TV and Movies

Netflix and chill with the latest in TV and film, with news on the newest productions to interviews with blockbuster directors. Listen to audio about your favorite screentime shows here, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from 180: They Call Us Thankful 2022

They Call Us Bruce

05:36 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 180: They Call Us Thankful 2022

"Another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil U and I'm Jeff Yang. And it is just about Thanksgiving, at least by the time you hear this, it actually probably will be Thanksgiving and afterwards. So in honor of that, we are having our annual special Thanksgiving episode of, they call us Bruce. And this year we decided to celebrate it by having something like a friendsgiving, bringing over some of our fellow podcasts from the public podcast network. To join us just to kind of jam a little bit about the year that was, talk a little bit about the things we're thankful for, less thankful for and still puzzling over. And we would just love to do a roll call of our guests for this very special episode. So just everybody just give your name, the podcast you do, and a little bit about yourself, I guess. Okay, my name is Ada Singh. I am the co host of the podcast Saturday school, which is in the potluck podcast collective family. My co host is Brian who we basically talk about. Asian American films and we tried to direct people back to past films. And each season we have a different topic and we've recently completed our last season, which was on Asian American sci-fi films. And I'm also on the utility journalism team at the LA times, which last time I was here, we made fun of me a lot about. We kind of did. We kind of made fun of literally once journalism. Gave you a little bit of a hard time. That was funny. I didn't come up with the name, so I thought it was funny. But it's basically like service journalism, news you can use. It's really useful. Or karaoke. Karaoke tips. It's a broad spectrum. Well, we love it. And we love you, and thank you for joining us. Kim, how about yourself? Hi, I'm so excited. That you guys asked me to be here because I love they call us Bruce. So I'm honored. This is a big moment for me. I'm Kim Cooper. I am an actor and writer and improviser, and I co host to potluck podcast podcast. I co host Asians in baseball with Scott, who's also on today and our other co host Naomi koh, where we talk about Asian Asian native Hawaiian Pacific islanders in Major League Baseball and then I also co host Korean drama podcast with Steve Lim and Kathy Yamamoto, where the second generation of Korean drama podcasts we took over from Phil will and Joanna's legacy there. So they set us up really well for success over there. And you guys are great. Oh, thank you. I paid Bill to say that. Yeah, talking about nepo babies. That's us, you know? We love it. And we love Asians and baseball and Scott. Thank you for also joining your co host. One of your co hosts, I guess. I hear. But tell us a little about yourself too. Yeah, hey, really happy to be here. I'm Scott okamoto. And with Kim and Naomi, I do the Asians in baseball. I'm sort of the old man of the group. I pull out stats and history because I lived through most of the history and we have a good time because Kim and Naomi are kind of newer to baseball in the last like 5 years. And so they turned to me as the old guy who lived the oracle of baseball. Well, from like the 70s on. So yeah, I'm a writer too, and I have a book coming out next year called oh, you guys get the scoop. We just finalized the title of my book today. And it's called Asian American apostate. Oh. Nice. About me deciding I didn't believe in God anymore while I was teaching at a really crappy evangelical school. And how I found my way from that into this community. And in Asian American identity that didn't need religion. And I have a podcast outside of this network called chapel probation. So yeah, happy to be here. Damn, that's deep. Congratulations. Yeah, well, welcome. Congratulations and welcome both welcome everybody. As podcasters as friends, we thank all of you guys for joining us. And again, because this is like free form, I am drinking wine. I just had a very large meal somewhere. Did you bring enough for everyone? I would gladly share with you if I could pour it through the mic into your directly into your limitations. Your mouth holes. As it is. You know, we figured that this would be a great opportunity for us to just, you know, talk a little bit about what we do and share a little more of the sort of podcast love with the world. Because the stuff, the podcast you do are both unique and interesting and I think really complimentary actually with what we do on what they call us Bruce. But the lives you leave are also very interesting as well. And you know, I think each of you is doing something that feel in particular was like, let's get them on and talk about this thing. I believe

Asian America Phil U Jeff Yang Bruce Baseball Ada Singh Kim Cooper Naomi Koh Hawaiian Pacific Islanders Steve Lim Kathy Yamamoto KIM Scott Okamoto La Times Naomi Scott Brian Major League Joanna Phil
A highlight from #899: The Art of Adaptation with David Kajganich (Bones and All)

Filmspotting

01:20 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from #899: The Art of Adaptation with David Kajganich (Bones and All)

"What kind of a show you guys putting on here today? We're not interested in art? No. No, look, we're going to do this thing. We're going to have a conversation. From Chicago, this is film spotting. I'm Adam Kepner. I really think that one of the great gifts and opportunities of this career of filmmaking is to expand out through the lens of empathy, my view of everything in our view of everything and on its view of everything that screenwriter David kajan with an inspiring and optimistic perspective on his chosen profession. Is a regular collaborator with Luca guadagnino, including the director's latest, the cannibalism coming of age tale bones and all, which stars Timothée Chalamet and Taylor Russell. This week on the show, my interview with plus a conversation about some of the best book to film adaptations of the last few years. That and more, ahead on film spotting. Welcome to film spotting, I'm Adam campanar, Happy Thanksgiving week, everyone. Later in the show, some of the recent film adaptations were thankful for. But first, as we approach the end of the movie year, we wanted to make a request. You've heard us talk about the film spotting family and all the benefits that come with that membership. And if you haven't already signed up, we encourage you to check it out at film spotting family

Adam Kepner David Kajan Luca Guadagnino Timothée Chalamet Taylor Russell Adam Campanar Chicago
A highlight from The Steven Spielberg Rankings and The Fabelmans

The Big Picture

04:58 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from The Steven Spielberg Rankings and The Fabelmans

"And this is the big picture, a conversation show about Steven Spielberg. The man who is perhaps the world's greatest mainstream filmmaker has a new, and deeply personal film opening wide this holiday weekend. It's called the fable man's to celebrate we are breaking down the film that many consider a FrontRunner for best picture at this year's Oscars. We're also gonna rank all 35 of Steven Spielberg's feature films. Joining us to do so, returning to Spielberg, conversation, the great Joanna Robinson hi, Joe. I'm thrilled that I'm the big pig Spielberg go to what a prize placement for me. Amanda, how you doing? I'm really stressed because we did not discuss how we are going to do the ranking at all. We've done absolutely no prep. Maybe you both have done some mental prep. I guess I did a little bit, but then I got intimidated by the task. And so this is all going to happen on Mike, which both from a homework perspective and an emotional relationship health perspective. I'm a little nervous about. Yeah, we've set out with a big task here ranking the films of maybe the greatest director ever. 30 5 of them. I was re listening to the Sam Raimi ranking that you did, Sean. And I was like, okay, yeah, this is just sort of, it's feels. It's vibes. It's a lot of fun. Is how the group project goes. But I ranked my own list so that I have it to look at. But that's all I did. I think I did this. I'm certain I did this in 1987 and in 2004 and in 2011, just in my mind of what are my favorite Spielberg movies, but what you don't think about as much as 22 to 16, you know? There's a middle zone that I think it will be difficult for us. Nevertheless, let's talk about the fable mints first because this is a very big movie this year. I don't know if it's necessarily a hugely commercial film that we can talk about that. But I'll just give a little snapshot of the story for those who haven't heard of it. It follows a young man named Sammy who falls in love with movies after his parents take him to the cinema to see the greatest show on earth in the film opens quite beautifully with a young family experiencing the power of movies together. And soon armed with the camera, Sam, he starts to make his own films at home and his artistic mother and his engineer father observe and quarrel over the future of young Sammy and the future of their family together, and over the course of a decade we see as Sammy grows up, his family kind of fractures. And if you know anything about Steven Spielberg's family life and his personal history, this is closely resembles his story, story was co written by Tony Kushner, as we become a kind of aide de camp to the Spielberg mythology and the second half of the 21st century thus far. And I'm just going to start by saying I thought this was an absolute beautiful movie and I loved it. I don't have a ton of complicated nitpicking POV on it, but I'm excited to suck the two of you guys about it because I think we all love Spielberg and have strong affinity towards him. But this is a clearly the most autobiographical kind of plainly autobiographical thing that he's ever made. John, I'll start with you. What do you think of this I absolutely loved it. I sort of Spielberg Spielberg critics will hit him for sentimentality. That's where he gets hit a lot of the times, right? And I think to go into this movie, you need to just give yourself over to this is 70 something year old man. Processing his childhood. This is a COVID born project of sort of I'm at home. I don't have a lot to do Steven Spielberg like stay busy, so he decided to finally tell this story. And I think, you know, I'm unsurprised I'm excited to hear what Amanda has to say about this, but I'm really unsurprised Sean that you liked it because it makes us think of all these autobiographical films that we've been seeing from our great directors. You love licorice pizza last year. When I give myself over to something like this, which I did, the only critical brain subject that I want to apply to it is this question of who gets to who gets to make these stories and especially in a year where a film like bardo is being called self indulgently autobiographical. It's interesting to me to think about who gets to make these stories. But then if anyone gets to be self indulgent, I think it's Steven Spielberg towards the end of his career. I think that's an interesting line of thought for us to examine. Before we get into the worthiness of this as a movie, did you like this movie, Amanda? I fucking love being manipulated at the movies. Of course, it is sentimental as Joanna said, but way that I think is like a tribute to Spielberg's career and his abilities and also a little bit of a skeleton key for the rest of his sentimentality and his emotions. Joanna, I don't remember if you're in the child of divorce club and you don't need to share that, but you can be an honorary member for this podcast because we're going to get into it.

Steven Spielberg Spielberg Joanna Robinson Sammy Amanda Sam Raimi Oscars Sean Spielberg Spielberg Tony Kushner De Camp JOE Mike SAM Bardo John Joanna
A highlight from David Byrne - 'Everything Everywhere All at Once'

Awards Chatter

01:40 min | Last week

A highlight from David Byrne - 'Everything Everywhere All at Once'

"Everyone and thank you for tuning in to the 467th episode of The Hollywood Reporter's awards shatter podcast. I'm the host Scott feinberg. And my guest today is one of the most talented and influential singer songwriters of the last 50 years. And Oscar and Tony winner, he is also a 2019 lifetime achievement award, Grammy winner, and 2002 into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as part of the band for which he was principal songwriter, lead singer, and guitarist from its formation in 1975 through its breakup in 1991. Talking Heads, which is behind two selections on Rolling Stone's 2020 list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Number 364, more songs about buildings and food and number 39 remain in light, and two selections on Rolling Stone's 2021 list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. Number 123, this must be the place. Naive melody, and number 28, once in a lifetime. He has been described by The New York Times as, quote, an underground icon who danced across genres as if they were all part of one vast amplified stage, close quote, and someone who quote has spent his whole career blurring the distinction between pop culture and highbrow art. And Talking Heads have been called by the same publication, quote, the most consistently adventurous band to have emerged from rock's new wave of the mid 1970s, and a groundbreaking ensemble with a knack for hitching off kilter lyrics to postmodern beats. Also noting that they quote dissolve the barriers between disco and rock, conceptual art, and dance pop, close quote. While Time Magazine declared that they, quote, made music that

1975 1991 Scott Feinberg 2002 Two Selections 500 Greatest Albums Number 123 467Th Episode 2021 500 Greatest Songs 2020 Mid 1970S Number 364 Talking Heads Number 39 The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame ONE Grammy 2019 The Hollywood Reporter
A highlight from How to Direct a Movie, With Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

04:15 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Direct a Movie, With Sam Esmail

"Sean fantasy. I'm Amanda ovens. And this is the big picture a conversation show about movies and maybe TV and maybe some other stuff. Our old pal Sam esmail is here, hi. Hi, guys. Hi. How are you doing? I'm doing well. How are you guys doing? Splendid. This is our third try at this podcast. I now that we're actually recording, I feel a real sense of we should talk about. I was gonna make jokes about, you know, I hope that no personal disaster befalls anyone before Friday, but I was very nervous actually. Because the first time I walked in, I had I actually don't know what happened. So I just heard you split your head open. And I was like, it was like scanners all over the house. You're here now in the Spotify studio. It's lovely to see you. Thanks for coming. Thank you. Thank you. And Spotify has the rest of the office has that sort of industrial feel with exposed beams and or pulls. Very specifically. Very cool, yeah. And so as I T desk and we finally got my computer working after like a week of Internet nonsense. And as I was thanking the guys, I just walked straight into the pole. Oh God. And bounced off the plane. Oh, Jesus, man. And did you see this? Yeah. I saw the after effects. It was pretty grim. He was on concussion protocol, watch basically until my husband came to pick up. Blacked out. No, I didn't. I didn't knock out any consciousness. No, I didn't lose consciousness. And I was like, fine. Not on your skull though. Yeah, and because I hit my head, it was a very small cut. I did need stitches, but there was a lot of blood. So I was like all over the IT test. Literally wearing a white button down covered in blood. And it was like a horror movie sequence. It really was. Were you freaking out? When she texted me, we were in the office together and she texted me like, would you say I split my head open? Like something fairly dramatic. I said like I hit my head and I probably shouldn't do this podcast. So I raced to find out where she was. It was scary. Minutes before you showed up. Oh, so you didn't actually see her. I didn't see it happening. Just the lovely guys at the IT department, who were really nice about it. And then our friend Juliet was in town, and so in a moment of crisis, I called Juliet. So I just texted her under the table. Like, I'm bleeding. Please help. And she came and made sure everything was okay. My husband came and picked me up and drove my car home. And I was fine the next day. I podcasted about barbarian the next day. The very next day, congratulations. It really was okay. I had a tremendous black eye, which it was a good thing that there were multiple witnesses, even though it was humiliating. then I had to go to baby swim class with a very large black eye, so that was a tough beat. But otherwise, I'm totally fine. And the second time we tried to do this. I got COVID. Yeah. You just got. I just got COVID. That's the whole story. I went to New York. It was my first time getting COVID. I went to New York flew back. And you were fine. Actually, you did a pod while yeah. Yeah, 'cause I heard. Was I fine? I think I sounded like I was on my deathbed. No, you sound like, yeah, you definitely sounded like that. But you still got it out, you know? That's the kind of player I am. That's the kind of participant I am. Well, we're finally here. How are you doing? Are you well? I'm doing well. How is your 2021 2022 bid? It's the kid. The kid changes everything. You both have kids now. Yes, we do. It's all the cliches are true. A 100%. It's amazing. It's transformative. It's magical, blah, blah, blah, blah. But I do just love hanging out. I just love hanging out with her. I haven't shown her anything. I know you're showing herself. Now that she's more conscious, because she's about my daughter's name. Gonna be B 16 months. Yeah, mine's 17 months, but are you still showing her? Are you still playing barbarian in the background? No, no. That was the only one she was completely unaware. Maybe once every two weeks we'll watch something, maybe, but we're not really trying to avoid too much screen time. She has no interest. I tried to even throwing on bluey. She gets excited for about ten seconds, and then so she'll watch a few minutes of Louis, the one thing we watch that she sat through entirely in full was it's a great pumpkin Charlie Brown last week. 23 minutes. Really? Yeah, which I don't even know why. She's literally nuzzled up to my wife. And I don't know why she connected with it, but she did. And we're getting, we're in the phase of expressing affection.

Sean Fantasy Amanda Ovens Sam Esmail Juliet Spotify New York Charlie Brown Louis
A highlight from 179: They Call Us Bad Axe

They Call Us Bruce

04:30 min | Last week

A highlight from 179: They Call Us Bad Axe

"Wait. Potluck. Holy crap, you went through that? Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil you. And I'm Jeff Yang, particularly unfiltered today. On the road in less than ideal conditions, but still delighted to welcome our guest to this episode. A filmmaker, a documentarian, a guy who has spent a lot of time with his family. We're delighted to have with us today the director of the soon to be released, documentary bad axe, David sieve. David, thank you so much for joining us. Welcome. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you, Phil. Thank you for having me on the show today. It's so great. We love the documentary. It's going to be out in theaters and VOD very soon. People should watch it, but I feel like after watching it, I've spent some time a lot of time with your family. I feel like a lot of ways you invite viewers to be a part of this family, very intimately in some highs and lows of one of the darkest moments that we've all really experienced collectively. So it's an interesting way to kind of introduce people to your family and interject yourself into this situation. I mean, one of the things that really comes across in the beginning is that you started rolling the camera, maybe not necessarily because you're trying to make a movie, but because you knew that this was kind of a unique moment. And so you wanted to capture that. Am I right in that respect? No, that's a 100% right. I mean, you know, I think you get a sense in the film, like my role in the family is sort of being this documentary. And I've always loved photographing and filming my family and really bottling them up into these memories. And when I moved home during the pandemic, I had so much free time in the world, just like so many other people did. And, you know, this time in history was no different because it felt very interesting and here we all are living under one roof again and you know, as uncertain as it was, it was something I wanted to bottle up and capture and have these memories to hold on to of all of us being together, living together once again for the first time in quite some time. And that's you really how the project started, but even having said that, though, before the pandemic and moving home, I actually always knew I wanted to share my family's story. I mean, you know, if you look at what my parents did, a Mexican American woman, a Cambodian refugee who came here with just a shirt on his back and 1979 after surviving a genocide. I mean, these were two individuals against all odds decide to settle in this town called bad axe, Michigan, open up a business, and overcome so much adversity to turn that business not only into a success, but a center of what the community bad acts is. So that American Dream story was one I always wanted to share. I just didn't realize when I was picking up the camera and filming in 2020 that that story was unfolded itself in front of me in a ways I just never expected. I feel like we are almost in like a golden era of Southeast Asian self searching documentary. You know, I think of the donut king, I think of origin story. And I think of this film as almost like a trifecta that are circling around these traumatic incidents that occurred to another generation, but that we inherit that this generation inherits, often in the middle of its own trauma, right? And I love this film so much, but I also recognize that there's something very interesting about how meta it is, right? You are the documentarian. You are the document to a certain extent as well.

Asian America Jeff Yang David Sieve Phil Bruce Jeff David Michigan
A highlight from (Episode 348) "Yellowstone" Actor: Orli Gottesman.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:21 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 348) "Yellowstone" Actor: Orli Gottesman.

"I'm Orly goddess man and you are listening to Monday morning critic. I have to ask you, I've been dying to ask you this all day. How good is butterbeer? Oh my goodness. Oh my goodness. 100%. The frozen one's better than the regular. Have you ever had it? I haven't. So paint a picture like I'm trying in my mind to like picture what it tastes like and I can't do it. I can't figure it out. So think of like, so they have like a frozen one and like a regular one. It tastes like cream soda, but it also tastes like those caramel butterscotch like things in those golden. Okay. Like it's just like it's so yummy and it's got like this like cold foam on the top that's just like it just works. I was gonna say butterscotch, but like the way you're describing makes me want to have one right now. Yeah, that's a good description. So I have to say, you know, I don't know how you do it. I don't know how you almost have two lives. I was thinking about this today. It's almost like you're like Diana prince in one way, and another way you're like Wonder Woman, right? You have these like two lives. I mean, I can't imagine, you know, when I was your age, doing it. Is it difficult for you to pull off? Because we're going to get to it, but you have this amazing life that you're living that's very difficult. Not many people can do it. And then you're kind of at sometimes expected to be a high school kid, which you are, but is there a conflict? Is it tough? How is that journey for you? Yeah, there's definitely some struggle trying to balance, obviously, I wouldn't consider myself like a normal teenage girl, like for certain reasons, it's hard for me to kind of do the things that a normal teenager would do just because I don't have my mindsets completely different, just like based off of my priority is in this week it's like homecoming week and everyone's worried about getting their votes out and posting about all that stuff. And that stuff is just like over my head. I don't actually pay attention to it. And as much as I would love to, like I've always thought I'll never have the high school experience, you know? But it's like you take and you get and I'd much rather have what I have now. It's tricky trying to balance between my friends and my social life and being that teenage girl in relationships and, you know, having to leave for weeks at a time to go meet these amazing people and do amazing things and, you know, hopefully someday get big, but I'm living my dream and I'll make the sacrifices that I need to. Yeah, it's amazing because one day you're with Kevin Costner the next day you're a cypress Lake panther. Like I don't get how that and listen, for those listening and it's a tough thing to manage. I mean, but I love the fact that you're trying to give it a shot living that high school life living. Do you find that you're treated differently orally by people or is it one of those things where they know you, you've always been orally and they accept you no matter what or is it or is it a difficult transition to make? Yeah, I go to an art school so they acknowledge that you know I'm working and a lot of us have the same dream. For them it's usually more like theater like Broadway going to New York going to college and for me like I'm still at that moment where I'm like, do I want to go to college? Because what would I major in? You know, I could do something like producing. So but I mean, all of the people at that cypress Lake they knew me before they knew like Haley that I was Hailey on a show and so the super, super supportive, they don't really treat me any differently though, which I really appreciate. Yeah, excellent. I mean, and this is just the start for you because there's no way you don't go anywhere but up. I mean, you're off to such so many good things, I think. And it all starts with this two week camp in LA that you love. Was your sister with you at this camp? Yeah. Yeah, so outside of this, first of all, touching that two week camp and then tell me what else you love about acting, right? Because this camp was big for you. People are about to find out. But what else about acting do you really love or answer that in any order you want? I mean, I just love being able to be different people, but kind of like be myself in a way. It's kind of like, I get to step out of reality and do something that I've been practicing my whole life, but also for me and my sister sort of came really naturally. And all these huge opportunities, just like in my mind knowing that one day maybe I'll get to meet them and being able to work in their presence and also this is something that I was put into. I never realized that I loved the art of acting until a couple of years ago because I couldn't really appreciate it because I didn't know like the significance of it. And then I started talking to my friends and they all told me that they always wanted to be actors, but they never knew how to get started. And for me, that never occurred to me. If I weren't an actor, would I want to be an actor? You know, but it was like I was kind of put into this, but I'm so happy that I was because I now have all these opportunities like lined up and, you know, I can just pursue something that I didn't know that I loved until I knew that I loved it. Do you run lines with Ariel? Yes. Yeah, all the time. I hope it auditions. She helps me take auditions, yeah.

Cypress Lake Orly Diana Prince Kevin Costner Hailey Haley New York LA Ariel
A highlight from Mega Mailbag: She Said, Best Journalism Movies, and an Oscars Power Ranking

The Big Picture

05:47 min | Last week

A highlight from Mega Mailbag: She Said, Best Journalism Movies, and an Oscars Power Ranking

"I'm Sean fantasy. I'm Amanda dobbins. And this is the big picture a conversation show about the media mattering. She said a new installment in the long history of journalism films premieres this weekend, so Brian Curtis, one of the hosts of the press box podcast is here with us to dig into this new film, take some of your questions from the mailbag. We'll talk about the Oscars a whole bunch of other things. I was on the press box earlier this week to talk about our favorite media movies. Now you're here with us, Brian hi. It's great to see you. The media matters. That's what I'm here to say. It truly does. She said, that also matters. That's a new film. I'm really glad that you both are here because you guys have read this book. Brian, you have some intimate knowledge of some of the participants of this story. It's of course one of the most, I think meaningful media stories in a long, long time. It's of course the story of the two reporters at The New York Times, Jodi kantor and Megan tui, who reported on the sexual assault allegations and ultimately conviction of Harvey Weinstein, who is a widely known and very successful Hollywood producer and studio owner for a long long time. In this movie, really tracks closely how the story was reported and then told. So, she said, Amanda, I'll start with you. What'd you think of the film? This was my most anticipated film of the year. And had been from the beginning and even when we did, I think, fall movies. I put it at number one for two reasons. One, I really like journalism movies. And we'll talk more about that later in the podcast. But I like anything where it's two reporters who got it, get the story, you know? And are they going to get it or not? That to me is thrilling. And I also did, as you noted, read this book. And I thought it was a fantastic book. It is clearly in the model of all the president's men, the book, and we'll talk about how that influences the film as well. But I found it to be a really incisive and invigorating, just explanation of how investigative journalism works. I thought it was really interesting and instructive. It's not quite how to and there is narrative tension in it, they really are trying to hold your attention throughout the story of the book, which I appreciate as a person who likes a story, but just in terms of how to report these stories, how they reported this story, how to think about this type of journalism, I found it compelling and really smart. And so I was curious to see how they would adapt it and also just like the material and think it deserves a wider audience. Brian, what'd you think? Book was one of the best books about journalism I've ever read. I just remember it came out and it was literally me and my wife passing it back and forth because we couldn't wait to see what happened next even if we knew the answer would happen next. So I was excited to see the movie too. I think the movie was pretty successful. It was not to me a great, great, great journalism movie, but I really enjoyed it and enjoyed watching it and I thought it was interesting how they took this book that was very much in all the president's men style TikTok of this whole thing and reduced that down to a movie. Yeah, so it's directed by Marie Schrader adapted by Rebecca lankwitz. It stars Carey Mulligan as Megan tui and Zoe Kazan as Jody Cantor. And it's a fascinating document of sort of real-life recitation. There are a lot of real-life aspects that are blended into this movie in ways that I have not yet seen before, which is of course very notable because in many ways this is also not just the New York journalism story. It's a Hollywood story. It's a story about famous people and people that we know in the real world. And so it's interesting that I thought the movie was really, really good on the thing you just cited, which is some of the practical aspects of doing this work. I don't know if it's note perfect in terms of showing how you do an investigative reported feature, but it's very hard to make a rendition of that that is interesting to watch. And some of that is great. I think there is a, I don't want to say it's a flaw, but an inherent struggle with the story, which is that we just do know where we're going the whole time. There's not a ton of surprise if you read the newspaper. And so whether or not this is ultimately like a proper movie is something I wanted to ask you both about because the work that Meghan and Jody did obviously is tremendously important. And the performances in this film are good and the filmmaking is good. And I liked watching it. Or is this something different? What respectfully you also know where all the president's men is going? That is true. And I think that this movie models itself a lot has a lot of influence on all the president's men and also exists somewhat in the shadow of all of the president's men, which is not really fair because all the president's men is the greatest journalism. Movie in one of my favorite movies of all time. And I haven't listened yet. Is your episode of the press box out yet? It'll be out tomorrow. So I haven't listened yet, but I have to assume that all the president's men is like no spoilers, but it's going to be up there because I know the two of you. Number 78 on my list. Okay, well, that's not true. Anyway, so you're right that you know how it's going to end, but that doesn't necessarily disqualify it. I think for me, I guess I never really gave my verdict. I really liked this movie. I didn't think that it was perfect. And I think it just lags a little bit. They are so dedicated to not only showing you how journalism works, but also to making sure that they respect each of the sources who went on the record for this piece, which and for this book, which is a commendable action and one thing that I really like about the book is that it kind of gives you a new way to think about how this sort of journalism works. But it just takes a long time. It just takes a long time, so it's not that you know that, you know, at the ending is, it's just that you know what the ending is and it also asks you to wait for it for like 45 minutes, whereas in all the president's men, you just get a bunch of newspaper stories like typed on a typewriter in like 30 seconds at the end and it's like nix it out, you know?

Megan Tui Sean Fantasy Amanda Dobbins Brian Curtis Brian Hi Jodi Kantor Harvey Weinstein Brian Marie Schrader Rebecca Lankwitz Zoe Kazan Jody Cantor Oscars Hollywood New York Journalism The New York Times Amanda Carey Mulligan Meghan Jody
A highlight from #898: Glass Onion / Wakanda Forever / She Said / Nanny

Filmspotting

06:34 min | Last week

A highlight from #898: Glass Onion / Wakanda Forever / She Said / Nanny

"Kind of a show you guys putting on here today? We're not interested in art? No. No, look, we're going to do this thing. We're going to have a conversation. From Chicago, this is film spotting. I'm Josh Larsen, and I'm Adam kemar. Welcome gang. We got a great weekend. Who's that? Benoit blanc, the detective? Mister prom, my Canada overstate my gratitude to be here. When's the murder mystery start? When does the murder mystery start? Well, that kind of depends actually, maybe November, may be December, Josh. That's from the trailer for rian Johnson's glass onion, a knives out mystery, which yes, does have a limited Thanksgiving week theatrical run before coming to Netflix in time for Christmas. This week on the show, a spoiler free review of glass onion, plus thoughts on Black Panther, Wakanda forever. She said, and a couple of golden brick recommendations. That and more, ahead on film spotting. Welcome to film spotting. It's our final show together, Josh before the Thanksgiving holiday. We'll take a little break, but we will have some new film spotting content for you. And we've got a lot to get to this week. Many movies, big and small, to recommend, and to talk about why don't we jump right in with the one that we actually just came from? Can we call this a still processing review of glass onion? We've had a couple of hours, so maybe not quite as quick of a turnaround as we sometimes do on late Tuesday nights. But yeah, let's just say I'm thankful it's not going to be spoiler because I don't have to answer if I figured everything out yet. We can just talk about other stuff. There you go. Benoit blanc is back that's Daniel Craig as the world's greatest detective. None of the other characters from the first knives out reappear in this film, new ensemble, new setting that setting is a Greek island, the home of a billionaire played by Edward Norton. He has gathered together some of his friends for a fun filled murder mystery weekend. Those friends include characters played by Kate Hudson, Dave Bautista, Catherine Hahn, and Leslie Odom junior. Speaking of spoilers, I don't think it's hard to talk about whodunits generally without getting into spoilers. I do think it's hard to talk about whodunits without getting into spoilers when the twists and turns actually have some teeth to them because the movie has something more on its mind than just entertainment. Is that the case for you here with glass onion? I mean, I was out certainly did, right? There were political overtones and undertones in that film. And I largely appreciated that approach by rian Johnson. Maybe a couple of, I remember talking about a couple of the conversations that were directly political in that movie. I felt like we're with you. We get it. We don't need the characters to talk about this. Maybe things are a little more subtle here, maybe not. I'll be interested to see how people respond. You're right to maybe give our political reading of this movie. We would have to give too much away. So it might be something we have to save. I'll just say, I think there's meat like that on the bones here as well. And it's interesting. If you were to say off the top, did you read largely the Edward Norton character, this, let me look at his name again because it's pretty great. Miles drawn. Miles Braun. Did you read him maybe not as a one to one, but a pretty close to an Elon Musk. Maybe that's just where we are right now. You have to. You have to. He's Elon Musk or he's Peter Thiel or what's the difference he's an amalgam of both or many others. Yeah, and I'm sure when this was conceived, perhaps he was just like, you know, 10% of what Ryan Johnson was thinking about right now with the state of Twitter, Musk is at the forefront of our minds and so he stood out to me and that is amusing and pointed at the same time, which I think is a good way to describe glass onion. It's also a good way to describe knives out, right? It can work on these multiple channels, these multiple frequencies at the same, depending on what you're bringing to the movie, what you're looking for in a movie like this and what you want to kind of dig into to take away from it. So did you find that to be the case as well? Yeah, I think we had a very similar reaction. We were both chuckling at a lot of the same moments and lines as we saw this movie together. And yeah, whether it's steel or Musk or someone else, it doesn't really matter. Rian Johnson must have been watching everything that's been unfolding on Twitter and in the media over the past two to three weeks leading up to audiences finally seeing his movie just shaking his head into life. And probably a little depressed too. But there had to be a little bit of delight. Glass onion is so cleverly and distressingly prescient. Some of its timeliness is serendipity, the larger share is a smart writer and director who understands that the roots of these sad farces are as old as our country, at least. And this is where I'll get into some of the political talk, but do it in a glancing way, which I think you have to do with this movie. We said it has some teeth to it. That isn't a surprise. If you've seen knives out, but I don't think it's a surprise if you've seen any of rian Johnson's other films, whether they're political or not. He's a filmmaker who has proven that he's not going to devote himself to a project. Even if it's a sequel, or it's part of our franchise, just for a paycheck or just because someone's giving him a big budget to play around with. He is going to be invested. And he's going to have a point of view. And again, that doesn't necessarily mean a political point of view, though it can, and it certainly does in ways that in both knives out movies, I'd say are relatively subtle. And maybe more so here, even though it arguably encompasses even more of the story. You mentioned it in the first movie, there were some political jokes. They were pointed, and they were more pointed than anything we get here, more explicit, but they were jokes. Now, there was a larger commentary at play in that film, too, right, on a class. And of other races and ethnicities. I don't think

Benoit Blanc Rian Johnson Josh Larsen Adam Kemar Edward Norton Josh Dave Bautista Catherine Hahn Leslie Odom Miles Braun Daniel Craig Greek Island Netflix Kate Hudson Chicago Peter Thiel Elon Musk Canada Ryan Johnson
A highlight from (Episode 347) "The Fablemans" Actor: Judd Hirsch.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:18 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 347) "The Fablemans" Actor: Judd Hirsch.

"I could. But there was a dybbuk somewhere in the just kept on knocking at my heart and saying, you will not be happy. And if you don't do something with people, you will not be happy. And it's hard to make that decision, right, judge, because you're going from something that in a career like acting, which is very unstable to a job that is very stable, you know, somebody you're clearly very bright to grand physics. So that takes a lot of hope, but it make that to make that decision. Well, it's just when you become the aviator and you know you can fly the damn plane and you'll be able to do some great things with this airplane that you jump out of it. And wonder where you're going to land. Yeah, and you know what, I did want to wish you a belated happy Veterans Day and thank you for your service. My father was in the army so I can absolutely respect and be grateful to anybody that does serve. So thank you for that. Oh, you're welcome. You're welcome. I left my way through. It was fine. So I do want to luckily I was either too young for one war and too old for the other. And that's a good spot to be absolutely. But somehow we're always at war. I did want to touch upon a few of your works before we get to this wonderful resistance 1942 movie that I saw great movie. You know, what do you think I was reading something in IMDb today, which is funny to me because I wonder who put some of these entries in because anybody can enter things. And it says that many of your characters are cranky and ill tempered. I find that your characters are filled with depth and heart. So it's like weird how people can see your characters. Like, I think your characters and I can name ten movies off the top of my head where the character has heart and depth and love to it. So that's the trouble with social media. When it comes to a matter of taste. They just don't have it. I mean, hey, listen, if you ever got described by that many people, you know, there's only one or two is really going to know what the hell they're talking about. The other ones just blabbing. Yeah. And I think they meant to be described by that. You kind of say to yourself, who is it that describing me? I mean, you could say that about any actor, you could say about Al Pacino, like I just think it's weird how people see things. And I don't think they meant it as an insult. I think it was a compliment, but I don't think he was very reflective of how the range that you possess. It's like somebody trying to find an adjective. Yes. Not knowing English well enough. Yeah. Hey, listen. Language is very imperfect. The people who can use more language perfect at least an image, which is closer to what the language can describe. There's no language that really can tell you how you feel and how you can express it. You'll have to just do more and more and more. That's why adjectives are there. That's how I remember the expression from inside to outside can only come from a language. I mean, and it's so imperfect. I'll tell you what I found out. When I went to school and I was going to study very technical stuff called engineering is called math and physics, okay? That's what I that's what I studied. Math was the beginning. Math was the thing that got me interested into. What is possible. And how you get there. It's almost like something giving you a telescope now and I don't look into. The universe. I'll be fascinated by how to get there. I'd be fascinated by anything I didn't know. Math is a perfect language. Can I you can not describe the number one in any other way. Yeah, there is. There is no, there's no gray area. There's no. Supreme Court of numbers to tell you what it really means. But the rest of it is language. And luckily, we get a chance to express artfully through language. Yeah. Well said you guys, these guys wrote a wonderful script and the rest as your imagination. And what the camera can do. Yeah. For sure. And a lot of the people that was to the podcast were very excited that we were going to be speaking. So I said a few questions before we hop into resistance 1942. You were terrific and Independence Day. Why does that movie work so well? Judd.

Al Pacino Army Supreme Court Of Numbers Judd
A highlight from Johnnys Not Giving Up on Love

Click Bait with Bachelor Nation

03:39 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Johnnys Not Giving Up on Love

"Hello, everyone. Welcome back to another episode of clickbait. I can't wait to get into everything. We got the bachelor nation breakdown. We're going to break down the finale. Tia is going on maternity leave. We'll talk about that. And then our very special guest, this man is involved in the most drama that I've seen in a while. Johnny is here. We're going to ask him all the burning questions. We can't wait to talk to him. But before we do, hello, how's everyone doing? Hello. Hi, honey. I did not talk to, aren't you? We're a little nasally today. A little bit. And I have been for a while. I was like messing with my allergies when I was away. It's also the way it's also the change of weather. I'm nasally, too. Yeah, you're the last week too. For our little mouths, I'm sorry, guys. Lunch. Once November hits, I'm like sick till March. I don't even leave home. I don't even know how I'm getting sick. Like, I go to the grocery store and just happens. Or walking outside. I'm about to have a baby too. Maybe it's a song. That he's coming early. You think so? I hope so. I really hope so. Okay, yo, can we guess David? When the baby's gonna be due. And then what should we bet if whoever's closest? We can bet dinner. And I'm gonna say, I'm gonna say, so the babies do December 27th. 23rd. Okay, the babies do decide. The babies do December 23rd. I believe that he will be coming into the world on December 25th. Joe. What? No. Okay, Christmas. That's what he said. That's what he said. December 25th, that's what he said. Okay. I am going to say that the baby is going to be due 23rd, 2016 because before that, I'm going to say December 15th. Okay. That's like a nice round even number. Okay, I like it. December 15th. You know what? You can't change it. I'm not changing it. I'm not sure. Okay. But I think that I actually, I think Natasha may be right. Whoever says I think so. I think so too. So technically my doctor said she would let me be induced at 39 weeks, which is the 16th, so I can totally see me actually going into labor on the 15th. And just bypassing the whole induction, it's just like the movies where my water breaks at the store and it's just like a mess. And then we rush to the hospital. I can see it. Yes. I wouldn't imagine any other way. It has to be a dramatic entry into it has to be dramatic. It has to be an embarrassing and everything else. I'm going to be the person my water breaks. I'm going to be like, listen, I've got to wash my hair really quick because I don't want it to be dirty. We can wait a little bit. Over this last year, I've had so many friends get engaged and start planning their weddings and it's such an exciting time, but I've also heard how stressful it

TIA Johnny David JOE Natasha
A highlight from Dahmer with Robyn Maharaj

Based On a True Story

05:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Dahmer with Robyn Maharaj

"At the Netflix original series that most people simply call Dahmer or the full official title Dahmer. Monster, the Jeffrey Dahmer story. As the title suggests, the ten episode miniseries from creators Ian Brennan and Ryan Murphy tell us the story of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, who murdered 17 people between 1978 and 1991. It's probably obvious, but just to clarify, we will be talking about murder, cannibalism and all sorts of horrific things that Jeffrey Dahmer did in this episode. And I know that can be triggering for some people, so if you'd rather not listen to this episode, no worries, I'll catch you in the next one. To help us separate fact from fiction in the series, I'm excited to be joined by Robin maharaj, a freelance writer and author of the book called grilling Dahmer. The interrogation of the Milwaukee cannibal. Robin's book was written with detective Patrick Kennedy, who was the one locked in an interrogation room with Dahmer as the killer explained how he did the horrible things that he did. Sadly, detective Kennedy passed away in 2013, but it was Robin who turned his notes into the book. Before we bring Robin online, let's set up our game. Two truths and a lie. If you're new to the show, here's how it works. I'm about to say three things, two of them are true, and that means one of them is an all out lie. Are you ready? Okay, here they are. Number one, unlike what we see in the series, they did perform an autopsy on Jeffrey Dahmer's brain. Number two Jeffrey Dahmer killed a bunch of animals before he killed any people. Number three although his nickname was the Milwaukee cannibal, not all of Jeffrey Dahmer's victims were killed in Milwaukee. Got him? Okay, now as you're listening to our story today, your challenge is to find the two facts scattered somewhere three episode and by a simple process of elimination, you'll know which one is a lie. And of course, we'll do a recap at the end of the episode to see how well you did. All right, now it's time to connect with Robin maharaj about the historical accuracy of Dahmer. series kicks off by showing how Jeffrey Dahmer was caught in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the year 1991. And according to the first episode, Dahmer picks up a man named Tracy Edwards at a bar. They go back to his place where Dahmer ends up pulling a knife after Tracy starts to notice some red flags going off and then he sees as an opportunity to escape Tracy that is. And he manages to make his way out of Dahmer's apartment, runs into a police car. He tracks down the two cops. And then they return to Dahmer's apartment with Tracy Edwards there. And while doing a search of Dahmer's apartment, they find photographs of dismembered bodies, I think, one of the cops is like, wait a minute, this is real. Yeah. How well did the series do showing how Jeffrey Dahmer was ultimately arrested? Well, you know, I think it's just an exact moment that is made for cinema. Like you can kind of imagine it. Like how I sort of see it is sort of depends on where you pick it up. And escaping and kind of getting out in the hallway, getting outside, and then flagging down these cops or is it just him flagging down the tops. But wherever it is you start, and I think that the series did it beautifully. You know, it's very much, you know, him talking to the cops. I just want these handcuffs off. I don't want to cause a lot of trouble. I just want to be able to get on with it. And it was just sort of the chance of them looking at it and saying, well, we don't have a key. We need to get the guy who has the key to get these unlocked. And they had to really improve. They had to really kind of talk him into coming back with them because he said, this guy is crazy. And you know, I don't want to go back there. It smells bad. Understandably, so absolutely. So that scene of them sort of just standing there outside of the apartment with Tracy kind of behind them. And you know, he's sort of looking away and not really wanting to make eye contact with Dahmer Dahmer standing there and he's been drinking a lot. So he's really kind of unbalanced and suddenly he's opened the door to these two uniform police officers. I think they handled it beautifully. I think they just did it. And as I said, it's a moment made for cinema. There's just a lot going on there. And everything that you can just picture it happening and it really, I think it really was perfectly done in terms of how it really occurred. They're saying to him, you know, this guy just wants his handcuffs on and let his command will just we won't take much of your time. But as soon as they walk through that threshold is really when the drama story unfolds. Yeah, yeah. The first thing that caught my attention was that he went back with them. I was like, why would they take him back? I mean, I know they kind of mentioned it briefly in the series talking about the key, but it sounds like that was what they really were after was the key to unlock it. Yeah. You got to wonder why didn't they just leave them in the car? And then they go up and say, well, you know, you handcuffed it. But anyways, they brought them up there. And maybe they just thought, you know, we'll just deal with this right at the door and then kind of everyone can get on with their lives again. But yeah, they walk through that door and of course they notice that sense right away. That smell and I think a lot of police officers say, once you've smelled it, you never forget it. And but yeah, at first, they're just kind of like this is kind of a strange guy, kind of a strange place, but they do see these photographs. And I remember the detective in real life saying, you know, or thinking to himself, like, where did this guy get pictures from the morgue?

Jeffrey Dahmer Dahmer Robin Maharaj Milwaukee Tracy Edwards Ian Brennan Robin Grilling Dahmer Tracy Ryan Murphy Patrick Kennedy Netflix Kennedy Dahmer Dahmer Wisconsin
A highlight from Jessenia on her Paradise Journey

Click Bait with Bachelor Nation

03:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Jessenia on her Paradise Journey

"Hello, everyone. Welcome back to another episode of clickbait. We have some bachelor nation breakdowns, Gabby breaks her silence and dance with the stars and talk a little bit about that. We're gonna break down the episode and then we have a special guest coming on, just senia, you may know her from, you know her from Matt James this season. She was on bachelor in Paradise last season. She is also on the current season, but she just went home due to her breakup. I think it was a breakup with Andrew. Breakup ish, yeah. So we'll get into all that. But before we do, what's new with everyone? If anything's new, really. Did anyone try to get Taylor Swift tickets? 'cause I heard about the Taylor Swift ticket fiasco. And I guess because everybody went on her site at once. It was a disaster to do that. Why would I try to do that? Look, there are. I just have to say this. It became a game. Did you get them? Did you get the tickets? No, I never got them. Honestly, I just feel, you know, this is just my personal opinion. If you are over 30, you gotta let the girl you have to let this dig young swifties, get the tickets. You've seen Taylor before. Have you seen her before? I love you. And it was amazing. Same video and everything. Same thing on everything. And it was late August. It was hot as hell. And we had the best time. You gotta let the young swifties get there, get their fix. She's gonna have another one. But she hit her grandma era and now we're back in the lack of moody or I don't know. She's like, she's staying my age. She's like, I'm gonna have a father adult at that point. I'm gonna need an eye out. And I could be the damn ticket, and there's three dates here. That is perfect. That's like perfect for your night out too. Yeah, it's the weekend of Cinco de Mayo, get out of here. Get the tickets, so what are you gonna do? I didn't get a single ticket, maybe I can stand outside the stadium. I don't know. Now I'm gonna try again today. There's like a few pre cells I wanna try again. I just need y'all to go. Yeah, now you should try. Y'all gotta lift it. Y'all got to let the young swifties get their tickets in. I hope all the young swifties 'cause they was on it. Oh, I even had a preso code. You had to be selected to be part of the verified cell event and so many people were my DMs, like at least you got a code. I'm like, bitch, I didn't get tickets though. So it doesn't matter. I heard people were sitting in the waiting room for all the Internet waiting room for like three hours. Oh, three. Joe, three is nothing. I logged in it. Ten. And finally got in to even look at the tickets at about 5 p.m.. Wow. Wow. And like every time you would click one, it would be gone. Wow. Wedding weekends are so freaking fun. Getting together with old friends that you haven't seen in a long time, everyone coming together, seeing all the anxiety and inks good anxiety. That is. From the bride and the groom and everyone around, everyone's so happy everyone's so excited to see love happen. And when you're getting married, it's not just about the big day. It's about all those amazing days leading up to around and after that big day. In Zelda is here for all of it. Like the day you find your dream venue or the day you're invites start landing in people's homes or of course when that wedding website finally goes live after all of your hard work, Zola has a team of experts and advisers who are on call and ready to help you through the ups and the downs of wedding planning, you also have access to a wonderful community, a thousands of engaged couples who are going through exactly what you're going through from getting engaged to getting married, Zola is here for all

Matt James Taylor Swift Gabby Paradise Andrew Taylor JOE Zelda Zola
A highlight from The 1997 Movie Draft

The Big Picture

07:37 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from The 1997 Movie Draft

"Hey everyone, it's Kevin O'Connor. AKA Kevin Obama AKA Kevin O concert, Kevin. Wait a minute, you're not Christopher. No, Kevin, sadly, I'm not as cherubic or as raspy as verno, but it is I, Jay Kyle Mann, and folks. Basketball has been and continues to be so very good. That's exactly why Kyle and I are hosting a brand new basketball show on a brand new podcast feed. The ringers NBA draft show. We're gonna have you covered every week as we go in depth and deep dive in hopes of answering an ever important question in the NBA. Who's got next? Whether it's an international phenom, like Victor Wen bana, or the G league scoot Henderson, or stars from overtime elite like aim and Thompson, as well as a full blown swarm of talented prospects from the promising 2023 NBA draft class. For sure, Kyle and we're also gonna get into players from the college ranks, 'cause this is a loaded class for us to discuss prospects rising and falling, and we're gonna revisit and redraft recent draft classes and get into how the leagues evolution could help inform what's valuable in a prospect of the future. This is a podcast for a fan of every team whether you're losing and have high draft lottery odds or you're looking for sleepers later in the draft. We're gonna be covering everything in the months that comes, so please make sure you follow and subscribe to the ringer NBA draft show. And hit us with those 5 star ratings. This episode is brought to you by carvana. Carvana is in the business of driving you happy. That's why they have thousands of car options for under $20,000. So you're bound to find the right car that fits your budget all online. Sounds like some pretty good odds. With all those thousands of cars to choose from, the only thing you won't find at carvana are surprise bogus fees. So visit carvana dot com or download the app to shop for a vehicle. Carvana, they'll drive you happy. From hits like NCIS and ghosts to halo in the Star Trek franchise. Survivor and the challenge. To paw patrol and SpongeBob SquarePants, paramount makes some of the world's most popular entertainment. And thanks to the international expansion of paramount plus and Pluto TV. Paramount streams popular content to everyone everywhere. To find out more, visit paramount dot com. I'm Sean fantasy. I'm Amanda dobbins. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about 19 97. We are drafting again, it's the movie draft 1997 edition. Chris Ryan is here in the studio. You made it CR. Thanks for having me. This was threatened by you made it by secretaries of state across America. No, save that for just my opinion, episode 384. What I'm referring to in 1776, man. Oh my God. No, I'm referring to your busy schedule. You're busy guy. Yeah, I'm busy, but you're busy, Amanda's busy. Their children among us, not here, like really, but you guys have had children. Interesting point, should the next draft feature Alice and Knox is a good question. What do I get to have then? Well, you could you've got John fetterman. Do you want me to draft against Alex and Knox? No. But also, you have burgeoning relationships with them. So you could almost turn our children against us. That's true. Yeah. That's your kids too. Both of your kids, their eyes get wide when I walk in the rooms too. Do you guys remember the political atmosphere of 1997? No. Who was president back then? 'cause I still Clinton. It was Bill Clinton. Yes. It's quite toxic. But it was like, oh, is white water, right? Yeah, sure. That was a better time. You could just tune in and tune out, you know what I'm saying? Timothy Leary style. And you personally can't do that right now. I'm too deep. What about you? Have you been ensconced in our political? No, I have to be honest, I sort of, I turned it off. I mean, I catch straight jokes from the two of you. And my own personal JML at home in the form of my husband. I have correspondent for you guys. No, I know what's up, but at some point, I'm not tuning in to MSNBC in any of its forms, you know? I respect it completely. I think the listeners of this show are also not doing. So they're here for a draft. So let's just go right to 1997. Would you say this is a crown jewel draft that you have been waiting to do for a long time? No, I hadn't identified it a long time ago, but then when I started looking at the films that are on this list, I was like, why did it take so long to get to this one? Formative year. Pretty critical year, I think, for all of us. Sure. And certainly for a lot of our favorite directors. So it's exciting. It's a good one. Amanda, what were you up to? What were you doing in 1997? I turned 13 years old. Okay. And this is the year that I learned about the Oscars. Now that I learned about them, but that I became really invested in them. And that has a lot to do with the fact that Matt Damon and Ben Affleck were a part of the Oscars campaign tour. I'm not joking. I know. I taped that Oprah special on VHS. I know I've told this story before, but I remember being really, really charmed by them, and also curious about, but also invested in that Oscar race. Now, obviously this is also the year of Titanic, which is a really big deal at the Oscars at the box office, but also if you were a 13 year old girl. And so the thing to do if you were 13 and you had seen Romeo baz luhrmann Romeo and Juliet was to be obsessed with Leonardo DiCaprio. And to buy a lot of those books, you know, about that were like 40 page teen beat by atrophy is that they sold, I guess, a Barnes and noble. I wrote a few of those. My friend Katie still has a tremendous collection of those that we should maybe I should interview her about. So if you were 13 and you were Leo fan, then you had to go see Titanic like a thousand times in theaters, like my peers were the people contributing to its box office. History. And this was the year that Amanda decided, she's zagged, and I was a good will hunting person in a Titanic world. And I was a Matt Damon person in a Leonardo DiCaprio world. Was it zero sum? Did your goodwill hunting fandom diminish your appreciation for Titanic or were you like, that's okay, but I love this. It did diminish it. I became self aware enough or the Amanda project started to the extent that I was like, nah. Was this the first pop culture? Yes, I was like, that's for the normies, and I'm over here with good will hunting. I'm Matt Damon. And this is a better movie, and this is more interesting. And this is like, I am distinguishing myself as of this type of fan, as opposed to that type of thing, because keep in mind I was also 13. So there was like a crucial moment. Yeah, a level of allegiance. And so I didn't actually see Titanic for a while, and then I had a friend who was like, listen, you just got to come with me to the movies to see Titanic. It was like her fourth time. To this person? No, but I went. And I was like, okay, it's pretty good. It's pretty good. Am I resisted it? I think so. I mean, I cry at movies. I'm willing to be emotionally manipulated at movies. I don't get mad about it. And my heart is open. Not Chris, though. Not great. I let it happen. When's the last time you cried in theater? Oh, I don't know about in a theater because it's been a while since I've seen anything that I felt like emotionally devastating, I guess, in that way. Lady bird. Yeah. It's like 5 years ago, but sure. Sure. Yeah. Did

Carvana NBA Kevin Obama Kevin O Verno Jay Kyle Mann Victor Wen Bana Kyle Halo In The Star Trek Franchis Kevin Sean Fantasy Amanda Dobbins Basketball Kevin O'connor Paramount John Fetterman Amanda Knox
A highlight from Emma Thompson - 'Good Luck to You, Leo Grande'

Awards Chatter

04:49 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Emma Thompson - 'Good Luck to You, Leo Grande'

"Smart wool merino base layers are so comfortable. They're the first thing you'll want to put on and the last thing you'll want to take off. No matter where you're at or where you're going. Because feeling good is the best way to keep you doing you. Smart world base layers, the most essential versatile and comfortable clothing for anything. Anywhere. Shop base layers or find a local retailer at smart wool dot com. Smart wolf go far, feel good. Hi everyone and thank you for tuning in to the 466th episode of The Hollywood Reporter's awards chatter podcast. I'm the host Scott feinberg, and my guest today is a British actress and screenwriter who is the only person who has ever won Academy Awards for both acting and writing. In addition to those two Oscars, the former for 1990 twos Howard's end and the latter for 1995 cents and sensibility, she has also won three Bafta Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, one Emmy Award, and one critic's choice award, with her other credits, including 1990 threes the remains of the day and in the name of the father, 1990 8s primary colors, 2003s love actually, and for TV, the limited series angels in America, 2004s Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban, 2006s stranger than fiction, 2007s Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, 2009s and education, 2013s saving mister banks, 2017s the meyerowitz stories, 2019s late night, and this year's good luck to you, Leo grant. All of which might explain why the 2018 citation in which Queen Elizabeth II made her a dame describes her as, quote, one of Britain's most versatile and celebrated actresses. Why Vanity Fair has said she, quote, redefined our image of female stardom close quote, why interview has called her, quote, the rarest of cinematic talents, close quote, and why the observers Mark kermode once said, quote, she's up there with the great. I mean really great. British female performers. I'm talking, of course, about Emma Thompson. Over the course of our conversation, which Thompson recorded from her London home after being honored at a luncheon by the UK Critics' Circle, the oldest association of critics in the world, for her services to the arts, and at which she gave a speech about the impact of film critics, the 63 year old and I discussed the origins of her pursuit of acting and of her deep and passionate feminism. The peaks and valleys of a long career as a woman in the business, why in Sophie Hyde's good luck to you, Leo grin, she agreed to play a retired school teacher who was recently widowed and hires a sex worker to help her finally experience an orgasm, plus much more. And so without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Emma, thank you so much for joining us on the podcast. Great to have you. And on this podcast, we always begin truly at the very beginning and always ask where our guest was born and raised with their folks did for a living. I know that in your case, it sort of was in the genes, right? It sort of was in the genes. I was born to parents who were what my dad used to call jobbing actors, they had come from respectively quite interesting homes. Nothing to do with the arts, moms was sort of more clergy and it was Scottish and I suppose you would call it middle class, although Scotland's not the same really in our class system. So they were not well, they didn't have much money. And her mother was one of 7 children. A fascinating background, actually. 5 girls all had red hair and who all went off to Australia because they were going to immigrate. And on the journey, which was in 1915, on a big ocean liner, every single one of the girls got telegrams saying that their fiance had died in the First World War. So extraordinary kind of to think, you know, how close that background, how close that history is to our family. And my father, born in rural England in Surrey, to a very poor family, my grandmother, who was a scullery maid, she'd left school at 13, and at the interesting part of her story was that she went to work with a childless couple who lived on the coast, and when the zeppelins came over during the First World War, the wife would leave, and the husband

Scott Feinberg Bafta Awards Leo Grant Harry Potter Oldest Association Of Critics The Hollywood Reporter Golden Globe Awards Emmy Award Academy Awards Sophie Hyde Leo Grin Oscars Mark Kermode Queen Elizabeth Ii Emma Thompson Howard Phoenix Britain Thompson
A highlight from Black Panther: Wakanda Forever Is Here!

The Big Picture

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Black Panther: Wakanda Forever Is Here!

"I'm always ready for podcast. Okay. Arguably the most anticipated movie of the year. Coogler's back, his co writer Robert Joe Robert Cole is back for the film. Of course, tragically Chadwick Boseman is not back for this film and so that's one of the major challenges of this story. First reactions, band, what'd you think? Couldn't believe they did it. Couldn't believe that they did it. Went to the movie with not anticipation. With fear. With fear of, I've been very open about this about the reality that I thought the character of T'Challa should have been recast. The reasons why I felt that should have happened. I have fear. I had fear, not that the movie wouldn't be good. I thought that that was, you have a lot of capable creatives. They were going to make a good movie that people liked. I had fear of having to say goodbye to chat with Boseman again. I did not want to say goodbye to chat again. I said goodbye, chat once. Out of nowhere. Hurt. Very painful. And the movie had to do that. There was no way around it. So to have a film where we get swept up in this gigantic sort of struggle between these two countries, these two civilizations, these two different sort of perspectives, is one thing. But doing that while having to remind everyone that we lost our hero, he's gone. And that he is almost in the movie more because he's not in the movie because every single scene you're thinking, what would Chad do? What was T'Challa doing? What would this do? And that's I'm not trying to be unfair to everybody else. I was scared, but I left the movie fulfilled. You know? So it was tough. You know? Yeah, I'm sorry to say that for me what you identified as working as exactly what did not work for me. This actually was a pretty disappointing movie for me. And I had the opposite of what you had in that fear. I had anticipation, not necessarily for the same reasons, but I love Ryan coogler's movies, and I think black the first Black Panther is a pretty major accomplishment inside the structure of a marvel movie. And the whole time I was watching the movie, I felt that there was a Chadwick Boseman shaped hole in the movie, specifically because not necessarily just because I missed him as a performer or missed that character, though I did feel that way. But more because it felt like the movie was constantly and we know this from behind the scenes reporting contorting itself to get to the finish line without him and without that character. And you could feel it in the structure. There's a lot of story and a lot of characters in this story, and the thing that you just identified, man. I think it's really well handled at the beginning of the movie and really well handled at the end of the movie. And there are these like hammerhead bookends on the storytelling that really work. And then in the middle, there's a lot of stuff. Amanda, what was your reaction to it? Yeah, this movie has to do a million things, but to everything band was saying three, very difficult things at the same time, which is one emotionally and just say goodbye to Chadwick Boseman, say goodbye to T'Challa, acknowledge the real world, and also what that means for the story. Then it's got a solve for that absence both within the story and within the movie itself. And then it also has to be a part of the MCU phase four. And that is just a lot to ask of any movie. And I thought that part one as Sean said, the beginning and the very end was really moving. And then two and three didn't really work for me. Van is looking for something on his on his shelf. Yeah.

Chadwick Boseman Coogler Robert Joe Robert Cole Boseman Ryan Coogler Black The First Black Panther Amanda Sean VAN
A highlight from 178: They Call Us Maulik Pancholy

They Call Us Bruce

04:23 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 178: They Call Us Maulik Pancholy

"But there's also this other issue, which is puberty. Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil you. And I'm Jeff Yang, and I am so delighted on this day of great relief for many of us. The day after election day, to welcome back actually into our studio, one of our favorite folks, friend of ours, from the podcast, and terrific actor writer, organizer. Author of two at this point, great middle grade books, the most recent of which is what we're gonna talk about today. Malik pancholy, welcome back to they call us Bruce and thank you for nickel out loud. What a great book. Welcome. Thank you. Oh my gosh, it's so nice to be here. It's so good to know that the listeners are listening, but it's nice to see your faces on our little camera set up here too. It's good to see you guys. And thank you for having me on. I love chatting with you both. We love chatting with you as well. And it is especially great that you've decided to break out the full studio equipment for us. You sound fantastic. Rather ironic that you are in a closet right now. I'm sure he's never heard that joke before. It's like all the time. But it never gets old though. But very, very relevant to this book, obviously. Which I should say, I started reading even though it's short and lovely because of horrible travel related issues. But Phil Reddit and we've talked about it. Yeah, I've read it. And it's like Jeff alluded to. It's actually interesting that we're talking about it on this day. The day after elections because there's so much stuff in the air in the culture, that kind of comes out in the book that is related to a lot of the stuff that we've been talking about in terms of culture wars and what people are allowed to be and not be and not read and I know that some of the origins of your book actually stem from that as well from of this book stem from your experience with your first book. So maybe first, you can talk about Nikhil out loud the book itself. What's it about? And maybe you could talk about where it comes from for you. Yeah, yeah, for sure. Thank you for reading the first three pages, Jeff. I really appreciate it. I listened to the first weeks on audio. No, I'm happy to tell you guys about it. So I'll just do the elevator pitch of Nikhil out loud, but it's about a 13 year old kid who's the star voice on a hit animated series called Raj ready in outer space. He loves playing this character of Raj every week, Raj goes into the galaxy and solves the universe's problems in 22 minutes and three commercial breaks. And the truth is that Nick hill, the character is in a lot of ways more comfortable, disappearing into the sound booth and hiding behind this character than he is in the real world. But his family has to move to Ohio to take care of his sick grandfather, which means meeting grandparents who doesn't really know that well, going to a brand new school, making new friends. Even though he is comfortably out, it means coming out to a whole new set of people and that leads to some trouble in the town. Because he's 13, his voice is changing, which means the future of the cartoon is somewhat unknown for him, and he's got to find the power in his own voice to stand up for the things that he believes in. And to your question, Phil about or to your thoughts about it being so timely. I started writing this book in 2020 during the pandemic. And it was very much based on an experience that happened to me in 2019 on book tour for my first book. For the best at it, where I went to visit a middle school, which is part of the book tour often for middle grade books. And I went to this incredible school in Ohio, 700 kids in the auditorium. It was the entire 6th grade, 7th grade, and 8th grade. And when I told them that the book, my first book, the best at it, is about a 12 year old Indian American kid who's just beginning to figure out that he might be gay.

Asian America Jeff Yang Malik Pancholy Bruce Phil Reddit RAJ Nikhil Phil Jeff Nick Hill Ohio
A highlight from #897: Top 5 Father-Daughter Duos / Aftersun / Weird

Filmspotting

01:09 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from #897: Top 5 Father-Daughter Duos / Aftersun / Weird

"What kind of a show you guys putting on here today? We're not interested in art? No. No, look, we're going to do this thing. We're going to have a conversation. From Chicago, this is film spotting. I'm Adam kempner. And I'm Josh Larsen. You know what a compromise is? Been in the law? No. It's an agreement reached by mutual consent. It is way it works. You can see the necessity of going to school. We'll keep right on reading the same every night. Just as we always have. We both have daughters, Josh, safe to say that Atticus Finch was the movie dad we set out to be. I don't think I'm allowed to say that after my sacred cow review of To Kill a Mockingbird. So I'm just gonna go with how about I go with Tracy Lutz in lady bird, a much easier bar to clear there for sure. This week on the show, we've got our top 5 father daughter duos. Plus a review of the new heart wrenching father daughter film after sun, which opens in limited release this weekend. That and more, let's go buy a big bag of Doritos and eat them in the car.

Adam Kempner Josh Larsen Atticus Finch Tracy Lutz Chicago Josh SUN
A highlight from "Pig" Film Composer: Philip Klein.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:36 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from "Pig" Film Composer: Philip Klein.

"My name is Philip Klein and you're listening to the Monday morning critic. So I have to say going through your filmography is pretty amazing because first before I go into any further could you explain explain to me I know what it is but what's an orchestrator? Is that somebody that conducts the orchestra? Is that somebody that assembles the orchestra? I mean, I'm coming from a point of like, I mean, I know what it is. I have a feel for what it is, but what are the exact duties of an orchestrator? Yeah, I mean, it's a question I get asked a lot. I guess so what an orchestrator does this works in conjunction with a composer to basically take what they've written? Because everything nowadays is digital. We work on computers for everything. So it's the process of taking it from digital form and making it analog, so to speak. So we take all these blips and blops on your screen and turn them into notes on a page. And what we do is assign all the individual parts or the instruments, make creative some creative decisions about voicings and we're there to basically take what a composer has done formalize it in the most elegant way possible. Some composers write very bare bones, cues, that goes to an orchestrator, so you're doing a lot more creative thinking and filling in. Other composers are very complete and it usually comes down if there's time and all honesty. If they have the time to invest into that process, they usually can get through it. But you know, I've done things with composers where they're writing a whole score in three weeks, so they really rely on their orchestrators to help them fill out all the parts and get things ready and whatnot. But yeah, we're kind of the next step after the composer writes it. And then we orchestrated it onto a big score, get it ready for the orchestra, and then it goes off to copyists, and they extract all those individual parts and put the sheet music out on the stands for the players. Yeah, that makes sense. And so the next question is, can somebody who's an orchestrator or somebody who's composing music right an entire score and not get credit for it. So like just pretend here. Let's say I'm Hans Zimmer and there's a score for I'll just say, I don't know, inception, okay? Can somebody have put together most of that and Hans and I'm not saying this happened? And Hans Zimmer gets all the credit. Are there situations where there are people behind the scene that do a lot of the heavy lifting and maybe aren't recognized as much as they should be? Yeah, I mean, I'm being honest. But I will say, I mean, if you're speaking, let's say, from a Hans Zimmer hypothetical. Hans is pretty good about more of what you're describing is called ghost writing. Which is a pretty common term through all creative forms. And I've done a lot of that too. I think a lot of what you'll see on my IMDb credits say additional arrangements or additional whatever. Music, whatever. And that usually what that is is the big main composer, and then there's a bunch of helpers underneath that he's giving creative he or she they them. They're giving creative direction to all the workers underneath. And then, you know, they're going off and writing cues. And a lot of times, again, it's a time thing. Maybe a composer just doesn't have time to write a whole score because it's a replacement score, or he's coming, they're coming in very late in the game. Orchestration, you know, it's kind of hard these days to say that orchestrators ever write a queue for a composer. definitely worked on scores where we all we get is a piano sketch. And it's very bare bones. We hear nothing mocked up that's orchestral. But what needs to come out of that piano sketch is a full orchestral score. So you could make an argument that maybe we're writing some there, but it's more of an arrangement than it is a writing. And I think ghost writing is basically a bunch of composers working under a main composer. So by the time what I say these days, it's hard to get away with letting an orchestra to do that much is because film productions, directors, producers, executives want to hear a mock up of those cues. And so it's very hard to sell them on just a piano, you know, rumbling under something and be like, well, yeah, you know, think about French horns be here in the trombones will be there in the violence will be up there. And I don't blame them. If you're not a musician, how would you ever hear that? You know, you can't. You can't envision that. So it's very hard to kind of get that through a pipeline and modern filmmaking, so generally orchestrators are still getting some kind of foundational mock up of orchestral instruments in some form. It can be very bare bones, but they're generally there because the composer has to get that approved. Right before it gets to recording. So I mean, you touched on ghost writing, which is definitely a thing. And I've done plenty of it. But it was a separate process to the orchestration. Gotcha. Gotcha. And you know, as you're speaking, I'm thinking like, even on final products with final scores, you see many composers now that so like I'm thinking of like Top Gun: Maverick, there's a few people on that for giving credit for each for each track, which is, which is unique and as we're talking about Hans Zimmer I'm thinking about that, Dunkirk is too.

Hans Zimmer Philip Klein Hans
A highlight from The 2022 Movie Star Ranking: 35 Under 35, Revisited

The Big Picture

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from The 2022 Movie Star Ranking: 35 Under 35, Revisited

"Than 20 months ago we embarked on our first ever movie star ranking, it was a widely celebrated and confirmed in the port to be 100% accurate, a year later we revised our list in light of the release of Dear Evan Hansen, the less said about that, the better, last week we saw the streaming release of two under 35 star led vehicles, the first Harry Styles is my policeman is available on Amazon Prime, and Jennifer Lawrence's causeway is on Apple TV plus, so we're running it back. Who's up? Who's down? Who's aged out and who's hitting the scene hard? I'm really aged out Amanda. I'm not eligible for this list, like by a long shot. Yeah. It's tough. I never made the cut. I feel further and further away from it every year because I am. I want to remind everyone that I would have been eligible for the first list, where I'm a movie star. Oh, yeah. That's wonderful. I guess that's true. That's right. You were not as kind about this at the time. It's like, what about me? And you know what it was. It was because you had to be under 35, and I believe I was 35 at the time of recording. So I was kind of advocating for my peers. And you denied my peers and also me a spot on the list. But I was thinking about how I think the true measure of a movie star, at least for this list. Is when I Google someone's age and I'm just like, holy shit, I did not realize you were that young. And because there is something larger than life about their presence or that kind of transcends their just general 23 year old Ness. I don't mean to dismiss 23 year olds either. Bobby, or however old Bobby is, Bobby, you're doing great. Thanks for you. Yeah. I'm no longer 23. I am 26. Which is very different than 23. Very, very different. So were you 23 when we started doing this exercise? Maybe 24. Yeah, I think I was 24 still. But I was 22 when I started producing the podcast, so that's soaking. That is absolutely brain worms for me. Yeah, that's what I said. I will say doing this exercise again and kind of going through the list. And making a long list of all the new and exciting young movie stars. And frankly, there are a lot. This feels a lot less grim than it did a couple of years ago to me. I did have a little bit of that feeling of like grandpa heading down to the meat market. You know, like it was a little like, this is kind of gross that I'm doing this. I want to have fun with it, but I don't want to be too objectifying or weird about this because I'm like, I'm 40. I got a kid. This is just a game we're playing. We're just having fun with this. It was the first time I was like, is this a bad idea? Is this not what I should be doing? I want to remind everyone that this is a thing that we made up during the pandemic. We were in our houses in the kitchen, in my case, just making stuff up and you and I brought our personal rigor and list making sensibilities to it, but it was also totally made up. And I don't think it was received that way. People thought that we were being serious. And then somehow we have become more serious about it. We made another one last year that was kind of in conversation with the first one and in conversation with our level of seriousness. And then afterwards, Rachel zegler, she of west side story, and also every upcoming Disney movie that you've ever heard of, tweeted it out seriously, or maybe not, seriously. No, I don't know. I'm on your listening great news. You made this year's list. And it was not just because you tweeted about it. And thank you when we wish you well, and I thought you were very good in west side story, by the way. We did not set any bear traps for social media active stars, though. I just want to say that that is not how we know a lot of places when they do stuff like this frequently will be like, well, this person's very active on IG and they're definitely going to see this. So we're going to tag them so that they retweet it or whatever. We did not do that. It is now somewhere between Joe and Sirius. I think there were a couple of times when we were negotiating the list where I was like, this is wrong and we will go to court if we don't get this right. And then there are other times where I was like, it's funny that we made this person number 13. So, you know, take it as it comes. Yes. There are moments of personal flair on this. And I also just to pull back the curtain, the way this gets done is that Shawn and I just kind of make a list and look at people's ages on Wikipedia. And then over the course of a weekend, just leave increasingly hostile Google dot com to each other and it's a real tag you're it in that I text Shaun being like, okay, it's your turn and then Sean writes back like, okay, it's your turn.

Evan Hansen Bobby Harry Styles Jennifer Lawrence Amanda Amazon Rachel Zegler Apple Google Disney JOE Shawn Shaun Sean
A highlight from Jerry Bruckheimer - 'Top Gun: Maverick'

Awards Chatter

04:31 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Jerry Bruckheimer - 'Top Gun: Maverick'

"Hi everyone and thank you for tuning in to the 465th episode of The Hollywood Reporter's awards chatter podcast. I'm the host Scott feinberg and my guest today is a producer of film and television who is one of the more fascinating and to some degree polarizing figures in Hollywood and has been for decades. The Guardian has written quote to those of tender sensibilities he is the devil incarnate, the man who helped destroy the movies and an architect of our cultural stupid, but to those who sit in Hollywood's counting houses, he's a man with his finger, plates at squarely on the movie going audiences, collective clitoris. He is money, close quote. Indeed, Playboy called him the most successful producer in history. Variety submitted that he is the only man in the business today to become famous strictly as a producer, and The New York Times said he could well be the most influential producer working today. And with credits including the following films to say nothing of his many hits on TV, it's hard to argue. Flashdance, Beverly Hills cop, Top Gun, bad boys, The Rock, Armageddon, Pearl Harbor, Black Hawk down, the Pirates of the Caribbean and national treasure franchises, and most recently, a sequel 36 years in the making. One of the first movies since the outbreak of COVID to bring people of all ages back to movie theaters in large numbers, Top Gun, maverick, which, 6 months after its release, is still playing in theaters, is 2022s highest grossing film by far with nearly $1.5 billion taken in at box offices around the world. Has received rave reviews. It's at 96% on Rotten Tomatoes and might well Garner a first ever Oscar nomination in the category of best picture for my guest. Jerry Bruckheimer. Over the course of our conversation at his Santa Monica office, the 79 year old and I discussed how advertising led him to producing. His roller coaster partnership from 1982 through 1995 on high concept films with the late Don Simpson a pair of The New York Times called the top producers of the 1980s and the Los Angeles Times described as the kings of commercial cinema, making movies in which style was substance and audiences left the theater buzzing from adrenaline rushes. What led him to bet when others wouldn't on directors like Paul Schrader, Michael Mann and Michael Bay, and on stars, including Johnny Depp, Nicolas Cage, and Tom Cruise, plus much more. And so without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Jerry, thank you so much for doing the podcast. Great to have you on this one. We begin right at the very beginning. Can you share for our listeners where you were born and raised in what your folks differently? I was born in Detroit, Michigan. My dad was a salesman. My mom was a housewife. And I'm first generation, both my parents came in the 30s from Germany to avoid the war. And it was a pretty humble upbringing, right? I mean, from what I could gather reading, there were not a lot of money lying around. That's for sure. Yeah. I could stretch my arms out. It both walls and my bedroom. Really? Yeah. Only child, what were your, I guess, a big thing, it sounds like that happened pretty early on that maybe has shaped everything since in a way. You have a generous uncle. Is that fair to say? Yeah, I had a number a couple of them. And one of them had a gift for you. Yeah, camera. He gave me a camera. And I was about 6 or 7 years old and we have pictures of me with that camera hanging around my neck when I was very young. So I started taking photographs right away. And was that something that you thought as time went by, you could do something with beyond a hobby, or when you go off to college, your major was psychology, right? That's right. That's right. So in a minor in algebra and sociology, how far away can you get? Just the education and the confidence it gives you by going to college. You feel you can take anything on. Yeah. So at the time you graduated, what did you think you were going to do with the rest of your life? And it never clue, not a clue. I applied to some advertising agencies when I got back to Detroit. And ended up in a mailroom for an advertising agency called McManus John and Adams in those days.

Scott Feinberg Hollywood The Hollywood Reporter The New York Times Don Simpson Black Hawk Playboy Top Gun Jerry Bruckheimer Beverly Hills Paul Schrader Garner Caribbean Michael Mann Santa Monica Michael Bay Nicolas Cage Oscar
A highlight from The Banshees of Inisherin and Top 5 Movie Friendships

The Big Picture

05:43 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from The Banshees of Inisherin and Top 5 Movie Friendships

"I'm Sean fantasy. I'm Amanda dobbins. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about the fucking Irish. On today's show, we will be diving into Martin mcdonagh's new film the banshees of his Sharon, a reunion of Brendan Gleeson and Colin Farrell from McDonough's 2008 cult classic in Bruges. We'll also be sharing our top 5 movie friendships on the show. After that, McDonald will join me for a chat about his new film very exciting to talk to him. I hope you'll stick around for that. First, our dear friend CR Chris Ryan is back hi, Chris. Are you coming down the pump at 2 p.m.? Chris, you're a huge fan of Martin mcdonagh. Sure. You got some Irish blood? Fuck yeah. Amanda, you don't have any Irish blood. I don't think so. Okay. You don't think so? You're not sure. Well, you know, it all gets, there's been some genealogy, but I'm not like you. I don't have like 23 and me. Let's bring in Henry Louis Gates, junior. Sir? Can you examine our DNA? I'm really excited to talk about this movie. This is one of my favorite movies of the year. I love Martin McDonald's movie is rough sketch of this movie, set on a remote island off the coast of Ireland, podrick is devastated when his buddy calm suddenly puts an end to their lifelong friendship with help from his sister and a troubled young islander, Patrick sets out to repair the damaged relationship by any means necessary. However, as calms resolve on the strengthens, he soon delivers an ultimatum that leads to shocking consequences, Chris, what'd you think of the banshees of in a Sharon? I loved it. Probably my favorite movie of the year. Non Top Gun maverick department. I don't think that I've seen a film that sort of took me on the roller coaster of all possible emotional reactions. You can have to something where it's just so delighted and laughing at this Coen brothers esque kind of romp in the beginning and then honestly in pieces at the end of the movie. Just absolutely shattered. I mean, what'd you think? Oh, I thought it was fantastic. I do feel a little bit like I'm imposing on a conversation between the two of you about a movie about the two of you and your friendship in a lot of ways. You know, I was like, so I see myself as more like a mediator role. I'm a siobhan. And siobhan is very intentionally in the movie. There's a place for me. No, I thought it was very moving. And I did watch it with a bit of remove, then just, you know, this is a movie about two men working through it. Or not working through it as the case may be. And so I experience we're witness that a lot in my own life, you know? And I felt really attached and connected to it, I guess. It's interesting because the way that McDonough has framed some of this story has been talking about it through the lens of a breakup. And I think in some cases, a romantic breakup, but what he's captured in the film is a very recognizable and discrete tension between male friends. You know, he has a very interesting point of view on something that we don't necessarily see a lot of male friendships in movies. We don't necessarily necessarily see the end of a male friendship in a movie. And this one is very intentional, very allegorical, metaphorical, what calms decision to sort of pour himself into what he thinks is the purpose of his life and take himself away from what he thinks is sort of the waste of his life, which is represented in podrick, talking gleason plays calm and Colin Farrell plays podrick. And you could probably read the movie in a number of ways, but for me, the easiest way to read it is not as some big concept about warring nations or the history of societies. But just sometimes you change your focus and you lose touch and you make different decisions. That's such a you interpretation of this. I thought it was like a really interesting rendition of that. And then also just like the pain that either having empathy or a lack of empathy for that experience. I was thinking about you and how you are definitely about me and CR in a lot of ways. That was my first reaction when I saw it. I was like, this reminds me so much of my friendship with him. How weird it must be to be friends with me sometimes. And likewise, how weird is to be friends with you. But this is not what I was anticipating. What were you anticipating? Talking about the Irish Civil War in fables. No, of course I do. I think it's really interesting though that he seems to be both people when I was watching the movie. And I think in many ways, no one is just the person who's like, I need to pour myself into the life of my art and not everybody is just like we need to go to the puppet 2 p.m. every day and get hammered and that's our life. And so he almost like split himself in half is what it feels like and showed the two warring sides of his personhood, which I thought was really like a really interesting way to set up a dramatic struggle, you know? Like it's not a movie about two friends in the movie about a guy who was like, should I spend all my time working on my plays and my films or should I spend all my time just getting smashed because that's life and that's fun and life is kind of meaningless so let's just enjoy it while we can. Yeah, I mean you identify something with the McDonald that I think is pretty interesting from everything that I've read about him his sets are very congenial and pleasant and like he's like you do not need to yell to get good art like I try to I'm very touched by the story of one of the animals in this movie Jenny he loved so much that he paid for its retirement into perpetuity and it can just like roam Ireland and not work anymore. So he's this lovely guy who is like pretty driven and cutthroat and is almost like the reason I didn't do plays anymore is that movies are faster and it's important for me to get all this shit out of me while I am still of sound mind and body and like this kind of very singular driven vision of humanity, which is really, really dark.

Martin Mcdonagh Sean Fantasy Amanda Dobbins Martin Mcdonald Chris Colin Farrell Podrick Mcdonough Non Top Gun Maverick Departmen Sharon Siobhan Brendan Gleeson Chris Ryan Henry Louis Gates Bruges Mcdonald Coen Amanda SIR Ireland
A highlight from 177: They Call Us Raymond Lee

They Call Us Bruce

05:28 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 177: They Call Us Raymond Lee

"Time traveling is for white people. Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Bill you, and I'm Jeff Yang, and I'm incredibly excited. We are both incredibly excited to have with us a guest that we've literally been trying to get on for a little while ever since we first saw that this particular nostalgic show is being rebooted the show being of course quantum leap. The guest being even more, of course, Raymond Lee, the star of quantum leaf. Hey. Welcome. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. I'm so happy to be here. Big fans. So happy. The phantom was very mutual. I should say, I was not actually super immersed in the original show, Phil has actually been the one who's sort of like being the frequently asked questions guy for me. I was like, I'm not even sure what the fans are called like leaps or leapers or quantum heads or whatever. But I can say that watching this show blew my mind and I'm so glad it's here and that you're here and I can't say that about a lot of the more recent nostalgic reboots we've seen. So dude, excellent. Well, first off, thanks for watching the show. And second, also you shouldn't feel bad because I wasn't. I wasn't watching quantum leap first when it came out. I watched it the second time it came around and syndication. And it was introduced to me from a friend, and it was my first exposure to sci-fi. And I wasn't, you know, I don't remember all the episodes, but it's something that I've been slowly working my way through. So you shouldn't feel bad. I didn't watch it either. I was a big fan of the show, and but I probably watched most of it in syndication as well. But I'm a big, I like time travel narratives. And so the original show was like, a lot of fun. And amongst all the waves of the recent wave of reboots and remakes and things like that, I was always like, how come they haven't done that with quantum leap yet, you know? For years, I've been like, that show is ripe for this. And so when the inevitable announcement came that it was coming, I was like, already psyched. But let me tell you, I was pretty damn pumped when I heard that it was mister Raymond Lee in the lead role. I was like, what are you like, many wishes fulfilled in that moment. So this is super excited. Me, not least because I was already a big fan of you, ray. So, you know, I'm wearing my, by the way, I'm wearing my Cambodian rock band shirt. Thanks so much, man. I mean, you put me on very early too. I remember you had me do your segment. Who's angry now? I forgot, I forget what it's called. Oh, you're the angry reader of the week. And right when I first did here and now you had me on as a guest on that. And I was like, that's awesome. I mean, you've supported me from the beginning, so I'm so, I'm so happy to be here. This is great. I mean, honestly, the story of your journey is itself quite a leap as it were. I might also add a fan of yours also a fan of other Raymond Lee's. Yeah. All right, accidentally tagged on Twitter. Yeah. Oh man, this show is great. Wrong Raven Lee. And that other Raymond Lee's awesome. Got a voice like Luther Vandross is crazy. Yeah, shout out to ray. He's also a friend of mine, so, you know, poor ray though. He probably got pelted with quantum leap stuff when you're casting announcement. We both been very good about directing to the proper Raymond and it's just fun. It's fun now at this point. It's almost as if you were kind of leaping into each other's identities and existences. But that said, let's talk about your own existence as it were. And I mean, you know, following your career for a while, obviously. And knowing that you started out on stage and have moved into the TV, film world, et cetera. It still was quite an incredible occurrence to see you at the center of this thing. And, you know, I guess if you could share a little bit more how all that happened, that would be amazing. Yeah, I was just as surprised as you were. I'm sure when you heard the news, when I got the news, you know, I was out in Massachusetts. I was working on the second season of Kevin can fuck himself and I got a voicemail and an email from Meg fister, who's one of the producers on quantum leap, saying that they wanted me for the lead of the show. And I was like, what as I didn't register, even though I was double confirmed between email and voicemail, I was like, this doesn't make sense, so I called my manager and she was like, no, this doesn't make sense. And then it turns out it was all factual information and all that was left to do was for me to read the script and to say yes. And got on a call with Martin gerro a showrunner the next day and I said yes because I had to sleep on it even though it was a no brainer.

Raymond Lee Asian America Jeff Yang Mister Raymond Lee Bruce Raven Lee Phil Bill Luther Vandross RAY Raymond Meg Fister Twitter Massachusetts Kevin Martin Gerro
A highlight from #896: Armageddon Time / Causeway / Wendell & Wild / Triangle of Sadness

Filmspotting

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from #896: Armageddon Time / Causeway / Wendell & Wild / Triangle of Sadness

"You guys putting on here today? We're not interested in art? No. No, look, we're going to do this thing. We're going to have a conversation. From Chicago, this is film spotting. I'm Josh Larson. And I met him campanar. I think we want to be an artist when I grow up. It's going to be an artist if you want to be. Nothing's going to stop you. You're going to college. You have dinner with kings if you place your scars right. Most of the ensemble there in that short clip from James gray's new film Armageddon time. Anthony Hopkins, Anne Hathaway, Jeremy strong, and young actor banks repetitive. The film has gray looking back on his own childhood, for inspiration. We've got a review of Armageddon time, which isn't select cities now and expands next weekend. Plus, thoughts on a slew of new and recent releases, we're going to hit triangle of sadness, Wendell and wild, and Jennifer Lawrence in causeway. That and more, Adam, you can be a film critic when you grow up, nothing's going to

Josh Larson Jeremy Strong James Gray Anthony Hopkins Chicago Anne Hathaway Wendell Jennifer Lawrence Adam
A highlight from Ten Movies to See Right Now. Plus, James Gray Returns!

The Big Picture

05:58 min | Last month

A highlight from Ten Movies to See Right Now. Plus, James Gray Returns!

"Is the big picture a conversation show about personal apocalypses we are in a tremendously hectic period at the movies right now with awards season picking up pace, the streaming wars and high gear, some major event movies right around the corner though not yet here on today's show Amanda and I will have a speed round of recommendations to make sense of the month in movies. After that I encourage you to stick around as writer director James gray returns to the show to talk about his new film Armageddon time, it's one of my favorites of the year. This is James fourth time on the show. He's one of our most requested guests, our conversation as usual, went deep into his film, state of the movie industry, and the state of James, so please stick around for that. First, let's talk about movies Amanda. There are so many, we'll start with Armageddon time. James is latest film. This is an interesting piece. It's by far his most autobiographical movie. It is ripped almost entirely from his life as he's coming of age in Queens in the late 70s and early 80s. Star studded cast Jeremy strong and Hathaway Anthony Hopkins. This is, I guess, a contender for awards season, but is certainly more a personal piece beyond that. What do you think? I'm a fan of James grace movies. There is a lot to discuss here. You mentioned that it's autobiographical and I want to start with the child performance. This is set in 1980. I think exactly. And so the James gray stand in is 11 years old and is played by a young actor named banks ripetta, who is, I think, wonderful and also, if you were familiar at all with James gray or what and have listened to his interviews on unmistakably him, it's really uncanny. Remarkable. I spent some time being like, is this one of James gray's children? Yeah. So I really was amazed by the performance and I think the performance summarizes what is best about this movie, which is this memo stick through the eyes of a child. And James gray kind of excavating and remembering his youth, which I think he does beautifully and it is very emotional and evocative and especially Anthony Hopkins plays his grandfather or the grandfather. I mean, you know, you've spoken to him so you can tell me more like how much we should just take this as autobiography. I think a lot of it is very, very close to his experience. You know, Anthony Hopkins is tremendous in this movie. I think so those are the aspects of it that really worked for me. This is also a movie set in purposefully in 1980 to comment on the political moment in 1980 and it brings in the Trump family like literally. And it's clearly a movie not just about personal wrecking, but also reckoning with that moment in time and how it parallels the recent American history, if you will. And I think there are some strong points in that and some limitations in that as well, which is mostly just a limitation on how much of that content a, you want to consume in general and be you want this perspective on. But the personal stuff to me, it was very beautiful. Yeah, I think that's well put. There's a kind of paradox in the movie because on the one hand, the only person who could tell the story is James gray. And the detail and the care that is put into the performances and the specificity of the setting the milieu is pretty incredible. It's like a pretty amazing accomplishment in terms of just like kitchen sink drama. It is a movie, though, that is fundamentally about how James got here and how we got here. And so the idea literally of white privilege of race and power and class in New York City and in the United States of America are essential core themes of the story. That's a big swing that's a lot. That's a lot to chew on. And so I think some people will have a complicated reaction to some of that stuff. And the idea of who gets to tell whose story is a complexity there too, but I think in this case, he's the only person who can tell his story. So I too am from an immigrant family in Queens that was middle class and upper class aspirant and conscious of our station in life and looking for looking toward art for inspiration and escape. And that is really what the movie is about. Sure. It's about Donald Trump, and it's about how fascism rises or whatever, but it ultimately I think when it's at its best, like you said, it's about this kid and it's about this kid figuring out who he is and how he fits into the world. Yeah. We should say it's also about another kid who's played by Jalen Webb, who plays Johnny, a young black kid who Paul the main character befriends. And I think it's sort of indicative that we had the whole conversation without mentioning Jalen Webb, who plays an essential role, who's wonderful. And really affecting and plays an essential role in the film, but I think there will be discussion about how that character in that particular revelation and the understanding of white privilege and the takeaways from this film. Will be a source of continued conversation. It has been. And I asked James about that and he had a passionate response. Our friend Adam Neiman described this movie as fatalistic, which I thought was an interesting read on it that there is a sense that we are kind of fucked and that this is a centuries long cycle of power shift and I thought that was interesting. I'm not totally sure how I feel about that. I've seen it a couple of times now. I was very touched by the movie, and so when I have an emotional response to being the cyborg that I am, I don't think of it as cynical, though I am truly at heart, a cynic. Did you think it was hopeful at all? I thought it was incredibly hopeful. And maybe that was, especially the last shot,

James Gray James Jeremy Strong Hathaway Anthony Hopkins James Grace Amanda Banks Ripetta Anthony Hopkins Queens Jalen Webb United States Of America Donald Trump New York City Adam Neiman Johnny Paul