Sustainability

Go green with the latest in sustainability news.

Rejoining the Paris Agreement of 2015

Scuba Shack Radio

06:06 min | Last week

Rejoining the Paris Agreement of 2015

"Last month december. Two thousand twenty. The paris agreement celebrated its fifth anniversary. Unfortunately the united states of america really wasn't part of the celebration given our withdraw effective in november of two thousand and twenty two thousand and fifteen seem so long ago and the world in the united states has changed so much since then from what has been reported we are poised to rejoin the paris agreement with the transition to president biden's administration wonder just how easy it is to rejoin. I hope it's as easy to rejoin as it was to withdraw. So what exactly is the paris agreement and why is it so important. I'm a little embarrassed to say that. I really didn't know that much about it. Which meant i needed to understand. Is treaty a lot more first off. Yes it is a treaty a legally binding international treaty that was executed in paris on december twelfth. Two thousand and fifteen now. It was executed by the parties of the united nations framework convention on climate. Change or you an fcc now the un fcc was established in one thousand nine hundred ninety two and it was originally based in geneva switzerland since nine hundred ninety five is located in bonn germany. It has a staff of four hundred and fifty people from over one hundred countries. The executive secretary of the un fcc is patricia. Espinosa of mexico. And she is held this position since two thousand and sixteen if you go to the un fcc website you can click on the paris agreement tab at the top from there you can view a short two minute video about the agreement. You can also access the actual agreement. Which is what i did. It's not a huge document. It's only twenty five pages long and consists of twenty nine articles. Article two sets the goal specifically article two paragraph one ace states the agreement in enhancing the implementation of the convention including ex objectives aims to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty including by holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below two degrees celsius above pre industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to one point five degrees centigrade above pre industrial levels article. You also states that we need to do this. In a way that does not threaten food. Production and making finance flow supporting low greenhouse emission gas and climate resistant development. The cornerstone article says that this agreement will be implemented to reflect equity and the principles of common but differentiated responsibilities based on national circumstances. Now that's pretty powerful to me. That means wealthy. Powerful nations should be the leaders. The treaty works on five year cycles. And we just completed the first cycle now in this first cycle the country's established what is called their nationally determined contributions or nbc's and that's what each nation is committing to do to reduce global warming. You can actually go. To the registry of nbc's it states that one hundred ninety countries have submitted their first nbc including the united states. Although that first one was submitted. September second two thousand and sixteen and at eight parties have already submitted their second. The united states go back then was to be seventeen percent below two thousand five emissions by twenty twenty and twenty six to twenty eight percent below the two thousand and five emissions by twenty twenty five it stated that are targets were fair but ambitious. I think the overarching theme of the agreement was that we were all in this together. Developed countries have to help developing countries. Everyone has to play their part. Perhaps this is the idea that we're all in this together is why the. Us gave notice to the secretary. General of the united nations that the usa would withdraw and he gave that notice on november. Fourth two thousand and nineteen with the effective withdrawal date of four november. Two thousand and twenty. How ironic or dubious that. This date was right around our presidential election. I guess the good news is we haven't been gone that long and we can again be a part of this more good news. Is that for the first time. In two thousand and twenty. The un climate conference started to have a dialogue about the ocean and in twenty twenty. One there is a push to get ocean-based climate solutions into the paris agreement. Not so good news. However is that the international maritime organization. Or i am oh who represent the shipping industry is backtracking on their commitments to put this into context the shipping industry emit as much greenhouse gas gases as the sixth largest countries emissions. So it's not trivial. So how close out this segment again. By stating that. I am encouraged with the very real aspect that the united states will again rejoin the paris agreement and we will renew our commitment towards addressing climate. Change

Paris FCC President Biden United States NBC Espinosa United Nations Bonn Geneva Patricia Switzerland Germany Mexico International Maritime Organiz
EV Used Car Values Are Holding Up

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

03:23 min | 2 weeks ago

EV Used Car Values Are Holding Up

"So the altium battery cells Gm and lg's the nine they've given it to the platform more than just the cells or the batteries that made into recently. They've been calling it. The ltm platform and that is going to be the foundation for all of their electric cars and thanks to a youtube channel by ray non navia. We can now check the construction process of that facility. That's going up in lewistown. Ohio a joint venture between gm and lg. Like i say according to inside hof the construction work is already done. The buildings are up the reeves on on. But you can see the buildings going up and surely there is so much still to do. But within several months they are on target to have that facility finish. There is an unhealthy obsession with watching tesla build factories and the busiest aspects of germany. Right now is probably drones above some way just outside of berlin or maybe texas facility asli. They're all the gigafactory is being built. Gm's with algae is coming along very nicely baking. It'll be out of the oven soon. And they company will install manufacturing equipment later this year. Production starts in two thousand nine hundred twenty two the spending two point three billion dollars on it. It's going to create one thousand one hundred new jobs in lordstown ohio and they're gonna make about thirty gigawatt hours annually of cells which is huge. It puts them just behind. Tesla's gigafactory in nevada. Funnily enough okay. Let's move on and on the podcast next. We're going to be talking about what's fascinating story next on the show an official look into battery safety and that's not to say that batteries are unsafe in any possible way but the american. Nhtsa nitsa is creating and a battery initiative for visas to coordinate looking at things like the research the investigations and the safety standards around battery safety. And that's a good thing because you know these are incredibly safe like the comic is themselves and the battery. Maker's is an amazing job with this. I feel so safe driving around. Evt's and you just think about because we've had cars combustion costs for hundred years. You don't think i'm driving. I'm putting my family and my baby inside a car which is carrying around litas. Some gallons of very high highly combustible liquid blows up. I mean when you look at the fire department and the fire brigade stats on cough. Is they've really coleman. And so when there's an incident of course it makes the news because they're so rat but normal 'cause burned down all the time. So i feel very safe driving a navy if you're drive already but it's really good news. The nhtsa has created an initiative to look at the kind of coordinated analysis of data investigations. When there's a crash an anon- crash event and look at diagnostics and even cybersecurity as well. That's all very important. According to the website Techno codex this initiative nitsa that it will conduct investigations into safety related defects in vs and be a central point on battery safety. That's very very important. Lots of people are doing this. But i think it will give consumers more confidence.

GM LG Tesla Lordstown Lewistown Reeves Nhtsa Youtube Ohio Berlin Texas Nevada Maker Cough Coleman Navy
Episode 169: cactus and succulent poaching - what you need to know

On The Ledge

02:39 min | Last week

Episode 169: cactus and succulent poaching - what you need to know

"Right now back to home schooling and trying to juggle work and domestic commitments. Then shout out to you. What that means for on the ledge podcast. Well hopefully not very much. I'm going to try to keep the show going on a weekly basis and keep up with the extra leaf episodes for patrons but it may impact the show a little bit. I'm really trying to prioritize my children's health and wellbeing at the moment because this is the second time they have been stuck at home and this time around. The weather isn't great. And so i'm doing my best to really prioritize them at the moment so of course the podcast will be here but it may be that. Some episodes ended up being a little bit shorter little bit less comprehensive than usual. But we'll see it goes. I'm going to do my best to keep on rolling. Because i love making the show. It's great for my mental health. And i know it's great for your mental health to what are we talking about this week. Well if you've ever wondered whether that very rare cactus. Your lusting after on the internet is an ethical purchase. This episode should help. I'm joined by jared margolis. Who's an academic who's been going behind the headlines to find out more about the trade in illegally obtained cacti and succulents plus. I'm answering a question about storing. Combs storing poems. Like sound of that. Keep listening thank you to those of you. Who sent lovely comments about my christmas bonus episode and for whoever it was who made this request may say once more by how back it has occurred to me that the fourth yes. You don right. The fourth anniversary of on the ledge. Podcast is coming up fast. It is actually on the for twenty eighth of february twenty twenty one that the show turns four and the friday before that happens to be a sunday. I will do some kind of episode marking that anniversary. And if you have any suggestions of what to include in that milestone episode then do let me know thank he also to all of you who have decided to support on the

Jared Margolis Combs DON
Salt Lake Citys two sustainable fire stations

Climate Connections

01:19 min | Last week

Salt Lake Citys two sustainable fire stations

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections fire. Department's mission is to protect people's lives and property and in salt lake city utah. The fire department prioritizes sustainability to we want to be part of the solution to our energy crisis and our environmental challenges that we have. We're always looking to minimize the carbon footprint. Active all our fire facilities that fire. Chief karl leib. He says the city opened two new fire stations in two thousand eighteen. Each has three hundred rooftop solar panels and geothermal heating and cooling now the city's installing even more solar panels at one of the stations with the goal of making it net zero that means it will produce at least as much energy as it uses and the firefighters like being there. It's really a home for the firefighters. They're there for forty hours straight. They eat their sleep there. And they feel very comfortable in these stations. And they're proud to be occupying these buildings. The buildings cost more to build than a typical fire station but there are also far more efficient with led lighting high performance windows in folding doors that minimize heat loss. So leap says the investment will pay off over time and energy savings and for the climate.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Chief Karl Leib Salt Lake City Utah
How To Talk About Human Population Issues Constructively

Rewilding Earth

04:13 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Talk About Human Population Issues Constructively

"So you sit there and you realize like all of these discussions about overpopulation are historically pretty racist in jingo gewiss stick and eugenicist in their origin because nobody You know maybe this is touchy for your listeners. But you know nobody ever takes a picture of like a pga tournament with a whole bunch of white people crowded together and say on god. There's too many people on the planet but they sure do zoom in on a big big crowd of black or brown people in some city and say oh my god there's too many people on the planet right and so that's just the nature the origin of of this debate. Even if people were right in their assessment that there's too many people on the planet earth can't support that many people the framing of it was wrong and then because of this kind of paternalistic eugenicist racist you know origins of the concern the pathway. to resolving it was always paternalistic kind of the population policy approach. Not realizing i think in the fifties the nineteen fifties through the nineteen seventies the power of empowering strategies and again if we just Empower educate integrate into the workforce And provide access to family planning technology for all women on the planet this would resolve itself. And that's really the crux of the book. And what's funny. I think is when i give my you know my big lectures my big talks with all my maps and my powerpoint. You can feel the tension in the room until i get get to the fact that it can be resolved or women's empowerment and then you just get like a round of applause and cheering and nobody knew it's not in the in the you know the popular mind and i think that's the biggest problem we've had. Who are people really having those discussions. Still about overpopulation. They are. But i believe it's a generational thing and i actually don't try to impede malice to you. Know a lot of older generations the language you learn when you're young you use it even if it doesn't necessarily fit your do your new view of the world You know we all fall back on old habits and old language But also you know. I gave some talks at the royal society and the royal geographical society. And you know some of their some of their older patrons would come. And i appreciate them showing up but i get questions from old british you know folks in their seventies and eighties and they say you know but don't we need population policy to keep those people from you know breeding animals. And you're like dude. I don't think he meant to phrase it that way. But in some cases they do and that's part of the problem right because there is a history of that. And if i were someone you know from another part of the world you know where the total fertility rate is is higher and i hear somebody come in and start talking about population and their white from the us or the uk or or europe. I i'm sure i would. Squint my eyes and listen very carefully about the words coming out of their mouth because it is part of the history of this whole thing and you know it's just yell at people say chris don't write this book. Don't go with that message. You're gonna end up being one of those people. And i'm happy to say but i'm not one of those people read the damn up And it really does come down to. We have exceeded our planet's longterm ecological carrying capacity every additional person we add to the planet incurs further ecological debt that will take generations to pay down but we can't even pay down until he bring the population down right to our long-term meek. Lots kathy and i'm more than happy to debate is three billion four five. I've i've dared anybody to try to tell me it's seven point seven or higher and nobody's even tried like even the people that you know want to try. They don't even try because they know they can't defend it. And so you know give or take a billion we've got a long road ahead on this issue but

PGA Royal Geographical Society Royal Society Europe UK Chris United States Kathy
Environmental organizations remain overwhelmingly white

Climate Connections

01:04 min | Last week

Environmental organizations remain overwhelmingly white

"From heat waves to flooding climate change. Disproportionately harms communities of color but among organizations working on climate solutions. When you look around the table at the decision makers what we are seeing is that the decision makers are not coming from those communities andres jimenez is executive director of green two point oh and initiative to increase diversity within the environmental movement every year it releases a report card assessing diversity within leading environmental organizations and foundations. He meant says that over the past few years diversity has increased slightly but most environmental groups remain overwhelmingly white especially at the leadership level. It is not a success. Organizations for example are hiring people of color but leaving them in those roles. There actually don't have voice so he says it's important to prioritize diversity in hiring. It's not only a matter of achieving greater equity jimenez it central to effectively addressing the growing climate crisis. What we need to bring to the table is different backgrounds different experiences so that we can accelerate change

Andres Jimenez Jimenez
Trump Administration Auctions Arctic National Wildlife Refuge To Oil Drillers

Environment: NPR

03:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump Administration Auctions Arctic National Wildlife Refuge To Oil Drillers

"And now a story you have missed. During last week's storming of the us capital. The trump administration achieved one of its biggest environmental reversals. It auctioned off leases to drill oil in alaska's arctic national wildlife refuge it's one of the country's most pristine places home to migrating caribou birds and polar bears but the sale was a bust degan hanlin of alaska's energy desk joins us now to explain welcome. Hi thanks for having me on. Thanks for being with us okay. So the trump administration has pushed for the sale for three years. I mean republicans have pushed to allow drilling in this refuge for decades. What exactly happened here. So the sale received a striking lack of interest as a former federal gas official told me it was a dry hole. A bust about half of the area up for leasing got no offers at all. No major oil companies submitted bids instead just two small companies each picked up one lease and the rest of them went to the state of alaska. There's a state owned economic development corporation here the highest bidder on nine leases. But what. I don't get the revenue. The refuge is thought to contain a lot of oil. Right so why wasn't there. More demand. well industry analysts have said there's multiple reasons a major one is the opposition to drilling in this place. There are ongoing lawsuits fighting. The trump administration's leasing program there filed by environmental groups. And the glitch. In which is an indigenous group that hunts the caribou that commonly give birth in the refuge. And they say. The leasing program is rushed legally flawed. There's also just the high cost of doing business in the arctic compared to say texas and there's the uncertainty about future oil demand and the changing presidential administration. Here's how larry personally former federal gas official for alaska put it betting your company and billions of dollars on oil in a high risk environment on the arctic. Besides for all the grief you're going to take from the public from shareholders from investors. That's a big gamble companies. Just don't have the appetite for that anymore and one more point money from this sale was meant to offset president. Trump's tax cuts back in two thousand seventeen but this sale will raise just a small fraction of the amount. The government had hoped okay so the industry didn't really show up. But you said the state of alaska actually stepped up since tapped into buy up leases. Would are they going to do with that. You think right so there's actually quite a bit of political support in alaska for drilling in the refuge. They say it's a way to create more state revenue more jobs so the basic idea. Is that the state buys these leases. Which last for ten years and can be renewed and it could just sit on them and wait for market conditions to improve and then it would have to partner with the oil industry to do that. Actual drilling okay. Well president-elect biden has said. He opposes drilling in the arctic refuge. Can you do anything about the leases. That have already been sold. It's not clear yet what we'll do. We know that. Normally lisa's could take months to finalise. But we expect the trump administration to try to rush them through before biden takes office when option is biting. Try to buy back those leases when he's an office though that's kind of unusual also. Once a company has an oil lease. They still have a lot of permits and approvals so industry analysts say a biden administration could hold up that permitting process and it's also still possible. A federal court could intervene teagan handling of alaska public media thank you.

Alaska Arctic National Wildlife Trump Administration Arctic Elect Biden Larry Arctic Refuge Donald Trump United States Texas Lisa Biden Biden Administration Teagan
Trader Joe's Seeds the Conversation About Plants & Plant-Based Products

Inside Trader Joe's

07:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Trader Joe's Seeds the Conversation About Plants & Plant-Based Products

"Plants and plant based products are certainly in these days. I remember the time when if you put the word vegan on a package it could actually hurt its sales. I swear there are things that we put the word vegan that afterwards. We're like what we do that because we killed it but maybe in the last five years in certainly more intensely in the last couple of years. We've seen this tremendous increase in customer interest for plant based foods. We have a new guest on the podcast today. I m amy. I am a category manager of a few different categories within our store deli fresh beverage and meet meatless an seafood in the frozen set. You head a lot of plant based things that are kind of obviously plant faced right like like the the juice shots for example you also manage what we call these meat analogues. The turkey lists protein patties and the protein patties. They don't say beef louis but there. That's kind of implied right. There has been huge growth in the meatless set. These new iterations of products are really going after the flexible -tarian customer and as people are looking for ways to have a healthier lifestyle improve their overall general health but then a better impact to the environment or incorporating meat. Free days meatless. Mondays in those sorts of things so these products really target customers that want the full meet experience but just a better version of it sweatshirt this as a better version of the full meet experience. Please don't i know it's implied. Did the two product types classic meat or now. New meatless does the product development sort of inform one category over the other. Like we gotta have a meatless bacon because we sell so much regular bacon or or does it work independent of what sells well in the traditional meet category. That's a great question. The new products that were developing our specific target to what does well in the meat or seafood set or chicken. For example i mean great tenders new sausage product that eats differently than our older or i should say first generation sausage links that we have. It wasn't that long ago when when we had to sort of change our expectations and we'd often wind up saying that's pretty good for vegan or vegetarian. Or an analog a stand in and now i feel like the products have changed to the point. Where oftentimes it's like. whoa. I wouldn't have known that was vegan. If you didn't tell me these days you see especially at fast. Food chains and in restaurants Like fried chicken. That actually looks like chicken. Sausage that eats tastes like sausage. It's gone beyond the burger to all those other food products that people normally crave And to get that texture in by it's really a lot more complicated than most people assume otherwise it tastes rubbery or it doesn't have that richness. doesn't cook the same to. That's been keep in mind that some of the proteins remain raw looking as opposed to really cooking and having the char in the grill so that you get that full experience not just the flavor the texture and the presentation of it. You don't have to give up your burger to have something plant based you can still enjoy those comfort foods. You just eat less calories or less fat for that occasion and you're doing something good for yourself and for the environment at the same time. Mimic mimic Animal based products. What's what sort of a holy grail product that you've not seen yet that that you're interested in in having developed bacon is one of them but then also a range of charcuterie. I have yet to really try anything that does well as far as texture and flavor. That's it's kind of more rubber which is a plant based material could could qualify fifteen years ago. I wasn't interested in picking up something that said vegan. Because experience told me it wasn't gonna taste very good. A great things taste good now. Oh they absolutely do. And even beyond just the meatless items the dips and dressings and whatnot with implant based cream cheese. I mean you would never know that you weren't eating a full cream. Cheese product tastes. It has the same mouth. Feel the same flavor profile the dips are at. That's an interesting topic because we've we've approved a number of them recently. Have i'm we're very excited to that. We have to zeki and a caramelized onion as well. That will launch in two thousand and twenty one and within panel. I wanna say everybody agreed that they actually tasted better or the same as a full dairy version. So you'd be hard pressed to differentiate them in a blind tasting. I don't think you could necessarily tell what else in the in the world of plant based stuff is top of mind for you or interesting things. You're looking forward to or. I'm looking to do more work on the seafood side. We don't have options yet within our stores for a plant based seafood product. But they're crabcakes out on the market or scallops ortona replacement so really looking more at the seafood to make sure that we've covered all of the proteins that customers are familiar with and bringing in the best versions of those. We have every single meal covered. We have breakfast options with links and patties we have burgers for lunch or even replacements for something as popular as our orange chicken so we've got a full spectrum so that you don't have to pick and choose which meal you can really incorporate it throughout your day or your week and really find what you're looking for ten years from now it will look completely different again know when you can mimic those flavors and textures. That people really love to have as part of their diet. Then they can feel freer to say okay. I'm going to have less meat in my diet. I'm not going to become a complete vegan vegetarian but maybe this day. I won't eat meat this day. I will absolutely. And i think it's becoming almost cool to say that you're you know you eat plant. Based that it's becoming more acceptable. More understood. people are trying new things so protein patties to sort of beef analog protein patties the texture is a little too soft for me for eating on a bun. Texture is a really big part of something being delicious or not Even though it's not flavor. I think one of our adams that we've really nailed on. Texture is the meatless meatballs. It's one of my family favorite items and we use it as a substitute spaghetti. All the time is just a way to swap something out. That's quick and easy you know and then add some shredded carrots and we've got plenty of plants and it's lower in fat and calories than the meat version that we sell as well and you would never know that you weren't eating meat. I think they're really great tasting meatballs. But you're not super focused on. Is it a perfect replication of the meat version. Because there's so many other flavors happening and the texture. I think to the point you just made the texture of those Meatless meatballs in the freezer. Case is perfect. They are perfectly meaty meatballs without without the meat. They're they're my personal favorite just the way you are

AMY Adams
What is Social Sustainability?

ECO CHIC

10:42 min | 2 weeks ago

What is Social Sustainability?

"Motivations for living ecoconscious lifestyle were pretty largely fuelled by climate change and climate action and environmental sustainability. Is kind of tricky. Let's first define it. Environmental sustainability can be pretty loosely defined as responsible interaction with the environment. Now what is responsible. That's different for different people but in my view environmental sustainability is conducting life in a way that inflicts minimal harm on the earth. And its natural resources now. I want to take a minute. Just acknowledge that. The word sustainability generally speaking. I think it's a little misleading because it truly just means the maintenance of an action sustainability when we look at like diet culture. Is your diet. Sustainable that means can you keep up with it. Indefinitely so sustainability is a weird word that we've attached to climate action because we don't actually want to sustain our society maintain business as usual. We want to do better. We want to decarbonise. We want to more aggressively achieve. Climate goals to ensure a stable planet so sustainability is really the bare minimum however in last year. We've really begun to open up the conversation around different kinds of sustainability and for good reason. I like to think about different kinds of sustainability kind of like circles that overlap in the middle of that ven diagram overlap. Portion can be environmental sustainability or perhaps more accurately when we're looking at society as a whole or community as a whole. we're looking at a pyramid. hierarchy of needs at the very base of that pyramid is social sustainability. Social sustainability is also pretty loosely defined because it manifest in a lot of other larger societal concerns essentially social sustainability looks at the societal structures in place that allow people to live healthy. Happy lives now. I know that sounds pretty big picture. But let's think about it. Social sustainability will look like things like equity diversity culture amenities so things like your social life type activities but also things like grocery stores job opportunities wellness and health safety community. engagement community. Engagement is one that i liked to talk about because a lot of climate action plans. Actually look at voter turnout looking at social sustainability because if people are active in their democracy. That's an indication that they care about where they live and they care about what's going to happen to it in the immediate future. If you really hide your pick of the litter it's not attractive to live somewhere with really severe inequity or really poor safety or no access to things like grocery stores. An area with these kinds of concerns would not be considered particularly socially sustainable because what incentive do people have to invest in communities that aren't actually invested in their own wellbeing and their livelihood hs. I mentioned job opportunities and someone out there may have perked up and like hey i think that might actually be economic. Sustainability economic sustainability is an interesting term because it can be both personal and societal. So for instance if you are buying a new car every year is that economically sustainable for you can you financially keep up with that but also is a society that relies on frivolous consumer spending economically sustainable. We saw this. During the pandemic people are generally more budget conscious and more inclined to save or maybe skip an extra non essential purchase. So how economically sustainable is it if there are entire industries relying on consumer spending. This is not necessarily saying that consumers shouldn't feel like they have to save a business. I'm talking about the necessity of consumers to spend on entire industries for their maintenance. So the example i'm thinking of is actually taxis about a year or so ago the daily which is the new york times daily. Podcast did a piece on taxis and taxi. Company had at the time opened up a suit against uber and ultimately there were some restrictions put on rideshare companies in new york city. But the bottom line. Was that a rideshare. Company was being seen as competition entering the marketplace. And it wasn't really on the city to protect taxis against consumer choice. That's the economy. That's supply and demand the model of taxis. Just waiting around wasn't economically sustainable. In that instance so the company is pivoted and maybe they lowered their rates or expanded their service areas or did something that allowed them to continue showing up as a worthy economic competitor. That's economic sustainability. Now let's go to job opportunities. Because i really liked this one. This again is a measure of social and economic sustainability. It is less attractive again to live somewhere without job opportunities or at least some reasonable access to job opportunities and public transportation to get you to those job opportunities and are those job opportunities reasonably profitable for you. Are people being paid fairly if someone needs to work two jobs to live somewhere. What does that say about minimum wage or the cost of living and favorite little sound line. One that i say all the time at work. And i've said it before on the show is that you cannot expect people to care about the solar panels. You're putting up in their neighborhood. If they can't pay their electric bill in the first place you are not meeting people's basic social and economic needs. They can't afford to care about the environment. Something we hear all the time when discussing healthy foods in sustainability and food access is the argument against fast food. So let's ask ourselves. Why do families by fast food on a weeknight for a meal. Well maybe it's preference. Maybe people just like it but also maybe it's time are they commuting and they don't have time to cook at home or is it budget because fast food is reasonably cheap when you're considering the cost of ingredients and groceries to make a comparable meal maybe it's access are they're reasonably good comparable options for them to eat out in their community or maybe they live in a food desert and don't have access good access to fresh produce and grocery stores if you're not addressing those issues of time and money and access who is going to listen to you when you're telling them that their hamburger requires the water equivalent of six months worth of showers or that a poor side cow lived their whole life in terrible. Awful slaughterhouse conditions. Just that they can enjoy a dollar menu hamburger. I mean maybe someone is going to be sympathetic in there. And say wow. I feel really bad. But that doesn't address their core issues of why they are choosing to make that decision in the first place that purchasing decision. Why are we not addressing the issue of time and money and access so another example. I wanted to skies which maybe a touchy one. But if you're listening to the show. I feel like i can reasonably assume that we share similar views on defunding. The police and the value in that studies have shown that an increase in active duty. Police officers does not have any significant impact on declining crime rates in an area. So let's talk crime. What types of situations may provoke someone to partake in crime. I don't know if that is the most correct wording but bear with me here. One thing that may drive someone to crime is money so let's talk. Money are their job. Opportunities are their job. Training programs for high schoolers are their educational opportunities and access to those training programs or transition programs and for people who are already working but just simply not making enough money. What does that say again about the minimum wage or how we value certain professions if the pandemic has taught us anything it's that the most essential workers in our society beyond of course our frontline healthcare are those employed in a trade or they're working in food food delivery they're cashiers or the people stocking the shelves. Oshawa barbara said this on our last episode when discussing the fashion industry if people at the top are billionaires and then the people at the bottom the garment maker is the people doing the most backbreaking work on the supply. Chain making pennies. That's a messed up system so bringing it back to crime. Let's get to the root issues. Let's address those social and economic concerns and issues that are driving people participate in it in the first place. Another fun fact. Random example that i learned in the classic city planning book. The death and life of american cities is that street lights and the length of city blocks are really good indicators of crime rates so if there is less light there's less opportunity for a nighttime crime. If you have a longer blocked have less alleyway less opportunity for crime outside of the public eye. And where do you have long blocks. And where do you have a lot of street lights in the suburbs. Not all the time course. But it's a good way to kind of guesstimate crime rates in an area when you think about a bad neighborhood quote unquote what do you think of its poorly lit. There's a lot of alleyways maybe in the scene that you're having in your head and that's also about city budgets and planning and money and time and access. So what are we funding instead of job training programs and education and social services that for these conditions to kind of perpetuate and kind of sink in to the societal structure in that community. So we've been talking about crime for while. But i would like to zoom out and bring this conversation back to the idea of social sustainability meaning that people's basic needs for living stable lives needs to be met before they have the privilege to care about climate change and environmental action and how their daily lives are impacting the planet. We can't tell everyone that amazon is bad and they need to stop shopping there without replacing that with a similarly low cost option or similar accessible option. What's getting to their house in two days are what's immediately available in their neighborhood. Ultimate social sustainability would be a society that conducts business and economic activities that protects both people and the planet when we're looking at environmental sustainability. We want to make sure that people have the means to care about it. Not just financially. I don't want to say that in order to be truly environmentally. Sustainable you need to be buying from. Environmental companies are environmentally backed companies. But that's to say that you have the capacity to care. You're not worried about larger more basic necessities to live stable healthy happy life. I also think this is a really good place to plug intersectional

New York Times Daily Oshawa Barbara New York City Amazon
Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

"The us produces so much shale gas it needs to find new markets overseas. The trump administration has approved moving a liquefied form of the gas by rail. But some say that is too dangerous. Susan phillips of member station. whyy reports on a route. That would be one of the longest in the country. The guests will go first to a new plant in northeast. pennsylvania where refrigeration units will chill it too negative two hundred and sixty degrees fahrenheit. That's how it goes from a guest to a liquid. The part of the plan that scares a lot of people is the transport two hundred miles by truck or rail through some of the most densely populated areas of the east coast to a planned export terminal in new jersey. Vanessa keegan lives nearby with her family including three year old. Theo thank you want to take a picture. Okay you gotta get mommy ipad. We take another picture right. Era go railcars. Full of highly flammable liquefied natural gas or lng would roll about a block and a half away from keegan's home a daycare center sits right at the company gate so they want special permits to transport them right there. That train track. You could skip on down to in about a minute and a half and that terrifies me. This project is part of a larger push to export natural gas last summer. The trump administration changed long-standing federal policy to allow rail transport of ellen g anywhere in the country fifteen states including pennsylvania and new jersey challenged the move saying it puts people's lives at risk in this rust belt reason of new jersey. The export project does have support from building trade unions and powerful state lawmakers including assemblyman. John bursa kelly. He says grandfather worked at a former dupont plant on the site of the planned export terminal. That's will create jobs as it once did contribute to tax base as wants to be an important economic driver for people to make a living in fear families. I says safety issues should be raised and addressed but he says railcars carry much more hazardous materials through the region every day. Ray mentzer is a chemical engineer at purdue university who spent his career on ellen g projects for exxon mobil he says specially designed containers have a good safety record but he says transporting the guests through densely populated areas increases the risk if there's a leak. It's not flammable until it's vaporized but it's going to bait rise pretty damn quickly and then it's going to seek an ignition source. Believe me it will find an ignition source. Pretty darn readily mentor says. A vapor cloud would definitely catch fire. If i was at a town meeting and i lived there i would want to know. Just what routes are you going to us right now. The exact roots are unclear. Multiple attempts to reach the developers of the project. New fortress energy went on answered if the overseas export terminal gets built. None of the guests will go to power new jersey homes instead the state is planning a large coastal wind farm off atlantic city to help new jersey reach the goal of all clean energy by twenty fifty

Susan Phillips Ellen G Vanessa Keegan New Jersey Whyy Pennsylvania John Bursa Kelly Theo Keegan East Coast Ray Mentzer Dupont United States Exxon Mobil Purdue University Atlantic City
Century-old Michigan home produces more energy than it uses

Climate Connections

01:19 min | 11 hrs ago

Century-old Michigan home produces more energy than it uses

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in two thousand. Six macro coffee bought a century old house. In ann arbor michigan. It had a south facing roof big windows and heart pine floors dream house but it lacked insulation the windows lead and a fifty year old furnace. Chugged away all winter long. We had to put buckwheat pillows heated up in the microwave. Stuff down at the bottom of the bed to stay warm at night and then we would get the utility bill and it was like three hundred and fifty bucks a month grow. Cough was determined to reduce energy waste and cut carbon pollution. He installed a geothermal heating and cooling system and rooftop solar panels and replaced appliances added insulation and installed storm windows all while preserving the homes original character and meeting historic preservation standards in twenty fifteen the international living future institute certified grow costs home as net zero energy meaning it produces as much energy as it uses. Its the oldest house in the country to that certification. And we're looking forward to giving up that crown because he says to limit climate change. It's necessary to cut carbon pollution from all homes including the ones that have been around for generations.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Ann Arbor Michigan International Living Future In Cough
What's Next For The U.S. After Rejoining The Paris Climate Agreement

Environment: NPR

04:26 min | 1 d ago

What's Next For The U.S. After Rejoining The Paris Climate Agreement

"Hours after being sworn in last week president biden took his first official steps to address climate change he revoked a permit for controversial oil pipeline and rejoin the paris climate agreement which the trump administration had withdrawn from to talk about the shift. What more to expect. We're joined now by nathan rot. A member of npr's climate team good morning. Good morning so. Let's start with the big headline rejoining the paris climate agreement significant in principle. But does it really mean anything. Yeah me look at the. Us isn't on the outside looking in when it comes to international efforts to stave off you know catastrophic climate change. So that's pretty significant. Nearly two hundred countries signed onto the paris accord which aims to limit global warming to a. Let's say quasi may be manageable level and the us is the only country that had withdrawn from that and the irony is that the us was one of the key architects in making the agreement. Back in two thousand fifteen. Here's shiloh raghav. Who's with the environmental group conservation. International the four years of of reversals rollbacks and united states having neglected or abdicated its its role or responsibility in addressing climate. Change definitely had a negative impact on the kind of global motivation and pace of action on climate. Change that's why she says you know. Having biden rejoined the agreement on his first day in office is so meaningful clear signal to the rest of the world that the us is serious about addressing climate change again and that's important of course because the us can sort of leverage its own power to help move other countries along like china and india. That's important on a sort of global level. But what does it mean for me new so honestly not that much at least not in expecting that. Okay we're not entirely sure what strategies by is actually going to use to try to cut greenhouse gas emissions. We know that he's likely to invest money. In renewable energy sources. He may toughen efficiency standards for appliances. You know your refrigerator fuel economy standards for the nation. Cars will likely go up but all of that stuff is gonna take time and that change is going to be gradual so the place where you might see a little more immediate impact you know if you work in the oil and gas industry or the coal industry. Yeah in places like texas. How's that playing out. Well so you know earlier. This week biden followed. Through with one of his boldest campaign promises which was to stop all new oil and gas leasing and permitting on federal waters land so in texas. It doesn't have as much of an impact but let's say wyoming new mexico colorado states with a lot of federal land. There's a really big impact. Now the stop is really only more of a positive temporary it only sixty days and it's only for new leasing and permiting given the depressed price of oil. It won't have much of a huge near term impact. There's not a lot of investment happening. But a number of environmental groups and progressive parts of the democratic party. Want to see that band become permanent. Which would cause more of a stir. Roughly a quarter of the country's entire greenhouse gas emissions come from fossil fuels that are extracted from public lands. So putting a halt to that practice could potentially bring emissions down long term thing is it would also hurt economies in some of those states that i mentioned like wyoming and new mexico or alaska. Who's economy's really depend on that kind of extractive industry. Yeah and i guess we're already hearing a lot of pushback from fossil fuel companies and those dates absolutely and if the moratorium ends up running longer than sixty days if it becomes permanent it will undoubtedly get challenge in court. That said what biden is doing. This first week is not as controversial as everybody might think shell. Exxon the american petroleum institute all of them supported the us rejoin the paris climate agreement. And that's because there's an understanding outside of some parts of the fossil fuel industry and the republican party that actions do need to be taken to limit global warming. There's an understanding that actions will be taken to address global warming and i've talked to some who work with the ra- longside fossil fuel companies. Who think that might be in their best interest to be part of those conversations rather than just being the subject of them in with biden being known as a moderate now might be a good time for them to take to that table. That's npr's nathan rowe. Thank you very much thank you.

President Biden Paris Nathan Rot United States Shiloh Raghav Biden NPR Wyoming Texas New Mexico India China Democratic Party Colorado American Petroleum Institute Alaska Exxon Republican Party Nathan Rowe
Birding

PODSHIP EARTH

07:12 min | 1 d ago

Birding

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like

Guana Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada California Bert
How Biden Administration Plans To Navigate Challenging Topic Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 3 d ago

How Biden Administration Plans To Navigate Challenging Topic Of Climate Change

"After four years of the trump administration denying climate change and prioritizing fossil fuel development. President biden's first few days already mark a stark shift in federal environmental policy. The biden team has announced a slew of policy actions including a temporary ban on new oil and gas leasing on public lands for more on that. Let's bring nathan rowe from. Npr's climate team. Hello there good afternoon. Good afternoon to you. So us through these changes for oil and gas development on public lands. What exactly was the announcement. So this is one of the boldest promises that biden made on the campaign trail and it was won. A lot of folks were kind of anxiously waiting to see if he'd follow through with it could be seen as kind of a litmus test. Let's say for how serious he's going to be about addressing the climate crisis. And so what he's doing is he's going to pas. New mineral extraction and development on public lands for sixty days can significant because roughly a quarter of all of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions come from fossil fuels extracted from public land but those fossil fuels also generates revenue for states and local economies. Especially here in the west so politically. It could be seen as being pretty politically fraught. Yeah okay so a pause sixty days but that is obviously more than enough to draw pushback from the oil and gas industry. I'm wondering what about states that have profited from that industry. Yeah well they've definitely been some of the most vocal critics of this thus far study out of the university wyoming that took place about a month ago. Found that this type of ban if it was made permanent which is what a lot of people in the environmental groups and some parts of the democrat. Party wanna see it could cost eight western states. Eight billion dollars in tax revenues wyoming. Being the hardest hit. I talked to a land. Surveyor named kevin imus who does a lot of work with the oil and gas companies. Wyoming's powder river basin yesterday. And he said he expects his move to cause a lot of investment in even existing fossil fuel projects to dry up. Your back is going to disappear. Why would you invest in something they just know is not doesn't have stronghold to make you money so our economy is going to suffer tremendously now. There are two really important caveat here one. There wasn't a lot of new investment already happening in oil and gas because the pandemic has dropped the price of oil so so dramatically in to this won't have any impact on fossil fuel production on private land. Which is where the vast majority of oil and gas comes from in the us. Okay unimportant Caveat there the last four years we have heard a lot about the trump administration opening up parts of the country to oil and gas leasing. I'm thinking the arctic national wildlife refuge being the most recent does this order impact. That does it offset those actions so this has been interesting and the answer is yes and no so before. He announces larger moratorium biden announced to hold on lease sales in the arctic. National wildlife refuge on day one. But you're hitting on an important point. Which is that you know the ways. The trump administration boosted gas are going to have lasting effects. Here's john les who worked at the interior department under the clinton and carter administrations. I mean the trump administration basically conducted a kind of a fire sale on federal oil and gas leases and what they sold was just sort of bought by people for peanuts putting stuff in the stockpile matured so the oil and gas industry have this massive inventory of leases that they're already sitting on thanks to the trump administration which makes this moratorium less impactful than it would otherwise be real quick nate. What about moves related to climate change. Rejoining the paris climate agreement stopping the keystone excel pipeline. Which you read on those well. It means it biden isn't just gonna talk when it comes to climate change. He's gonna walk the walk. We had a sense of that when he got elected stuff who he nominated to agencies. But we're seeing that. This was a day one priority. And it's going to be a big priority for his administration going forward and pr's nathan rod. Thank you thank you.

Biden President Biden Nathan Rowe Kevin Imus Wyoming NPR Powder River Basin John Les Carter Administrations Arctic National Wildlife Refug National Wildlife Refuge Interior Department Arctic Clinton United States Nate Paris Nathan Rod
Study links hotter weather and lower student test scores

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 d ago

Study links hotter weather and lower student test scores

"When the weather's hot it can be hard to concentrate and learn and research suggests that as the number of hot days increases student achievement suffer the adverse effects appear to accumulate over time. It's almost like a death by a thousand little cuts. Ji-sung park is an assistant professor at the university of california los angeles his team examined standardized test scores from twelve thousand. Us school districts of seven years. They also looked at local temperature data for each district. They found that in years when a school had more holidays than normal average test scores declined but the drop affected some demographic groups more than others. The effective heat on learning appears to be far more pronounced for low income students as well as for underrepresented minority so african american hispanic students. One reason for the disparity is that schools in low income areas often lack air conditioning. So park says that as the climate warms the inequity in education could grow but on the flip side our study also suggests that investments such a school air conditioning could prevent a lot of that adverse impact and help students concentrate on their studies instead of the heat

Sung Park JI University Of California Los Angeles United States
Book update reflects climate change impact on Minnesota

Climate Cast

04:17 min | 3 d ago

Book update reflects climate change impact on Minnesota

"Climate cast is supported by bank of america. Financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs bank of america. Na member fdic new book tracks minnesota's changing landscape. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hunter here with climate cast as the climate changes sodas minnesota's landscape the second edition of minnesota's natural heritage out this month documents. Those changes over the past twenty five years john. Morality is a co author and senior manager of wildlife for three rivers park district. Hi john welcome to climate cast. Good afternoon call. Why is now a good time to update this book. Well there's been a lot of changes over the last twenty five years whether it's climate population conservation efforts within minnesota so we just felt it was time to keep it fresh for the next twenty five years as far as climate. The book documents. What all of us are seeing with the weather records. That minnesota is about three degrees warmer and three inches wetter overall. Since eighteen ninety-five but climate change is not even across minnesota. What are some of the regional differences that stand out well. it's always been hotter and stickier in the southern part of the state. Now they're getting tremendous summer humidity's up north partially because of change in the weather but also change in our use of climate by having all the cornfields out there that are helping put more moisture into the air Ice levels are changing. We still have really good ice conditions north but down south now. The temperatures aren't enough to put down good ice so it does vary. Let's talk about that humidity for a second. Because we talk about corn sweat in the summer where that evapotranspiration puts that additional moisture from the soil into the atmosphere. You're finding that those humidity levels are wafting into northern minnesota more frequently. Is that right. Yeah more western minnesota not so much up into the forested area of the arrowhead but you get up into the red river valley as temperatures warm up question is getting planted further and further north. So that's just helping to increase the humidity levels. Which should people be looking forward to see. Climate change in minnesota. One thing is the movement of certain plants. I mean we're getting plants that are moving further north some of the animals movements. I mean we're seeing things like opossums. You know move up into areas of central north central minnesota twenty five years ago. They were only scarcely found in the southern part of the state. Birds like cardinals are way up in northern minnesota. Now they used to be a lot more migratory further south some of the negative things. We're seeing One of the impacts are invasive species. We always used to think that minnesota was safer because all the the bad plants and animals with diaz in the winter. They're not doing that now. So those are some things to look for john. The book looks back at the last twenty five years. How about looking ahead. How do current trends suggest. Minnesota's landscape will look in the next twenty five years we talk about changes in moisture one of the things in super important paper about ten years ago. Showing that you know over the projections are that are conditions over the next twenty. Five years are going to shift to be more like central kansas. So it's going to be warmer and a little bit drier in more drought conditions. So we should expect that. We're going to have more shifted grass areas savanna habitats moving into northern minnesota. That's interesting the kansas reference. The wizard of oz. I'm thinking of. We're not in kansas city more but maybe in minnesota we will be right right. The book is the second edition of minnesota's natural heritage. There's a book launch online event tonight at seven o'clock co author john moriarty. Thanks so much for your perspective today. You're welcome that's climate cast. I'm npr chief meteorologist paul.

Minnesota Jobs Bank Of America Paul Hunter John Bank Of America Fdic NPR Red River Valley Cardinals Diaz Kansas Kansas City John Moriarty Paul
Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

Environment: NPR

03:40 min | 4 d ago

Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

"Now president biden isn't just focusing on the pandemic one of the first things. He did after his inauguration. Yesterday was to cancel a permit to build the keystone excel pipeline that pipeline would transported crude oil from alberta to the texas gulf coast would have entered the us in montana from their yellowstone. Public radio's kayla roche reports on the mixed reaction to the cancellation tribes and environmental groups. Here and in other states the pipeline would have crossed have been fighting the keystone excel pipeline in court for roughly a decade last year in a video by indigenous collective buffalo defense. Roughly ten for pet tribal members protested in northern montana. They lined up with their hands held up fists and repeated a lakota phrase. That's become slogan. For the movement against pipelines like the dakota access pipeline keystone excel. Johnny were drawing. Water is life. The canadian company behind keystone xl tc energy operates a pipeline which spilled thousands of gallons of oil in south dakota and twenty seventeen and in north dakota in nine thousand hundred activists and tribal members say the pipeline endangers water-quality bricks tribal land treaties and pipeline. Construction brings the threat of human trafficking. Biden's decision to revoke a presidential permit. Donald trump granted canadian developer energy in two thousand nineteen puts a heart stop to the billion dollar project. Among those celebrating was fort belknap indian community council president. Andy work a member of the onny tribe. I'm just really happy. I'm really happy. And i'm really thankful in south dakota the rosebud sioux tribal government. Join fort belknap. In suing to stop the pipeline. Rosebud sioux president rodney bordeaux was busy coordinating cove nineteen vaccinations. When he heard biden cancelled. The permit agreed victory. Hopefully that's the end of it but will continue to fight it we're gonna watch it but pipelines supporters are seeing the collapse of ten years of work. Tc energy which declined to comment for the story. Released a statement in anticipation of the permit cancellation yesterday and said it. Suspending further activity on the pipeline county commissioners in rural northeastern montana where agriculture is the dominant industry said they had been looking forward to the tax revenue which the state estimated at sixty three million dollars. A year extremely disappointed mary. Armstrong a commissioner in montana's valley county where very large county with very few people seems like a perfect place in Perfectly compatible with us montana. Republicans strongly criticized by an institution. But keep an excel has also been supported by democrats here. Including former governor steve bullock and senator jon tester yesterday tester said he still supports the development of the pipeline but with conditions he had encouraged the biden administration to meet with supporters and opponents before making a decision while the pipeline from alberta looks dead for now the premier of that province jason kenney yesterday pushed for consequences the canadian province of alberta invest in one point. Five billion dollars in the project in a statement. Yesterday kenny culver biden and prime minister justin trudeau to discuss the decision. However the us government refuses to open the door to a constructive and respectful dialogue about these issues that it is clear that the government of canada impose meaningful trade and economic sanctions to defend our country's vital economic interest canadian prime minister justin trudeau in a statement expressed. Disappointment invite is decision but acknowledged biden's choice to fulfil a promise. He made during his campaign run

Texas Gulf Coast Kayla Roche Northern Montana Montana Keystone Xl Tc Energy Biden Fort Belknap Indian Community South Dakota Rosebud Sioux Tribal Governmen Fort Belknap Rosebud Sioux Rodney Bordeaux Alberta Donald Trump Buffalo North Dakota Dakota Johnny
Massachusetts Voters Share Their Hopes For New Administration

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 5 d ago

Massachusetts Voters Share Their Hopes For New Administration

"Oh i don't need to tell you that. In this divided nation there are widely divergent emotions around today's transition of power. Npr's tovia smith has been out speaking to voters in massachusetts. She joins us now. Two of you hi there. Where were you exactly. I was in deep blue cambridge a a liberal bastion as you may know that Basically tied for biden's biggest vote in massachusetts around ninety two percent so As you can imagine. I encountered many elated self-described lefties here I started at harvard. Square institution restaurant called grendel where they had a big biden banner hanging in a big screen setup to watch the ceremony I talked to owner kerry cooled sir and server abby taylor. They were serving up what they advertised as cups of joe to warm your insides like the president they said and to celebrate as they watched and they said they were surprised even themselves how emotional it was as as you can hear giddy to see a mom you mean in a leadership role like this. I mean it's like it's it's really happening. They said it was as much a relief to see the now. Former president trump go as it was to see biden inaugurated and both women actually started out supporting senator elizabeth. Warren who's a cambridge neighbor. But taylor says biden has grown her getting into this fight has actually like enliven tim. He's so much more energetic and like sharp and sort of exciting than he was at the beginning of the campaign. I think think that's to me something that i really admire. People that can grow. You know what. I mean and this being cambridge i'll just add. I also heard from voters who were still disappointed with biden. They see as not progressive enough but as one hooded resigned to settling for him. Okay so you met a lot of people who like biden who white kamala harris in deep blue cambridge. What do they say. They actually hope for what they want. The new administration to do a lot of hope that a harris biden harris administration will do better on protecting the environment for example on managing the pandemic More generally on improving the tenor from the white house. many said they were relieved that there was nothing today like the violence we saw at the capital. Two weeks ago But ultimately susan far. Who's a harvard government professor says. She hopes that without trump at the top stoking his false claims of election fraud that extremism and division will dissipate. And it's troubling. But i'm hoping that as we move forward. And we sort of normalize that gradually some of this alternative reality that they have been living in will lose credibility. Did you run into any trump supporters. Today to of you. yes i did. And i wasn't surprised. When this navy veteran i spoke to greg said. He didn't want his last name used for fear of retribution or being canceled as he put it He said he was purposely avoiding watching the inauguration. I love this country in love what this country stands for. But it's just not home anymore. It's just sad. He says he fears a coming. A big government approach and a foreign policy that does not put america first but he says he is praying for the president and the vice president because he says they are his president and vice president now too is. Npr's tovia smith reporting for four us from cambridge. Today thanks to of you. Thank you and the program elsewhere in the program. We're gonna hear from americans in other parts of the country reacting to this change in america's leadership.

Biden Tovia Smith Cambridge Square Institution Restaurant Abby Taylor Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Grendel NPR Harris Biden Harris Harvard Government Harvard Kerry Kamala Harris Warren JOE Taylor TIM White House
Biden's Plan To Undo Trump's Last-Minute Deregulatory Spree & Enact A Climate Agenda

Environment: NPR

02:46 min | 5 d ago

Biden's Plan To Undo Trump's Last-Minute Deregulatory Spree & Enact A Climate Agenda

"This is fresh air. I'm terry gross. The drama fear and security concerns surrounding. Today's inauguration and the shock of the january. Sixth insurrection have consumed the attention of so many americans. Meanwhile more quietly in the background the trump administration went on with the washington post describes as a spree of environmental rollbacks of rules affecting oil and gas drilling mining and logging along with energy efficiency and standards and restrictions on toxic chemicals trump finalized more than two dozen energy and environmental policies since he lost the election. Joe biden has said he's planning a series of executive actions starting on day one to undo trump administration environmental policies. Our guest juliet. Eilperin is a senior national affairs correspondent at the washington post focusing on climate and the environment. She was part of a team at the post that won a pulitzer prize last year for reporting on climate change. She's been reporting on the regulatory changes trump enacted at the agencies that oversee the environment and public land's alpern has also been following biden's plans regarding the environment and climate change and is related staffing choices including the new position of special presidential envoy on climate change position to be filled by john kerry and his senior director for environmental justice. Juliet eilperin is also the author of the two thousand six book fight club politics how partisanship is poisoning. The house of representatives. We recorded our interview. Yesterday juliet eilperin welcome to fresh air. So trump finalize more than two dozen energy and environmental policies since he lost the election. What are few of the most significant policy changes just since the election. One of the biggest ones was a for example the auctioning off of drilling leases to extract gas from the coastal plain of the arctic. National wildlife. refuge. That happened on january sex the same day as the capital seige and so it really didn't get that much attention from the public at that point even though there's been a four decade long fight over whether to protect this huge area which is home to a host of wildlife sacred to indigenous people but also a vast reservoir of oil and gas then. They're you know. Incredibly detailed but significant rules such as energy efficiency standards for the home furnaces and water heaters that we use to stay warm during the winter at the request of the gas industry.

Eilperin Washington Post Terry Gross Alpern Juliet Eilperin Joe Biden Pulitzer Prize Biden John Kerry House Of Representatives Arctic
Climate Change Concerns Prompt Americans To Consider Relocating

Environment: NPR

03:26 min | 5 d ago

Climate Change Concerns Prompt Americans To Consider Relocating

"Climate change could prompt millions of americans to relocate in decades to come rising temperatures and rising seas will alter conditions in some places and some people have already moved. Here's new hampshire. Public radio's any row. Pick the mountain west felt like home for judith and doug sahm until recently they lived outside of reno nevada it was With a view of the sierra that was just to die for you know a lot of friends musician friends. We get together and play music with them. It wasn't easy. Leave at the soames had long thought about retiring to colorado or montana to be near family but as they started making those plans several years ago they were also noticing a new problem. Wildfire season was getting worse and longer and they're part of the country due to climate. Change for me. It was unbearable because was sensitive to smoke. That i started to swell up. I get sinus infections and Going outside intolerable. The psalms did end up moving but not in the west. They settled on northern new england and a house in a rural town at the foot of new hampshire's white mountains. Doug says they call themselves climate migrants. We had the idea that not necessarily that we were going to a place that would be forever untouched by climate change but we were getting out of a bad climate situation. That was only to get worse. Research suggests that climate related hazards could soon play a role in prompting millions of americans and people worldwide to relocate. Joa bata studies this at portland state university in oregon payments might be the new normal for many of us. And so the idea that you know you have to leave in one place forever. I think people have to forget that. But she says all this moving around can make people more resilient and if the places that will receive them can be resilient and flexible too. They might just benefit from it. Well we've talked about climate migration. It usually comes up within the context of the jobs that we just can't fill. Sarah merchant is community development director in nashua new hampshire. It's already seen its puerto. Rican population grow after hurricane. Maria and it expects more climate migrants from boston and other nearby coastal areas. I think the city is well positioned with the infrastructure already have and teach in that is very desirable by some measures. National was region could be an ideal climate haven. It's getting warmer but doesn't face the existential threats of safe florida or california. Northern new england is also one of the oldest and whitest parts of the country and has struggled with population loss. But it's hard to predict the scale and timing of climate migration and an influx of newcomers during the pandemic is showing just how disruptive unplanned growth can be so marsh says nashua is keeping migration and other climate impacts in mind while tackling existing problems with affordable housing and overstretched infrastructure. Should make sure that what we are building sustainable. We also have to be smarter about what we do. Have whether or not the climate migrants come. She says nashua is improvement that will benefit everyone for npr news. I'm anne rubik a version of this story. First aired on new hampshire. Public radio's podcast outside in.

Doug Sahm New Hampshire Joa Bata Soames Judith Reno Sarah Merchant White Mountains New England Nevada Montana Portland State University Nashua Colorado Doug Oregon Hurricane Maria Boston Florida
UKs National Health Service plans to eliminate contribution to climate change

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 5 d ago

UKs National Health Service plans to eliminate contribution to climate change

"To climate change and intern. Climate change can make health problems like asthma and heart disease worse. Everywhere you look. You can see climate change undermining or threatening to undermine the foundations of health. Dr nick watts is the chief. Sustainability officer of the united kingdom's national health service. The nhl intends to become the world's first national health system to eliminate its contribution to climate change. It recently pledged to make its operations carbon neutral by the year. Twenty forty and its supply chain carbon-neutral five years later. Achieving the goal will require making buildings more efficient reducing waste and providing care closer to people's homes so they don't need to travel so far the nhs even plans to develop a zero emissions. Ambulance watt says. These efforts are essential high quality care public health patient. Kid doesn't just stop the full goals of the hospital but it expands across the broader determinants of health and all of those are improved when you respond to climate change in a row. Boston accelerated way Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication to hear more

Dr Nick Watts National Health Service Heart Disease Asthma NHL United Kingdom NHS Watt Boston Center For Environmental Commu
Lizards and snakes will feel global warmings effects

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 6 d ago

Lizards and snakes will feel global warmings effects

"Animals like polar bears make headlines because of the threats they face from climate change. But there's so many other animals and plants that are just overlooked or not considered by most of the public. I think reptiles one of groups. David pilat is an ecologist at the us geological survey in boise idaho. He says that because lizards and snakes are cold blooded animals. They're sensitive to temperature changes. His ongoing research suggests that as the climate warms. Their geographic ranges will likely shift. What we're finding is that there's a number of species that are going to be moving northward or moving up in elevation for example. A snake called the northern rubber boa which lives mostly in the northwestern u. s. as the climate warms. Its habitat in the. Us may shrink. It may be able to move farther into canada but whether the animal can get there is a whole 'nother thing because of roads and cities and other types of fragmentation or barriers says. It's important to predict where species survive in the future. So wildlife managers can prepare now and take steps to protect even the scaly slithery ones.

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Advocate and scholar Beverly Wright wants justice at center of climate policies

Climate Connections

01:27 min | Last week

Advocate and scholar Beverly Wright wants justice at center of climate policies

"Org. i'm dr anthony. Leiserowitz and this is climate connections burning. Fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide and other air pollutants that can worsen asthma and other illnesses. But not all people are equally at risk. Black americans are more likely to live near polluting facilities and as the climate changes. Many black communities are also vulnerable to increasingly extreme weather so everything has been exacerbated. Beverly right is founder of the deep south center for environmental justice and co chair of the national black environmental justice network. she's also a survivor of hurricane katrina and she says rebuilding after the storm was difficult. That's racist practices that had been in existence for years. House in a black neighborhood was worth less than saying house in a white neighborhood. And so since our houses had been devalued the amount of money would given to assist in rebuilding. Our houses was far less than what white people got. The problem was the amount of money that it costs to rebuild. The house was insane whether you live in a white neighborhood black neighborhood intersecting environmental economic and health burdens disproportionately impact people of color. So right says racial justice must be at the center of climate policies. Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit. Climate action's dot

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Beth Gardiner: What Are The Consequences Of Breathing Dirty Air?

Environment: NPR

08:32 min | Last week

Beth Gardiner: What Are The Consequences Of Breathing Dirty Air?

"It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm newsom roti and on the show today breath. I don't think there's anything more fundamental to life than breathing you know. I can't think of any other activity that if you stopped doing it for a few minutes. You're finished it's literally. The definition of being alive right or not being alive is that you're not breathing. This is beth gardner. She's an environmental journalist. I am the author of choked life and breath in age verification. We've all heard that. Dirty air affects our lungs and hearts but beth has spent the last few years reporting on new research research that shows how may have longer term effects on our health and even damage our brains and it's not surprising who is most at risk one thing that is really clear about air. Pollution is that it really intersects with all the preexisting fractures in our society. It is still a problem that breaks along. Lines of economic inequality and racial injustice like in houston texas specifically a neighborhood called manchester next to fifty two miles of oil refineries the largest petrochemical complex in the us so houston is also a port city and the ships coming in and out all the trucks and things that are associated with that are also highly polluting. So the neighborhood of manchester is just really bearing a disproportionate bryant of air pollution and obviously the health. Consequences of this are devastating. As part of her work bath has interviewed. Local community activists. There like yvette are a yano. If were to come into tear community into my apartment they would be shocked at the fact that you know between three and five in the morning. They're going to be hit with. These extremely pungent smells that can go everything from an extremely like saccharin. Super sweet smell that unnatural to smelling burning basketballs and sneakers because a lot of the facilities are actually plastic producing resin producing facilities. So you never know what you're going to get hit with so from the time that we wake up to the time our head hits our pillow you could be easily sitting inside you know having dinner and get hit with these smells and the smells can obviously impact direct health. so my nephew. He was born with asthma. Asthma continues to be a problem. You know and upper respiratory issues. Continue to be a problem in our family. No i myself. Struggle with reproductive health issues and skin rashes. That's the reality for a lot of mothers and children and just parents guardians general like a simple act of going to the park can be cancelled. By shrunk fumes emitting from down the waterway it can be feeling sick. You know having headaches the need to throw up while you're walking down the street to go. Get a nice t. They can mean that. You are barricaded in your home. Because there is a chemical disaster of flare and explosion at a facility which happens a lot more often than what people think and in. Those occasions were locked in our homes. And it's ridiculous even if you don't live near an oil refinery just walking down a busy city street or going to school next to a highway can increase your chances of all kinds of health problems. Here's beth gardner on the ted stage. I would have been pretty ready to believe that. Dirty air could trigger asthma attacks and other breathing problems to which shocked me was how much further the effects. Actually go. The evidence is overwhelming. Scientists have linked air pollution to increase rates of heart attacks strokes many kinds of cancer. Dementia parkinson's disease miscarriages premature birth. And much more one at particularly vivid study really dangerous home for me. A neuropathologist examined puppies. Who'd lived in badly polluted mexico city. She found the same markers in their brains that doctors use to diagnose alzheimer's disease in humans plaques twisted proteins degenerating neurons. Dogs youth made the discovery particularly disturbing the same research team examined the brains of children and young people who'd been killed in accidents. They found the red flags of alzheimer's in the brains of forty percent of those who'd lift in polluted places and none who'd briefs cleaner air there are other ways to see pollution's effects on the brain to the researchers gave cognitive tests to kids and found that those who had lived with dirty air and also carried a gene for alzheimer's had short term memory loss and iq's ten points lower than their peers. Well that is just shocking. I wonder if you could talk more about the people who live in in these most polluted cities how their everyday lives are affected. There's tons of research that finds that actually in heavily polluted neighborhoods. That parents are going to end up missing. More work and kids are going to end up missing more school because you know if your kid has asthma attack. You need to deal with that. And if it's serious you need to see a doctor or maybe go to the hospital so on top of the health effects of that. That's an educational impact rate if the child has to miss school that's an economic impact or maybe even a potential job loss if the parent has to miss too much work so it really is not only a matter of health but also manner of just everyday quality of life. Yeah is there a growing sense. I mean thanks of course to people like you. Who do the work that you do. But is there a growing sense that or acknowledgement that. This is happening your like. Is this something that is mainstream. Now i mean i think we understand it a little more maybe as a public than we used to but i would say that. I still don't think that the public awareness is up there in sync with actually the impact. You know seven million people annually dying around the world up to one hundred thousand deaths every year in the united states. You know i mean one thing. That's interesting actually. Is that when the air gets cleaner when we do the things to reduce pollution and clean it up. The health benefits materialize almost immediately. And that's pretty powerful. That is pretty powerful. I guess so. I want to know. What would you like to see happen next. Then how do we demand better air quality. Does it mean buying more electric cars if we can afford to do so or or taking more companies to court over emissions. Well it's a lot of things so there's not. There's not one cause of air pollution rate but what it basically comes down to and the thing that has gotten us as far as we have come which is really very far already has been science-based regulation and effective enforcement. That's what works no individual no smaller entity besides our government or governments have the power to check corporate pollution right to tell volkswagen you need to make your cars comply with the law to tell exxon or some big oil company. You know you need to make sure your refineries are complying with pollution limits and. Here's the pollution limit that has been set in accordance with public health demands. Not dollars and cents demand so we're talking about regulation and holding governments accountable and that makes me think Back to yvette vet story which we heard earlier. Yvette actually testified before congress in two thousand eighteen

Beth Gardner Newsom Roti Manchester Alzheimer Houston Asthma Attack Heart Attacks Strokes Dementia Parkinson's Disease M NPR Yvette Beth Asthma Texas Headaches Mexico City United States Cancer
New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

Climate Cast

03:51 min | Last week

New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

"2021 brings a new president and new priorities for climate change solutions. How quickly can the. Us pivot toward a cleaner. Climate policy penn state university professor. Michael mann's new book. The new climate war the fight to take back. Our planet has some ideas. Michael welcome back to climate cast. Thanks great to be with you. Give us a thumbnail sketch of your book. What's the message here. The message here is actually pretty simple. Look climate change. Denial is no longer tenable fossil fuel interests. Those who've done their bidding. Those forces of inaction the inactive. Est says i call them simply recognize that they can credibly claim that climate change isn't real that it isn't human caused in that it isn't doing real damage now and so they've turned to other tactics in an effort to delay that necessary transition away from fossil fuels Moving attention away from the need for systemic solutions for policies that incentivize renewable energy and put a price on carbon to individual lifestyle changes Another one is false. Solutions the idea that there are simple technological fixes that somehow don't necessitate us getting off of fossil fuels. Michael twenty twenty one brings a new president may be what i would call an opportunity point for climate solutions and making them a priority. What has president elect biden proposed that heads in the direction you want to see. The biden plan the plan that he has put forward. is a bold climate plan It includes massive investment government investment in renewable energy which is very important part of the solution. There is support for carbon pricing of putting a price on carbon polluters pay when they dumped carbon pollution into the atmosphere right. Now they don't have to pay for that so the biden administration is Emphasizing the importance of those actions They are also reengaging the global community Reasserting our support for international treaties like the paris treaty and in fact for going beyond the paris treaty. So we know the bottom line where the rubber meets. The road is the atmosphere and when we talk about these policy changes how quickly can policy changes start to have an impact on our atmosphere. Yeah you know. There's some good news there. The prevailing thinking a decade or so ago is that when we stop emitting carbon. The planet will still warm up for decades. There is a substantial revision now in understanding of the problem that we can stop emitting carbon in the atmosphere we will see the fruits of those efforts Pretty quickly and that's why it is important for us to act dramatically over the next ten years. What would you say to those who are apprehensive about climate solutions and the economy. And what will you be watching for the next four years. Yeah what i would say is that you know there's a fallacy that somehow we have to choose between the economy and the environment that's simply not true if we act on the climate crisis we will save literally trillions of dollars because extreme weather events are costing tens of billions of dollars every year here in the united states alone there were record number of them in two thousand twenty and so it's a win win we act on this problem now We can avert destroying this planet for future generations and we potentially have a healthier economy as a result of it. Michael man with penn state university. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective today Thank you very much. Paul was a pleasure talking with you.

Climate Policy Penn State Univ Biden Michael Mann Michael Biden Administration Paris United States Penn State University Paul