is part of all of that. And so doctor white is gracing us with his presence on the conversation today, but I want to give you a little bit of backstory about where he hails from and what he has been doing in the world. He's a psychologist. He's an author, a speaker and consultant who makes work relationships work, which is not an easy thing to do. He has written numerous articles for lots of different platforms, Bloomberg, Bloomberg's businessweek, CNN, fortune dot com, entrepreneur dot com. Fox business dot com, U.S. news and World Report to name just a few. He's the co author of three books, including the 5 languages of appreciation in the workplace are the basis for our conversation today that was co authored with doctor Gary Chapman, the author of the number one New York Times Best Seller, the 5 love languages. Which is Jesus sold well over a quarter million copies now, correct? So 20 million copies, yeah. Well, that one, in particular, even your book. Ours is sold 500,000. So yeah, the information I'm looking at, I know is outdated. He's helped create also a very cool online assessment tool called motivating by appreciation inventory, which has been taken by over a 100,000 employees and in their appreciation at work training. Resources. And it's going to colleges universities medical facilities, schools, organizations, government agencies and used in over 25 countries. So I'm just really honored to have you on the call today, doctor Paul. Thank you so much. My pleasure, Chris, thanks for inviting me. Yes. No, it's great. You started off your presentation last month by saying something that I had never really given much thought before, but it's so very true and it's a great distinction for people. Is that employee recognition doesn't equal authentic appreciation. Could you unpack that a little bit for our listeners, the difference between recognition and appreciation? Sure. You know, most people who've been in the work world some know about employee recognition for over 90% of the companies and organizations that exist have those. And it can be as small as sending out sort of an automatic email on your birthday or it can be pretty complex. But recognition really has been designed to help recognize and reward performance region goals and doing sort of above and beyond, which is a good thing. We want to support that. But we really believe that appreciation views the whole person. It's not just about performance, because first of all, in play recognition programs didn't only touch or reach the top ten or 15% in a group. You sort of hit the stars. Well, that leaves us big middle group 50 to 60% of people who are working hard, trying to do the best we can. We just don't hear anything. And that's a problem because one research station that 79% of the people who leave a job voluntarily sign a lack of appreciation as the reason that they're leaving. Most people think most managers think people leave for more money, but that's actually not the case. Leave when they feel like people don't really care about them or value them. And so authentic appreciation and we emphasize that because we don't want to just try to teach people how to look like they appreciate somebody we're not about that. But it's about valuing them as a person. And it can be for work related things performance. But we have other things that we bring that are valuable that are not necessarily related to the tasks of getting things done. Yeah, exactly right. I like that distinction as well as being authentic in not just being robotic or just doing it as a kind of need to do this.

Paul White Orlando Chris Wilson Bloomberg Clearwater Gary Chapman Businessweek Florida CNN FOX New York Times White U.S. Chris Paul
A highlight from How to Survive the Fitness Industry - with Bikini BodyBuilder Crissi Carvhalo | Nimai Delgado S3 EP11

Generation V

07:36 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How to Survive the Fitness Industry - with Bikini BodyBuilder Crissi Carvhalo | Nimai Delgado S3 EP11

"Coach, author and mother. She started in the fitness industry at the age of 16 and spent 12 years as a personal trainer teaching aerobics and competing in both sport aerobics and fitness model comps. In her mid 30s, she decided to make some radical changes in her personal lifestyle and decided to help educate others on the benefits of plant based eating. These days, Chrissy is still competing and actually one week away from her IFBB pro qualifying competition if she succeeds, which I'm sure she will. She will join a handful of others who have managed to accomplish such a difficult feat while being 100% plant based. It's good. Thank you for having me. Yeah, I'm super excited. I'm super excited to have you on. You and I have been in the similar space for quite some time. And we haven't ever met until last week. Yet in the gym. In the gym, of all places. I saw you stretching, and I was like, she looks familiar. And I was like, I don't know where I know her from. And then you walked up to me and we started chatting, and I was so glad that I've been envious of a few of you vegans training at gold. It's gold. We all know it's a Mecca, but it's somewhere that I grew up reading all the muscle fitness magazines. And some gym good vibe. Yeah. Yeah, there's no other place like it for sure. It's not one of a kind. And if you are someone who loves fitness and is been in the fitness industry, you know about gold. Exactly. Exactly. And you've been in the fitness industry for quite some time. Yeah, I started lifting weights at about 14 and was one of the first certified trainers a rope instructors in Australia at 16. Wow. So I'm 48 now. So it's a lot of years. Yeah. I've been in and out of the industry, but I've always tried. Yeah. So I did a little research based off your bio. Hopefully I got everything. Correct? Yeah. That was perfect. Okay, good, good, because you have quite a resume. Compared to most people, you have a very extensive. Children, so yeah, yeah. So how did that journey begin? What did you get into fitness at 16 or 14? I guess, body dysmorphia as a teenager. I remember doing yoga diets where I'd eat a big tub of yogurt, and that would be all I was allowed to have for the day. So, I mean, and that's going back in the 80s, so there was something that's always going to happen. Teenagers always going to feel like that about themselves. So I decided to put that into the into a healthier way of learning about nutrition and fitness back. And so I made that my lifestyle. My mother didn't really approve. She said, what sort of queries that for a 40 year old? And in fact, I become successful in my 40s. I didn't stop. I became successful vegan fitness model in my 40s. So yeah, I'm glad I didn't listen. Yeah. No, that's I think that's a common theme for many teenagers, especially when there is so much pressure around the beauty standards and the male gaze of what the expectations are of what a woman should look like or whatnot. That's beautiful. They are based off of what they look like. And we only had magazines and now it's a thousand times harder. We've social media. So yeah, it's definitely problematic, but we can always channel that. And who's something more positive, I think. Yeah, I think the more people that come out and just talk about it, honestly, that they've also struggled with it or had some degree of body dysmorphia eating disorder, just trouble with their own self image and even if they have a perceivably like a beautiful image compared to other people. Nobody knows what's going on in the inside and what struggles we're all experiencing individually. I think that brings more awareness to it. And more availability to talk about these types of things. Yes, yes. I agree. It's definitely something that's being on the other side now. Going through all of that, I guess now I'm on the other side where I like to be able to share my journey to be able to help. The youth create a better, not just a self image, but work on the inside. Because it really comes from the inside out, you can't make the outside look good if the insides falling apart. So, yeah. So how did that start for you? How did you begin working on the inside? Because I assume starting at 14 and then being a personal trainer, you probably stayed in shape throughout your entire life. I did. I had my children quite young, my first son, he's 26 now. I had at 21. And I guess for that time, I was still competing and coaching choreographing in aerobics and weight training. Looking good made me feel good. So I guess it wasn't as big a problem because that was second priority to my children, but I think I decided more so in my mid 30s, we've a cancer scare that I started looking at what I was putting into my body and that being able bodied was more important than being physically attractive, I guess, because I lost a really good friend at 38 to brain tumor and both of us were always, you know, on some sort of diet now 30s. And if we had an event, we'd go on a crash diet, exercise hard, just to look good for that particular event. And once we were self confident, it was still always a bad image. And so losing her at such a young age, I always then thought I don't want to dive beautiful. And so I want to leave. And so in her memory, I started researching about plant based nutrition. And detoxification and that led me to veganism. So once I think I opened my awareness of what I was putting into my body, I then realized that being vegan was something I was always an an animal lover that I was always going to innately be. But if I was going to be a vegan, I would be plant based. Because health was Paramount. For me, and I'm going down that road and realizing how amazing I could feel, because we all feel like our diet at the time, we feel amazing. But it's not until you change it you go. Wow, this is how good I feel now. And when you feel good, you look good. You perform better and then that got me. I'd been out of the fitness industry for maybe 9 ten years. And I felt so good that I thought imagine if I was doing this back when I used to be in the fitness industry and I competed as an omnivore in my 20s, I

Chrissy Mecca Australia Brain Tumor Cancer Paramount
No Problem (MM #3905)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

No Problem (MM #3905)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. I was reading a fascinating story the other day about how Generation Z and millennials don't like to say you're welcome. When they're thankful for something they usually prefer to say, no problem or no worries. Of course it has baby boomers all in a snit. I have not noticed it, yeah, I'm a baby boomer, but I haven't really noticed that before. Of course, it's all about being formal or not being formal. The world and the language have evolved over the course of time and we now live in a world less formal than previous. I remember the big deal when we first started wearing jeans to work, and everybody was so upset about that or go back even further than that when women started wearing pants to work. It's the world we live in now is much less formal and the younger generations prefer it that way. It all happens at an all evolves. But instead of saying, you're welcome, which is much too stuffy and much too formal and makes them uncomfortable. They'd rather say no problem and no worries. I'll be honest just an acknowledgment in general. That makes it okay for me because most of the times you say thank you. Nobody seems to care.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Mason
A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:41 min | Last week

A highlight from Health Disparities Cause More Health Issues (with Dr/ Howard)

"Think of us as your caregiver, best friend. When I learned that despite eating as healthy as possible, we can still have undernourished brains, I was frustrated. I also live in a farming community, so I'm aware that our food isn't grown as well as we need. Learning about neuro reserves relevant and how its formulated to fix this problem convinced me to give them a try. Now I know many of you are skeptical as was I. However, I know it's working because of one simple change. My sweet tooth is gone. I didn't expect that and it's not something other users have commented on, but here's some truth. My brain always wanted something sweet. Now, fruit usually did the trick, but not always. One bad night's sleep would fire up my sugar craving so much, they were almost impossible to ignore. You ever have your brain screaming for a donut? Well, for me, those days are gone. It's been about 6 months since I started taking the supplement and I have no regrets. I believe in my results so much that I'm passing on my 15% discount to you. Try it for two or three months and see if you have a miraculous sweet tooth cure, or maybe just better focus and clarity. It's definitely worth a try. Their link is in my show notes. The COVID pandemic didn't shine the brightest light on the consequences of our health disparities in this country. Well, I don't know what will. By favorite resident podcast neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard wanted to talk about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. I know why I don't like to go, but it is not the same at all. This is a very informative conversation, we started on the healthcare disparities, moved on to other topics and then came back to healthcare. I think you're going to find doctor Christopher Howard's insights, wonderful, informative, and I hope it gives us some enlightenment into other areas we need to focus on helping improve or just understanding so that all of us can get the best healthcare to allow us to age gracefully and as well as possible. Back with us today is our favorite neuropsychologist, doctor Christopher Howard, and we are going to be talking a little bit off of the normal topics today, but we're going to be talking about why African Americans don't like to go to the doctor. Hopefully we can make some suggestions on how to change that. So thanks for joining me again, Christopher. Absolutely. Thank you for having me. You're welcome. So I know why I don't like to go to the doctor 'cause it's just not real fun. You know, they weigh you, and then they tell you you're overweight and then, you know, and you're already don't feel good. That's my excuse. But you brought up this topic so why do African Americans not like to go to the doctor? Yeah. Well, once again, thank you for having me on your show. I think we always have great conversations. And you know, I should have seen symptoms like sometimes like when I go to the doctors like I always joke with the nurse or whoever is like putting into the background. It's like being the worst part is spending on the scale and finding how much you weigh. Because it's like no matter what you do, it's always like, you know, I can't make it go the other way. It's always going up. But, you know, this is an interesting topic because one of the things that it's like doing different pieces of the puzzle. Together so that we can understand what's going on. So one of the first pieces of puzzle that we can look at is we recognize health disparities. We look at we say African Americans over the age of 20, 44% of demand for each women has some very form of cardiovascular disease, African Americans have developed Alzheimer's that are two to three times white individuals. The birth complications during pregnancy African American women are three times as high compared to other groups of people, but then a society like, okay, well, all these disparities persist, then it should all be like us rushing down to get to but that's not necessarily the case. And a lot of times people talk about, well, tuskegee to the sticky. But I think that mister Sessions tuskegee and for the individuals who are underwear tuskegee essentially what happened for almost 70 years individuals had syphilis and rather than receiving care for simplest, they were just given a placebo because American government wanted to see what would that be like if syphilis remain untreated. And what it did was not only to create distrust with the medical system and the government or whatever the case might be. But it also substantiated beliefs that doctors are not good for people. And sometimes what we kind of are good for African Americans. And so sometimes which would kind of run into it's like availability heuristics, right? Where, okay, the neighbor down the street or remember the church or whomever they went to the doctor and it never came back right, right? So people started saying like, hey, you know, if you go to the doctor, you know, you're not going to come back normal stuff like that. So that's one of the things that kind of perpetuated this whole notion of not going to the doctors. But also sometimes what you can have to look at also is just like a certain communities, right? Because America is still segregated. And due to redlining. So I was reading the article most kind of interesting because what I was looking at was that the elf so before I go from another tanger, the red line is when individuals

Christopher Howard Alzheimer's Syphilis Christopher Cardiovascular Disease American Government America
Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Back in the 1970s, when ABC created Monday Night Football, with Howard Cosell and Don Meredith and Frank Gifford, it was all the rage it was revolutionary. It changed the game of professional football. I talked a couple of months ago where I thought the game of well, not just professional football, but sports broadcasting in general changed thanks to the new mega cast that ran most Mondays on ESPN2. That's Peyton Manning and his brother Eli, basically, while hosting a party, I guess you'd say, with guests popping in and out and kind of talking about the game, we're watching the game, but it's not really the play by play, and I kind of don't know what to do with myself tonight because they're not on. They're not on every game this season. They're not hosting every game, but I found that I watch more Monday Night Football now than I ever have in my entire life. And that includes years where I had to go host Monday Night Football parties when it worked in radio. It's changed the way I watch sports. And again, I've watched more Monday Night Football this year than I have in well forever. I think it's going to change a lot of things. It'd be interesting for me to see NASCAR kind of try the same thing.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Don Meredith Frank Gifford Howard Cosell Football Nasa ABC Peyton Manning Espn ELI Nascar
Chicken Tenders (MM #3903)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Chicken Tenders (MM #3903)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I don't know if we're at crisis level yet, but I just read where chicken tenders, or if you prefer chicken nuggets or chicken planks or whatever your kids are eating, the prices are going up, and they're going to be in short supply. Because of the ongoing problems with the pandemic and food processing and food preparation and people being employed, the chicken plants are one of the first and one of the longest lasting problem places in the American workforce. If you've got kids, I can't even imagine the panic that could be going through your house right now. After spending the weekend with my nieces and nephews and knowing how many chicken tenders they eat, I can't imagine the panic for some parents. I don't mind chicken tenders. I mean, I did the chicken nuggets thing or chicken McNuggets thing back in the day, and I enjoyed them for what they are, but they're not around the house. I don't really care. I don't know how it's the go to food for kids. For my wife, it's usually macaroni and cheese is the go to. For kids, now chicken tenders, chicken nuggets, and I wonder what my go to food was. Okay, everything was my go to food back in the day. But I can't imagine the pain and the panic people are feeling right now, because what are the kids going to

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nuggets Nasa
Lavender (MM #3902)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Lavender (MM #3902)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason, this time of year, the cold and flu season. You start seeing commercials for products that include lavender. Because lavender helps make you feel better. It's calming, it soothing. It has magical powers, I guess. I don't actually find that to be the case. I don't like the smell of lavender. In fact, I've got a couple of VapoRub containers that for some reason somebody gave me the head lavender in them, and I've tried to use it. I've tried to even put it on my feet when I wanted to soften my feet and get those vapor up juices coming up through my body and it works, but I just don't like the smell. Even on my feet, I would definitely not put it on my chest or put it on my face or anything like that. And I don't understand why lavender has these properties. Because any time I smell lavender, whether it's perfume, whether it's mother flowers themselves, or just anything that includes lavender, I'm not repulsed. I just don't enjoy it. I don't like it. It just it's not a smell for me. And maybe it's just a guy thing. Maybe it's just a me thing, but when you see the commercials about the soothing, calming, lavender baths, not so. It just kind of gets me agitated. And that's kind of

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Mason FLU Cold
The Wishbone (MM #3901)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

The Wishbone (MM #3901)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason if you have a big bird for the holidays, you likely have some kids fighting over the wishbone. They all want to break the wishbone. A growing up we had Turkey roles, a Turkey loaves, or Turkey breast, and didn't really have a big bird. Only a couple of times, so there wasn't much wishbone fighting in my family. But today I find all kids love the wishbone. And I wonder where they learn about the wishbone breaking tradition, if you will. I looked it up in the actual breaking of a wishbone goes back to chickens really in ancient Italy where people would pull apart chicken clavicles for good luck, because Romans believed that birds actually possessed divine powers, so they believed that keeping this particular bone would give them access to those powers. Supposedly, there is a way to be able to make sure you break it and always get the bigger piece, at least that's what I read somewhere. I don't know if it's true, I haven't broken a wishbone in years. Not something I thought about. But for some reason, a kid must learn really early on because they're always fighting over the wishbone, and that, I actually find kind of humorous. It wasn't something I ever cared about that much. Maybe because a couple of times I did win, it didn't necessarily good

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Turkey Italy