Sustainability

Go green with the latest in sustainability news.

A highlight from The pandemic has put communities through a crash course in disaster response

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The pandemic has put communities through a crash course in disaster response

"On rent and faced possible eviction. Many people who had never needed assistance before suddenly did. John Travis Marshall is an associate professor at Georgia state university college of law. He says the pandemic for state and local agencies to grapple with the shocking amount of need that can arise when any sort of disaster shuts down businesses, at least people jobless, even for a short time. They're beginning to collect data because the pandemic about the vulnerable populations with respect to housing and understand what the potential need is for a climate related disaster, another pandemic God forbid. He says COVID is also highlighted flaws in the systems that provide aid, and barriers that prevent people from applying for help. So we know that we've got a problem with delivering basic services, not just to the communities that have traditionally in historically been in need that actually do a substantially larger group of people. So communities have received an unwanted crash course in disaster response, and Marshall hopes it gives them data and motivation to better prepare for future crises, including those caused by a warming climate. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this,

John Travis Marshall Georgia State University Colle Covid Marshall Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from EP85. The truth about wild-harvested beauty

Green Beauty Conversations

01:19 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from EP85. The truth about wild-harvested beauty

"Now that naturals have become the norm for many beauty products, it stands to reason that the cosmetics industry is clamoring for interesting and exotic botanicals to make the latest and greatest claims for their formulations. Indeed, when you attend any cosmetics industry trade show, you tend to be bombarded with the hottest new plants and in the rarest pockets of the most far flung places around the world. But given that the beauty industry encourages us to consume endless personal care products, should we really be using that many rare and exotic plants? And if we do, should they be cultivated for us, potentially using land that could be used to feed people, or should we be using wild populations of plants? As you'll remember from my recent podcast on whether essential oils can ever be sustainable, we discussed this very topic. And it's one that I feel the beauty industry really isn't addressing properly yet. So what happens when beauty brands decide to go down the wild harvesting all wild sourced route for the plants in their formulations? How do we know that this is a sustainable way to source ingredients? One certification body called fair wild is working hard to look after our global wild plant resources and the people that depend on them. In this episode, we're going to pick apart how the beauty

A highlight from Shipping industry is pressured to cut pollution caused by merchant fleet

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Shipping industry is pressured to cut pollution caused by merchant fleet

"The shipping industry is a Technicolor mess. Huge container ships are stuck at ports waiting to be unloaded. And as they idle, those ships are creating pollution and effort to fix this problem is not going well. Here's NPR's Jackie northam. The shipping industry's contribution to globalization has been huge. About 90% of the world's trade is transported by sea. But the cost to the environment is enormous. Every year those container ships plying the world's waterways spew about 1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the air, which is about 3% of all greenhouse gas emissions. For many years, the emissions were just part of the cost of globalization. Give the pun, but there's been a total sea change in the last three or four years. Simon Bennett is with the international chamber of shipping, a global trade association representing about 80% of the world's fleet. He says the shipping industry as a whole is committed to total decarbonization by 2050. Bennett says that's created an urgency amongst ship owners to meet that deadline. And ultimately, for individual shipping companies, the issue will become extension, because if you don't abide with the regulations, which are fairly strictly enforced globally, then ultimately your ship won't be able to trade. The key will be to use carbon neutral or green fuel, but that hasn't been developed yet, at least not on a commercial scale and new ships are both expensive and still designed to run on oil. But Maersk, the world's largest shipping company is taking a leap of faith. Morton bought Christensen is the head of decarbonization for the company. The situation was that nobody was producing the green view because there were no green ships. And nobody built the green ships because there was no green fuel. So we had this chicken and egg type situation. And then we decided to say, well, somebody needs to break that egg. And that's what we did. Mars recently ordered 8 enormous container ships worth more than a $1 billion that will run on sustainably produced methanol. It's reaching out to a multitude of companies to both develop the fuel and make enough of it to power the new Maersk ships. Christensen says it'll take about 350,000 tons of green methanol a year to run the vessels. Right now, the biggest challenge, honestly is to get the price down to a level where, you know, where the loss is manageable on our end because these fuels are more expensive. And our company has a fuel builder around $6 billion a year. So if you double attribute that, it's not trivial. Maersk says some of its biggest customers are willing to help shoulder the cost for a green solution to shipping. Danielle had ship at zero, an environmental coalition says retail giants can have a role to play in decarbonizing the shipping industry. If we can get these influential retail giants like Amazon, Ikea, Walmart and target to make commitments to zero emission shipping, that will send a market signal in that direction that other companies will follow. Those retail companies say they are willing to join an effort to dramatically reduce or even end shipping emissions by 2040. Hari says his group wants that to happen by the end of this decade. Jackie northam, NPR news.

Jackie Northam Simon Bennett International Chamber Of Shipp Maersk Christensen NPR Bennett Morton Mars Danielle Ikea Walmart Amazon
A highlight from How people are working to protect giant sequoias from wildfires

Climate Connections

01:28 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How people are working to protect giant sequoias from wildfires

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. California Sierra Nevada mountains are the only place where giant sequoias grow. These massive trees can live for many centuries, but thousands are falling victim to increasingly extreme wildfires. We have generated a situation that creates fire that they can not tolerate through fire suppression and climate change. That's Christie Brigham of Sequoia and kings canyon national parks. She says in 2020, a wildfire killed more than 10% of large sequoias. That event prompted the National Park Service and other land management agencies to form a coalition to protect the most at risk sequoias. For example, by reducing debris and brush that could fuel fires. But this fall, high severity fire tore through some Sequoia groves again. Firefighters protected a few trees by wrapping them with flame retardant foil. But Brigham says they were still heartbreaking losses. If we can learn from this and continue to make progress in landscape scale forest resilience and addressing climate change through more prescribed fire through fuel reduction and through all the things we can each do to address climate change, then the losses won't be in vain. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liza Woods California Sierra Nevada Mount Christie Brigham Kings Canyon National Parks Sequoia Groves Sequoia National Park Service Brigham Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from What's the environmental impact each time we hit 'buy now,' and can we change course?

Environment: NPR

05:09 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from What's the environmental impact each time we hit 'buy now,' and can we change course?

"That we're in the middle of the holiday season, we are buying even more. But what do we do with all that stuff? And what does all that stuff do to a rapidly warming planet? Those are things we're going to talk about with journalist JB McKinnon. He is author of the day the world stops shopping, how ending consumerism saves the environment and ourselves. JB McKinnon welcome. Thanks so much. Glad to be here. Glad to have you with us. It occurs to me as I say it out loud that the subtitle of your book is probably a pretty good place to start. Give us a few examples of how what we buy affects the effects the environment. Well, it affects every environmental crisis that we face. In fact, at this point, according to the UN panel that studies global natural resources, consumption is the leading driver of our environmental problems around the world today, surpassing even the growth of the human population on the planet. So you name it, it drives it deforestation toxic pollution, climate change. Mining, even fisheries, even the extinction of species is tied in tightly to our consumption. Can you give one concrete example that would drive one of those home? Sure. Well, one of the issues that I looked at that I thought was most surprising was the way that consumer culture is now affecting whales. We thought that we had saved the whales by ceasing to hunt them. But now things like the search for minerals and fossil fuels on the seafloor is creating noise pollution that's having a profound effect on whales ability to communicate with each other. And one of the most common ways that North Atlantic right whales and endangered species in the United States actually end up dying is being struck by the cargo ships that bring us our things. One whale conservation is said to me, you know, every time you hit that buy now, button on Amazon, you're helping power up the ships that are running down endangered whales off the east coast of the United States. You're talking about the environmental impact of all of the buying that we do. Did we have something of a trial for how we might do better how we might do this differently towards the beginning of the pandemic? Yeah, in the early weeks and months of the pandemic when much of the world was really quite literally locked out of consumer culture, we saw really dramatic effect on the environment. We really saw how just lifting that hand of human pressure off can have immediate impact in terms of environmental problems of a variety of kinds. So many people will remember how there were these bluer than blue skies in cities around the world. And some of the most dramatic changes in the skies occurred in those Asian cities that produce a lot of the world's consumer goods. And which were some of the most air polluted cities on the planet. It was just factory smokestacks, not operating for a few weeks. Yeah. That's absolutely right. And we saw the biggest and deepest drop in carbon emissions ever recorded through that global slowdown in that production and consumption. System. We saw the resurgence of the natural world, especially in those places where mass tourism had retreated. And again, mass tourism is very much a part of the consumer lifestyle today. I suppose the challenge is nobody wants to stay in the moment that was the early days of the pandemic. So what is sustainable if we were to try to wean ourselves off some of the more and more and more and more and more buying? One of the things that was really driven home to me while working on this book was the fact that if we want to reduce consumption, we really have to do so in a managed way by making changes in the system itself. We live in a consumer society and we have built an economy that depends on more and more consumption by all of us every year. So if we simply slow down, then we know what the effects of that are. It drives an economic crisis. It's a different kind of system that we need. You're reminding me of something that our guests on this subject said yesterday in the middle that you listen and then respond. 70% of GDP is dependent on consumption, which really does lead to a great dilemma around our growing awareness of environmental degradation that comes with these high level of private consumption. And on the one hand, we can say that we're living in a world with too much waste of overconsumption.

Jb Mckinnon United States North Atlantic UN Amazon
A highlight from Climate change is blamed for dramatic flooding in British Columbia

Environment: NPR

04:34 min | Last week

A highlight from Climate change is blamed for dramatic flooding in British Columbia

"Canadian British Columbia experienced both a heatwave and wildfires this past summer. Now it is having record rainfall. Here's Emma Jacobs reporting from the Fraser valley. Hot breakfast. Awesome. It's been two weeks since an atmospheric river, a current of wet air from the tropics dumped a normal November's worth of rain on southern British Columbia in just two days. But the ground is still saturated with more rain on the way. The biggest issue this time around is that the ground won't take anymore. My client and organizer of a volunteer sandbag making operation in abbotsford said that he and his kids had been out here all week. We got trucks lined up down the road and they're still coming. A big area of town called Sue mass Prairie is still underwater and will be draining for weeks. This mountainous region is used to a lot of rain and even the occasional landslide that blocks roads. But people here say they've never seen damage on this scale. Landslides from the initial reigns two weeks ago killed four people trapped hundreds of travelers on the highway and another 1500 in the small town of hope, where crystal sidor lives. I was shocked by the number of cars that I saw just parked along the side of the roads, the little side roads, it looked like there were people sleeping in their cars. The power was out, but sidor started cooking. She put a sign out front that said soup is on here and started feeding stranded travelers. I had people come by, they brought me some deer and some moose meat because they had been trapped here after had their hunting trip. Hope was cut off for days, helicopters, boats, and small planes brought in food and took out people with medical conditions. Those first rains also temporarily cut all major road and railroads connecting the city of Vancouver and Canada's largest port to the rest of the country. Some repairs will take into next year. This all comes just months after a heat dome blamed for hundreds of deaths hit British Columbia. Forestry researcher Peter wood says the heat and fire season have likely made water volumes coming down the mountains now worse. Intense fire. It can actually kind of cook the soil it bakes it kind of hard. So you can imagine following a fire, a big flood like this comes along. And it just runs right off of it. Would recently authored a report for the Sierra club on how clear cut logging by British Columbia's big lumber industry also contributes to environmental hazards. The forestry alone causes a landscape to be more fire prone and more flood phone, but you combine that with climate change, which in itself is going to make things more extreme and it's like extreme times extreme. The federal government has pledged funding to build more climate resilient infrastructure. But last week, Canada's independent environment commissioner called the government's continued support of oil and gas production incoherent with its stance on climate change. Meanwhile, climate change's impacts are inescapable in British Columbia. Chris vecchia has come to fill sandbags in abbotsford. We had fire that raised the town this year. There was a tornado in Vancouver. There's mass flooding and avatar. There's mass flooding up north. He wants to see the government improve flood protections, but also take steps to reduce Canada's emissions. The powers that be, listen, and we start making incremental changes. For now, he says he is focused on making sandbags to protect Abbott's Ford. Let's hope it all holds. He says, for NPR news, I'm Emma Jacobs in abbotsford, British Columbia. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One, with early paycheck, you can get your direct deposit up to two days earlier, and with no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts, banking with Capital One is the easiest decision. Terms apply, see Capital One dot com slash bank, Capital One NA, member FDIC. From NPR, this week we bring you the story of Emilia, a Mexican woman with an unusual condition every time she hears a word, she also tastes it. What she has is called synesthesia and no doctor has ever analyzed the mysteries of her brain. Until now.

Emma Jacobs British Columbia Sue Mass Prairie Abbotsford Fraser Valley Columbia Peter Wood Canada Vancouver Chris Vecchia Sierra Club Npr News Federal Government NPR Government Abbott Ford Fdic Emilia Synesthesia
A highlight from Book tells 1,001 firsthand stories of climate change from around the world

Climate Connections

01:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Book tells 1,001 firsthand stories of climate change from around the world

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Evidence of climate change is all around us. But when presented in data and graphs, it can feel disconnected from real life. It's hard to understand exactly what a degree of temperature change or a few millimeters of sea level rise might mean to someone's lived experience. So journalist Devi lockwood spent 5 years traveling the world talking to people about how rising seas and extreme weather affect their lives. An elder in the Arctic Canadian community of igloolik told lockwood that melting sea ice makes it harder to hunt walrus and seal. A mother on the island of Tuvalu described how during a drought she had to choose between using her water rations for drinking or bathing her baby, and the son of farmers in Thailand explained that he moved to the city to find work because erratic rainfall has made rice farming less reliable. Lockwood collected these and other stories in her new book a 1001 voices on climate change. My hope is that reading this book makes people feel more connected to the issues and better able to understand how climate change is impacting people's daily lives around the world. And she hopes that humanizing the issue can help inspire people to get engaged and take action. Climate connections is produced by the

Anthony Liza Woods Devi Lockwood Igloolik Lockwood Tuvalu Thailand
A highlight from Hanukkah story can inspire energy conservation, rabbi says

Climate Connections

01:28 min | Last week

A highlight from Hanukkah story can inspire energy conservation, rabbi says

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Hanukkah means dedication and Hebrew, and rabbi Katie Allen says the holiday is an ideal time for Jewish people that dedicate themselves to climate action. We have a responsibility to do as much as we can to diminish our personal impact in our communal impact. Allan is cofounder of the Massachusetts based Jewish climate action network. She says the story of Hanukkah invites people to consider how they can conserve energy today. As the story goes, a one day supply of lamp oil kept a menorah in the second temple of Jerusalem lit for 8 days. How do we use that image of like okay, we need one crews of oil to go much farther. So how do we make better use of the sources of energy that we have available to us? And in a way that then reduces our consumption of fossil fuels. She says, reflecting on the miracle of the lamp oil, can provide inspiration. Every day it was like, oh my gosh. It still lasting it still lasting. So there's a message of hope there. So she says that as people celebrate Hanukkah, they can find renewed energy for climate action. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liza Woods Rabbi Katie Allen Massachusetts Based Jewish Cli Allan Jerusalem Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Nalleli

PODSHIP EARTH

04:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Nalleli

"Naile and her community fought tooth and nail, and eventually triumphed in getting the Allen co owned oil facility to close. Naile is now 20 and has spent more than half her life fighting oil drilling in neighborhoods across her city. But it's comic great personal hardship and sacrifice. I stopped by asking nae Ellie to describe growing up on west 23rd street in LA. My neighborhood is made up of the most hardworking people. You can imagine there are people that work 1416 hour days to provide for their families that are the most happy and caring sense of community that you can imagine if my mom wasn't able to pick me up from school. She would just say, or a neighbor is gonna pick you up and take care of you for the day. No big deal, and I would just hang out with our neighbors or if we were walking and we saw the ice cream man and we didn't have any cash, it was totally fine to just grab ice cream or two and just pay him tomorrow when I saw him again. It was that sense of community that we had. It was a sense of just everyone being a neighbor and as a family, you don't have salt glass the name or maybe he'll have salt and tomatoes for you. Is that sense of family that you could knock on everybody's door with their home and their family being as welcoming to you as your own is to you? And do you still live there? I moved when I was 14, but I'm back in my head still. When I think of home, I do think of that community and I don't think I'll ever feel as home as I felt there. Nay Ellie, you also had some less than great neighbors. It was our neighbor that our silent killer neighbor, Alan gold energy was growing up 30 feet across the street from an active oil well, and breathing those toxic emissions and seeing our health decline as a matter of that, it was then a common conversation starter within our community for the parents to be like, my daughter had an asthma attack last night, how's your son, asthma doing? Or my daughter had such a bad nose bleed. That's how we would greet each other. not how it should be. When did it turn from like, oh yeah, there's an oil well to holy crap. That's polluting our neighborhood. We moved into that apartment building when I was four, so I had no idea the well, I won't go operates behind these really big tall walls. So it was always up to my imagination. What was behind there? And I used to think it was a parking structure. For a time I thought it was an amusement park and it was always jealous that they didn't let me in. Because I wanted to go on the fun rides. It wasn't until 2011 when Allen go had a weeklong leak. That my community smelled like guava. So when drilling for oil, there's already so many chemicals exposed to the air and toxins. But what I'll go would do is they would use even more chemicals to sort of mask the smell. So then the community would smell like chocolate or fake guava citrus. Just to cover their tracks. So when they had the leak that we realized and I was ten years old and I went inside from a late night yoga class with my sister and the smell was so bad, I just thought it was like maybe an outside thing and just went inside and the house was empty, which is really weird for us because we were a family of like 12, like the house is always full and my mom comes out of the room and is like, oh everybody, we're all sleeping in one room tonight with the air purifier, like the smell is actually this oil well. And that's when we were like, oh, crap, this is something actually really serious. So all 12 of us left in my sister's room with the air purifier on. And the next day I remember my mom and I walked to school, but we went earlier to stop in front of alcohol and read every sign. I mean, an assign that has always stuck with me is one that reads toxic chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer, birth defects and reproductive harm. And that's not like a pencil case. It's not on the skittles bag. That's on an oil well facility, 30 feet away from my home. An oil that operates with 9 surrounding schools in the area. And they share the wall with two of them, a high school for children with

Naile Allen Co Nae Ellie Nay Ellie Alan Gold Asthma Attack LA Allen California Cancer
A highlight from Invasive green crabs are threatening local species. The solution? Eat them

Environment: NPR

03:45 min | Last week

A highlight from Invasive green crabs are threatening local species. The solution? Eat them

"UA. To save the crabs, you gotta eat more crabs. It's not oversimplified, but invasive green crabs have been increasing on the West Coast for more than 30 years, and researchers say the population of these European shellfish now threaten local species like the celebrated dungeness crab. What to do about the green crabs? Sean schooler says, catch and cook. He lead scientist of the absolute national estuarine research reserve and joins us now from Charleston Oregon. Thanks so much for being with us. Hello, happy to be here. So what puts this crab crisis at a tipping point? Well, we've been recording the numbers for 20 years in Oregon, and we're finding now that the numbers are going up each year since 2016. So it seems like we're there now and we have to think about what we're going to do about it. Why can't the green crab and the dungeness just get along? Well, unfortunately, they like to eat each other. When the dungeness crabs are large, they'll eat the green crabs. And when the dungeness crabs are small, the green crabs will eat them. And so you have two different crab species in the estuary that are both predaceous and they will eat each other. They'll tell us about the recommendation that comes down now to catch and cook. Well, we think about how do we control and invasive species. There's many ways to do it. Sometimes you try to eradicate them, which is not a possible in this case, because they're coming in from the outside into our systems. So we can't actually control them that way. And we can use other ways like bounty systems or do you continuous trapping, which other people do. But since they are edible and there are fisheries in Italy and in Portugal, and they're building them along the east coast. We figured, why not let people know about the problem and now that they're in high numbers, they're easy to trap and they're easy to catch. And they're easy to eat it to prepare. Have you eaten a green crab? I have not eaten a green crab yet, but who have some recipes on my mind? The only problem with them is that they don't get as large as our dungeness crabs, and we like to look like easy eating, right? We like to have a big crowd that we can crack open and eat the meat out of the claws. And yeah, yeah. And the green crab just don't get that big. But there are other recipes for it. You can do soft shell crabs, like they do on the east coast with blue crabs. You could do soft shell with a mold. Or use them for stock. And of course, you can pull the meat out. It just takes more effort. You have an idea what they taste like is compared to a dungeness, which of course is famous for its savory flavor. And by the way, I've got to tell you if you tell me it tastes like chicken. I will ask you to see your academic credentials. But go ahead. I do not think that tastes like chicken, but I've heard that taste like other crab species. And so I don't know if they're quite as savory as dungeness. But I've had again colleagues on the east coast that they taste just as good as a blue crab out there. They know they're not a bad tasting thing. Any recipe in particular, you're eager to try. Actually, another colleague of mine is this week going to try to do put it on pizza. And some green crab, pesto, pizza. And I think the ramen, there's a ramen recipe that I'm really excited about that just uses the broth of the crabs. And along with noodles. So it's ramen noodles and crab broth. That's right. Oh, mercy. Have any idea how many people would have to start eating green crabs to make a dent? Well, even one crab theoretically is causing problems. So any cred that you eat has some effect. Probably you would need to remove several thousand a year from the estuaries to really reduce the impact. We don't really know what that number is yet, but certainly I mean, it can't hurt. Sean schooler who is lead scientist at Oregon's south sleuth national estuarine research

Sean Schooler Oregon National Estuarine Research Re East Coast West Coast Charleston Portugal Italy
A highlight from The butterflies are back! Annual migration of monarchs shows highest numbers in years

Environment: NPR

02:58 min | Last week

A highlight from The butterflies are back! Annual migration of monarchs shows highest numbers in years

"Every year monarch butterflies from all over the western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and 90s, more than a million made the trip, lately, those numbers have fallen. The last few years we've had less than 30,000 butterflies in last year. We actually dropped below 2000 butterflies. So really, an order of magnitude change in a short time period. Biologist Emma pelton is with the xerxes society, a conservation group. She says pesticides and habitat loss play a role in that decline. But this year, things are already looking up. We already see numbers way better than the last couple of years. As of yesterday, biologists and volunteers from Mendocino taba have counted more than 100,000 monarchs. It's kind of magical to just be in this closed in Woodland. In an urban area, like a cemetery or like a greenway. And then all of a sudden, poof, you're just like a Disneyland ferry princess surrounded by butterflies. Richard rockman is the LA county coordinator for the society's annual Thanksgiving western monarch count. We wanted to see some of this Disney magic for ourselves. So our editor Christopher and Toyota met up with rochman and volunteer Connie day at Woodland cemetery in Santa Monica. So this is our mausoleum and the office building is in it was still dark out when they met. Why are we here in the dark? The monarchs hang out in the direction of her son. So as soon as they start to warm up, they start to move. It's really hard to count them when they're moving. Day says they had seen around 200 monarchs here in past weeks. You know, when you first see them, they look like the trees are dripping. And when they begin to flutter, we have people come and see them for the first time. And they gasped. And I guessed, and I've been doing it for a long time. And just the day before rochman had seen huge numbers in hermosa beach. I found 1400 on some of the Torrey pine and eucalyptus there. I was jaw dropped, shaking. Alas, on this day, there was no jaw dropping or shaking. Okay, there's one. I challenge one. The monarchs may have been microphone shy. Rochman and Dave tallied only 7 that morning. This is breathtaking. Not the kind of breathtaking I would hope for. But after our editor left the duo went down the road and found more than a hundred near the beach. The count continues until December 5th and aside from the bad day here and there, overall this year's numbers are encouraging. I'm a pelton says it's too early to know why. Nature has given us a second chance, but I do think we're in really dangerous territory. I think this is really good reason to take heart that there might still be time to make a difference. Pelton says,

Rochman Emma Pelton Xerxes Society Mendocino Taba Richard Rockman La County Connie Day Woodland Cemetery California U.S. Santa Monica Christopher Toyota Disney Hermosa Beach Monarchs Dave Pelton
A highlight from App allows citizen scientists to report invasive species

Climate Connections

01:25 min | Last week

A highlight from App allows citizen scientists to report invasive species

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Burmese pythons, feral hogs, murder hornets, some invasive species make for dramatic headlines. Others, such as a climbing vine called kudzu may sound less threatening, but they can cause major damage. It's not just the fact that the side of the highway doesn't look as nice with kids are growing on it. It's what plant is that could do choking out and what insect feeds on that plant and what bird feeds on that insect. Chuck barge around co directs the university of Georgia's center for invasive species and ecosystem health. He says that as the climate warms, many invasive species may be able to thrive in areas that were once too cold. So he says it's important to monitor the spread of invasive species, and everyone can help. His organization partnered with the U.S. forest service to create an app called wild spotter. With the app, people can identify and report invasive plants and animals they encounter while hiking, hunting or fishing on national forest land. Then agencies can take steps to intervene. If you can not prevent something, then the best solution is to find an early so you can quickly respond to it. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more

Anthony Liza Woods Chuck Barge University Of Georgia's Center U.S. Forest Service Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Global warming causes new problems for a Thanksgiving staple

Climate Connections

01:24 min | Last week

A highlight from Global warming causes new problems for a Thanksgiving staple

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Don Gates Allen is a fourth generation cranberry farmer in Freetown Massachusetts. I was basically born and raised growing cranberries. The global warming increases risks to the family business. For example, cranberry plants go dormant in winter. This cold period is critical to their growth the following season, so shorter warmer winters can reduce yields. And more erratic precipitation can threaten harvests. Massachusetts is seeing more heavy rains with longer dry spells in between. Excessive moisture can cause the fruit to rot, and periods of drought can make harvesting difficult, because cranberry growers typically flood their bogs and gather the right berries that float to the top. Gates Allen says that in 2020 we didn't have enough adequate water to do those deep floods that everybody is familiar with with those iconic commercials. To respond to these changes, Gates Allen and other farmers often share and reuse the water they need for harvesting. In her farm is experimenting with new cranberry varieties that may yield more berries on fewer acres, so less water is needed for harvest. By working hard to adapt, she hopes to keep her family's business thriving. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication.

Anthony Liza Woods Don Gates Allen Gates Allen Massachusetts Freetown Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from EP84. The beauty industry is avoiding the elephant in the room

Green Beauty Conversations

04:49 min | Last week

A highlight from EP84. The beauty industry is avoiding the elephant in the room

"So it made sense to add waterless beauty to the mix. And if you listen to our episode together, then you'll know that we did not think much of the marketing term waterless in relation to beauty since every single product has a water footprint. In fact, we concluded that waterless beauty might just be a load of greenwashing and the more I thought about it, the more annoyed I got that we allow these conversations to continue. So for that reason, I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to join me in asking why the beauty industry keeps avoiding the elephant in the room. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, chartered environmentalist biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Britannica. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beefy opinions, in which I share my takeaways from the podcast interview that we released last week. This short episode I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed as well as setting you a challenge to make the beauty sector a better place. So if you've listened to last week's podcast, then you'll know that Anna and I unpick the term waterless and questioned whether using less water is really going to be the answer to our sustainability challenges. You're also know that we concluded that water less is a marketing term that's generally been used by well meaning people who genuinely want to do and make the beauty industry a better place. But just seem to be focusing on the wrong things. And I see this everywhere I go, the beauty industry as a whole keeps latching on to concepts such as biodegradability or veganism or cruelty free, and then heralding their choices as the ultimate sustainability solution. Rather than just being a tiny component of the blueprint to a sustainable future. The media doesn't help either. I can't even begin to tell you how many articles I've read about how wonderful waterless beauty is, which gloss over the main sustainability issue we face. The fact that the industry encourages rampant out of control consumerism. Even recently, I had an email from a major cosmetic industry publication that asked the question what would it take for the beauty industry to actively clean up the environment as it innovates and grows? And there's the elephant in the room, overlooking the fact that this industry still wants to achieve infinite economic growth with finite natural resources. Why do they try and Herald a concept such as waterless beauty as the answer to our problems, but simultaneously try to get us to buy as much water as beauty as possible? How do those two concepts even marry together? The fact is that no one wants to face the ugly truth that the beauty industry needs a complete and total overhaul. That's really what my green beauty opinion is all about this week. When can we expect truly leadership in the cosmetics industry? A consortium of the world's largest personal care brands has recently announced a harmonised environmental labeling scheme for consumers. It's a step in the right direction, but it doesn't push far enough and still expects us to follow the same outdated model that's been around for decades. I see a lot of indie brands talking the right talk and my hope is that they will start to push change from a grassroots level. After all, Indy beauty has completely overhauled the beauty sector in the way it works with naturals in just a decade. So I think we can absolutely achieve the same with the way that we embed sustainability into our beauty products. So that's my challenge to you for this week. I've said it before and I'll say it again. We are in this together. And if you're listening to this, I want you to consider yourself part of the global sustainable beauty task force. To quote the infamous words of the lorax by Dr. Seuss unless someone like you has a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. I want you to join me in having these conversations. I want to encourage you to speak up. I do feel like I'm shouting into the void a little bit at the moment as the industry trade bodies, the big players, and ultimately the shoppers don't seem to be on board with the idea. Going right to the heart of what makes the beauty industry is unsustainable. But I can see a future where we take our bottles and jars to a local shop for a refill, made by a local company with sustainable ingredients. And I don't think that future is that far away. We've just got to push for it a little bit harder than we're currently doing. I hope you'll join me for my latest challenge. We are all in this together. And no one ever said any of this would be easy, but its conversations like the one I had with Anna last week, which I really hope you've listened to already that

Lorraine Dalmat Anna Herald Indy Dr. Seuss
A highlight from Living shoreline project uses natural remedies to reduce erosion

Climate Connections

01:28 min | Last week

A highlight from Living shoreline project uses natural remedies to reduce erosion

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Along the Elizabeth river in Norfolk, Virginia, storm waves, rising tides, and ship traffic have eroded long stretches of shore. Josh raglan is with Norfolk Southern, a rail company with a large coal export terminal there. The shoreline erosion was getting close to one of the main roadways, impacting the property in and out of the terminal. And so we needed to protect that asset. Norfolk Southern considered building a seawall, but the nonprofit Elizabeth river project proposed a cheaper and more sustainable option, a living shoreline. It's a way of bringing back the river's natural defenses against wave action Marjorie Mayfield Jackson directs the nonprofit. Along 900 feet of shore, workers trucked in sand and planted native marsh grasses to absorb water. They installed rocks to break the waves and laid down oyster shells to establish oyster habitat. So that you're not just staving off erosion and addressing rising sea levels, but you're recreating habitat. Jackson says this large living shoreline serves as an important model for how companies and communities can address the threat of sea level rise and extreme weather. It's green. It's healthy looking. It's gorgeous. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Elizabeth River Anthony Liza Woods Josh Raglan Norfolk Southern Norfolk Marjorie Mayfield Jackson Virginia Jackson Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Artificial island on Georgia coast to provide nesting habitat for shorebirds

Climate Connections

01:28 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Artificial island on Georgia coast to provide nesting habitat for shorebirds

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. In spring, many shorebirds such as Wilson's plovers and black skimmers lay eggs in shallow nests on southern beaches. And they're just little divots in the sand where birds can lay their eggs. Timothy kaisers with the Georgia department of natural resources. He says the eggs are often in danger of washing away in a storm, getting eaten by foxes or raccoons or being disturbed by people. Sandbar islands provide critical habitat for beach nesting birds because they're out of reach of most predators and people. But these islands are especially vulnerable to flooding and storm surges. And as these rise, the risks are growing. I've been working on the coast for ten years and just in that time frame have seen a real loss in the quality of habitat for beach nesting birds. This year, for example, we essentially had no black skimmer productivity on the coast of Georgia, no gobel turn productivity, quite limited, at least turned productivity. So Kai's department is working with the Army Corps of engineers to build an island for the birds and Georgia's altamaha sound. They're making it high enough that the nests are unlikely to wash away. We need to move pretty quickly to provide suitable habitat over the next decade. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liza Woods Timothy Kaisers Sandbar Islands Georgia Department Of Natural Gobel Wilson Kai's Department Georgia Army Corps Of Engineers Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | Last month

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

"When astronomer diane turn shack move to pittsburgh in nineteen eighty-one she noticed. Something big was missing from the night sky. When i grew up in new england you could just walk outside and look up and see the milky way. But when i arrived in pittsburgh the sky had started to decline in quality. Still she says at the time her students at carnegie mellon university were very familiar with the milky way they knew about stars and constellations. That is not the case anymore forty years later. I have to explain what the milky way is and describe what it looks like in a show pictures and they think those pictures are fake. Because of light pollution major constellations can be totally invisible in cities. The pittsburgh city council is now trying to do something about it with the help of scientists like turn check. It passed a dark sky. Ordinance last week to reduce light pollution. This city is going to replace streetlights with warm tone. Led lights and they're also going to install shields so that late doesn't travel up what we're trying to do is cut out the light at the blue end of the spectrum because blue light scatters more easily than red light in the atmosphere rate. That's why the sky is blue. So blue light scatters everywhere. It doesn't stay where your lighting and to measure progress. She has some help in the higher ups in august. The astronauts on the international space station took some pictures of pittsburgh for on a clear night. And that's the before shot. The astronauts are gonna continue to take pictures of pittsburgh so we will have during pictures and after pictures. Terzic believes that as the sky's get darker more people will look up. In wonder that means more people more children will be able to see it and the benefits of being connected to half of our universe. I can't overstate that. It's a spiritual thing to feeling of connection with the universe she's hopeful it will peak young people's interest in the stars above and encourage them to pursue subjects such as

Diane Turn Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Council Carnegie Mellon University New England Terzic International Space Station
The Not so Digital Workforce

Think: Sustainability

02:04 min | 2 months ago

The Not so Digital Workforce

"You may think of the digital workforce as zoom meetings and shed google docs but this trend encompasses a wide range of industries and types of work. This labor refers to a really wide suite of different types of work quite often The moment is being used to refer to digital knowledge. Work so any works. That's that can be undertaken through computers. I virtually remotely roth than having to be in a specific geographical location. That's david vissel. David is a human geography at the university of melbourne and he researches the changing relationship between people and place. There's a wide spectrum of other types of works that could equally be referred to as digital works so the economy in in cities. So things like uber and delivery and all of those new types of services that we're seeing springing up in in our cities that are absolutely reliance on networks of connected mobile phones and algorithms that drive that drive both the workers and consumers so even sectors threats we traditionally associate with being very different and very not digital say things like mining for example are increasingly using. Ai and different types of autonomous developments. So yes a labor certainly a massive consideration through across a lot of different sectors of the moment and it's very variable bull people participating in the digital workforce than ever before this rapid change is something. That's come out of necessity with the emergence of the pandemic but as david explains this influx of flexible and digital workers has an impact on the way how cities function well hit potentially involves all of us in terms of the effects that it has so even if you don't work at all and no doubt you purchase things and you use different online services so even consumers are using dish labor.

David Vissel University Of Melbourne Google David
Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

"Thank you susan. Leonida for being on the breaking green ceilings podcast. Today we want to talk about the implications of free trade agreements. On african women specially from food sovereignty perspective. But i will start with our standard introductory question here on the podcast. Which is what role has nature played in your life and i can start with the anita or interest wondering for that first. The iba the videos descends to nature because he document shower penalties or by the social food at of a economic committee's report i'm raised from finding community and finding for so we actually directed me when we're producing Another thing i'd like to talk for example when you're relaxing use nature of that alexa eastern To league or whatever he thought we offer meaningless. Nfl but so you're connecting with a natural acid and of course that aspects appreciation mitch Your ruin susan lesser very interesting question but just to say that we alive because later is alive and if we look after it looks to us just the same and i think in the last two years we have seen exactly what nature can do when they tell you that you need one hundred million to get about for sitting as a boxy jam when mitch as playing to you realize the narrative changes as what we are we are leaving it and it's accommodating us. I don't know if we're being kind too for that's another story but

Leonida Susan Mitch Your NFL Mitch
A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | 3 months ago

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

"A twenty year. Mega drought in the west is threatening hydropower. For millions of people so the federal government is taking emergency action it sending water from other reservoirs to lake powell to help. Keep the power turbines. They're spinning. here's michael. Elizabeth sack is from colorado public radio at elk creek marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some like walter. Slut cough are frustrated. Resumes legua up and down many times. But we're not happy with it this year. Of course because we're all getting kicked out early and we pay for slips for the season. Blue mesa is colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than thirty percent full. And now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to lake powell eric. Logan is head of operations at elk. Creek marina he had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us for sure. There's a bunch of employees. That doctor would be employed into october and suddenly they're out looking for employment in middle of august. The deepening drought in the west has dealt a double blow to blue mesa this summer with climate change there's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase. Evaporation so less water is making it into the colorado river and reservoirs like blue mesa and now the federal government is taking water from this lake into other reservoirs. If we were full it wouldn't be that big deal but since we're already so low and we're barely hanging on by our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight feet of water and suddenly we got shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water and there's nothing we can do about it. Lake powell on the utah. Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Logan worries the reservoir will need even more water from blue mesa. If the drought doesn't improve the question is are they going to release whatever we get. That would become a very big problem for everyone around here. Blue may sat and the other reservoirs were built in the nineteen sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need. It says john macleod. A water lawyer in colorado. The water always goes to lake. Powell and this release is part of the plan. And it's using the reservoirs for one of their intended purposes

Elizabeth Sack Elk Creek Marina Blue Mesa Powell Eric Creek Marina Colorado Federal Government Powell Logan Walter Michael Colorado River Mesa Lake Powell Utah Arizona John Macleod
White House Climate Advisor Says Despite Recent Disasters, Don't Lose Hope

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 3 months ago

White House Climate Advisor Says Despite Recent Disasters, Don't Lose Hope

"Deadly flooding wildfires heat waves and droughts these have been the headlines all summer in the us with similar disasters around the world to visiting new jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from hurricane ida president biden said we're at an inflection point every part of the country is getting hit by stream weather and We're now living in real what the country is gonna look like and if we don't do so we can't turn it back very much but we can prevent it from getting worse. Abidin administration is pushing bills. Which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the us. But right now. They're still facing major hurdles in congress here to talk about this with us is president biden's national climate advisor gina mccarthy. We'll come back to all things considered thank scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic. And even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting the climate policies. But it's been a really frightening summer and a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change. Why is that view wrong. Because a lot of people haven't first of all having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the united states. Which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way. I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active. It certainly would have liked action earlier but this is a tremendous opportunity. We have and. I don't want people to give up hope and i'll tell you why i'm not giving up. Hope number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line but also i want people to understand that we have opportunities with already existing solutions on climate. That will get us where we need to go and get us on. The trajectory to net zero i- job is to deliver the solutions. That's what this package that. The president has been negotiating in pushing his all about

Hurricane Ida Abidin Administration President Biden Gina Mccarthy Biden United States New Jersey Congress Scott
What's Stopping Weed Growers From Going Greener?

Climate Cast

01:36 min | 3 months ago

What's Stopping Weed Growers From Going Greener?

"So i've read. It takes the equivalent greenhouse gas emissions of tank of gas in your car. To produce an ounce of cannabis that seems surprisingly high. Is that accurate. Yes that is accurate in to be clear. It's a high energy efficient car not one of your trucks. That's gonna run a lot of gas. It's a pretty. We're looking at somewhere around forty miles a gallon. So i'm guessing electricity for the grow lights. is a big factor there. What else causes all those emissions. When you produce cannabis so cannabis is predominantly grown indoors. And you mentioned the grow lights create huge amount of energy consumption but what happens in addition to the lights is that these lights are really hot and so then you have to bring in a c. You have to bring in a lot of other systems that also take electricity to keep the climate perfect for growing cannabis. So this number jumped out at me. When i started reading about this cannabis. The industry's footprint. Already accounts for more than one percent of us electricity consumption and ten percent in massachusetts. How is the industry addressing those emissions. The problem right now is that no one's really thinking about this terms of how do we reduce the energy consumption. Some states are passing some laws massachusetts. For example is requiring growers to use led lights which does reduce the energy consumption. But a lot of states. Don't have these rules and the federal government overall just isn't talking about this.

Massachusetts Federal Government
Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

Real Food Real People

01:46 min | 3 months ago

Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

"So some people are really concerned that animals are like being exploited to produce milk for us to drink all dairy products for farms to profit. Or whatever what's your take on that you manage the cows on this farm your the the herds woman are these cows happy are they okay so we wouldn't be able to get quality of milk or volume of milk out of the cows at all if there were any sort of stress so it is not any. I'm gonna say farming in general their best interests to have stressed animals so by providing twenty four hours of feed and misters in the parlor. When it's hot and fans and most of these cal- pens have cow brushes in them just enrichment and that sort of thing. It provides them the most stable environment constant today today for them to go about their life thermal or an eat get milked of the pressure and consistent so by that consistency we get the most out of product. Cows don't really like change for one. I've been told no they dislike the same thing every day. I wouldn't want to eat the same thing every day but they seem to do pretty dang. Well yup no they. The heat is one thing the l. weather's out of everyone's control but it's in our best interest to try to keep it somewhat the same every single day so the barnes provide a nice stable temperature that we can kind of control with fans to keep the air flowing because air quality makes a really big difference in the animal. Health is their their pooping. They're coughing. They're doing all normal animal statham

Statham