Social Identity

Who are you? Listen to the latest thought-provoking audio content on social identity and hone your sense of self. Aired on premium podcasts.

A highlight from Michael J. Fox gets personal about Parkinson's

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

A highlight from Michael J. Fox gets personal about Parkinson's

"Fox has written four books, three of them memoirs, in his latest memoir, no time like the future and optimist considers mortality, fox gets personal about his Parkinson's in how he's adapted to it. We have to be honest about what happened. We had to prove the things that just are what they are. You said that. And then it could change. You find niches in it to make it better, but you have to accept it for what it is first. In this conversation first recorded on September 17th for Washington Post live, Fox talks less about his career and more about his family. How important they are to him and how important they were to getting to the honesty depicted. In no time like the future.

FOX Parkinson Washington Post
A highlight from Jwan Yosef (Re-Release)

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:04 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Jwan Yosef (Re-Release)

"A father of two gorgeous little babies and a stepfather of two beautiful twin boys. I'm also an immigrant from Syria and in a way I've been an immigrant throughout my whole kind of grown-up life. My art practice also kind of circles around the kind of exploring of the idea of belonging and not belonging and in a way what that kind of means when you don't necessarily fit in one box. I think pretty much true. It is a beautiful intro. I think I want to start by asking you when you emigrated to the U.S.. So I was two years old when we, when my family left for Syria, I have two older siblings, and it was actually a pretty crazy story for my parents perspective. I mean, my parents come from two very different backgrounds. My mother was a Christian Armenian woman, my father was a Kurdish Muslim man. And they came from to kind of well known families up in northern northeastern Syria. And they well known how. Well, they were, you know, I think for generations just no, I mean, my grandfather was a big landowner in Syria and my grandmother came from in a way maybe more like in more influential family from the same town they met in military school when they were young and they fell in love. Which was also like a huge taboo back in the 60s. I mean, this is like our version of interracial kind of affair. It was completely super frowned upon. And meeting in military school would it have been standard for them to be in military school? It wasn't standard. It was like a mixed school

Syria U.S.
A highlight from Stevie Van Zandt's 'Unrequited Infatuations'

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

06:49 min | Last week

A highlight from Stevie Van Zandt's 'Unrequited Infatuations'

"Since the mid 1960s, from touring the world with Bruce Springsteen in the E street band to being Tony Soprano's right hand man and his work as an activist. Stevie van zant's life's journey has taken him to places many of us can only dream of, but it didn't come easily. The question is not are you going to experience disappointment and frustration in your life? The question is, what do you do with that? Stevie Van Zandt talks about it all as we discuss his new book unrequited infatuations a memoir. In this conversation, first recorded on September 28th for Washington Post live, van Sant takes us on that journey through such wonderful and unvarnished storytelling, you'll feel like you're sitting with him in a booth at hostel's diner. Stevie van zant, welcome to Washington Post live. Nice to be with each other. I'm a big fan of yours. And it's very nice to meet you and you know I think you tweeted at me tweeted at me once. And I was like, wait, Steven Vincent follows me on Twitter. So this is a thrill to meet you at least virtually. So let's talk about your book. Why did you decide that now was the time to release a memoir? Well, I think it was partly opportunity. I mean, the quarantine, you know, suggested that we were going to be home for a while. So I have new managers. I never had managers my whole life, and I just acquired some managers and they were like, why don't you write a book, you know? So I thought, you know, maybe it's the right time. You know, while I still remember like, you know, 20% of my life maybe. I better run better write it down now. Before it's all gone and I also happen to have the most the three most productive years of my life right before the quarantine. 2017, 1819, I put out two new albums sold fire and summer of sorcery and did two world tours with the disciples of soul. And ended up releasing like 6 album packages that was an amazing amazingly productive time. And I reconnected with my life's work with my music work, which I hadn't, I hadn't really done that in over 20 years. You know, I started acting and then Bruce put the band back together and before you know it 20 years went by. And I kind of abandoned my own works. So I was reconnecting to my to my music. I think really helped me have some closure for that part of my life. So what was the most important thing you wanted to share about your life? Well, it's not so much my life as much as the things I've observed and the things I've seen and the history that I lived with. I only missed the first decade of rock and roll, you know? I only missed the 50s. So I was a kid in a 60s watching it all happen. And it was such an extraordinary time. I refer to it as a renaissance period and I mean that I don't believe that type of ball. I'm feeling the most amazing and greatest art being made is also the most commercial. You know, you have yourself a renaissance. And growing up that time, I wanted to I wanted to share that share that 60s experience with people who missed it. And right into the 70s, which was just a glorious time to be alive. And we were really the luckiest generation. And I'm the luckiest of the luckiest generation. Well, I want to jump, I'm going to jump into the 60s and rock and roll, because in the book. You wrote about the process of trading in your devotion to the baptist, the baptist religion for an obsession with rock and roll and more specifically groups like The Beatles and Rolling Stones influenced you. Explain how there were many fans around back then Jonathan. I know it sounds it sounds weird to say that, but you know, we had a lot of individual stars, you know, coming from the 50s, you know, the bodega leads and chuck berries. And we had a lot of doo wop groups, harmony groups. But they weren't that many bands. And so I wasn't that interested in show business. I wasn't that interested in the individual so much. You know, I was buying a few singles and enjoying the records. But I never really had a connection to any of the artists. Until The Beatles came and suddenly, you know, he was a band. And they were followed by 15 more terrific bands. We call it the British invasion. And that communicated something different to me. And I think to all of us. Four or 5 guys singing and playing was unusual. I mean, if you went to your high school dance, you saw an instrumental group. You know, there was nobody singing. And you know, and basically the communication of friendship and family and community was really the communication that turned me on. And I wanted that as a as a lifestyle, more that more than the show business aspects of it. But I always combined The Beatles and stones because The Beatles were just too perfect. They were a revelation of this whole new idea of being in a band. But they were so good. We only caught them halfway through the career. You know, they were already fantastic. And then The Rolling Stones came four months later, and they made it look easier than it was and you know, they kind of wore what they felt like, you know, kind of like the first punk band. And so how I like to refer to it as The Beatles introduced a brand new world to us and The Rolling Stones invited us in. Oh, that's terrific. You know, Stevie, I don't know if you heard the rustling after I asked that last question. Your book fell out of my lap. Because I want to ask you about something that you wrote. You just talked about The Beatles, and you talked about Rolling Stones. But in your book, you also write about Little Richard and you write Little Richard Little Richard was the embodiment and archetype of the philosophy of rock and roll freedom. My man, his flamboyant, multi sexual androgyny said, you can be whoever you want to be. He turned rock into an art form that only not only tolerated reinvention but demanded it. And here's the line that jumped out at me. He opened his

Stevie Van Zant Stevie Van Zandt Steven Vincent Washington Post Tony Soprano Van Sant Bruce Springsteen The Beatles And Rolling Stones Chuck Berries Twitter Bruce Jonathan The Beatles The Rolling Stones Richard Little Richard Stevie Little Richard
In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:32 min | 2 months ago

In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

"In the beginning of your book. You mentioned that the writing began in part out of frustration and frustration specifically fueled by how media covers autism. What frustrated you about that. And what were you hoping to do about it in this book so i feel like the frustration i had about the way we talk about autism was that any conversation about autism began and ended with discussion about vaccines. I should say the completely false idea that vaccines caused autism. There is no evidence whatsoever about it and then there was the other part. Which is that if we want to get. We wind up getting past discussing vaccines. There's just a lot of discussion. about curing. autistic people are curing autism or combating autism or fixing autistic people and almost never. Was there any discussion about well. What is it that autistic people need right now. Even if you believe that there should be a cure which i really articulate that. I don't think that there should be cure that there can be a cure for autism. That's something that's a long way down the road and that doesn't really serve autistic people now and i also was frustrated that i felt like almost every discussion about autism focused mostly on white male adolescent boys and i felt like that was a very incomplete. Discussion about autism was a very incomplete excluded. Plenty of autistic people who. Don't that that categorization right right so it. Just it sounds like there's just a lot of myths that get perpetuated through the media which is all too common right and that this in part this was to dispel some of those that have been so pervasive precisely. I think that one of the things that i wanted to do was again to ball from the title of my book. Change the autism conversation to include as many people as possible. Because i felt that there were. There are a lot of pernicious ideas. About what the idea about whether autistic people can live independently or even even if they can't live independently live and they deserve to live in the community rather than institutions or the idea that autistic people can either not work or only work in a very specific sector of science technology engineering mathematics. And i also thought that there were a lot of misconceptions about whether people can have families or have legitimate relationships or legitimate

Autism
Who Was Ida B. Wells?

Made of Mettle

02:32 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Ida B. Wells?

"In today's episode we will be covering the impassioned the influential the inspiring ida b wells ida. B wells was born ida bell wells on july sixteenth eighteen sixty two in holly springs mississippi. Ida was the eldest. Born to james and lizzie wells. Who had seven other children. All were born in slaved as they lived on a plantation in mississippi whom or members of the confederacy during the civil war in the previous episode. We talked a bit about president. Lincoln's revolutionary decision to issue the emancipation proclamation on january. First eighteen sixty three during the civil war ida in her family were officially freed from slavery as they resided in a confederate state before either was one year old immediately following. The war was the pivotal reconstruction period with a divided territories of the union in the confederacy. Determine how they would begin to come back together as a single nation. Ida's parents were dutiful in diligence supporters of african american rights in particular the right to an education. Ida's father james was directly involved in starting in serving on the board of trustees for school for freed african americans that school rushed. College is still a notable inactive university. Today falling under the umbrella of historically black colleges and universities ida would begin her educational career at this school attending in her early teens. Sadly heartbreaking circumstances would find ida early on in life in eighteen seventy eight while visiting her grandmother. I learned harling news. Ida's mother father in her youngest sibling. Just an infant had passed away from yellow fever. Her parents sudden-death turn ida from a teenager with no children into a parent of six suffering from the grief and loss of one's parents. It would be understandable for a child to shy away in resist taking on a role with such incredible responsibility but did ida shy away from her obligation torture family. Absolutely not

IDA Ida Bell Wells Lizzie Wells Mississippi Holly Springs Board Of Trustees For School F James Wells Lincoln Yellow Fever
Susupect: Neww Podcast Looks at Racial Profiling After Halloween Murder

In God We Lust

01:09 min | 3 months ago

Susupect: Neww Podcast Looks at Racial Profiling After Halloween Murder

"Residence of a redman apartment complex. Were throwing a big halloween party with dozens of people in costume mingling drinking and dancing but after the party started to quiet down one of them was murdered in her home. The police spent weeks piecing together. The night with hazy recollections spotty dna evidence and dozens of party photos eventually. They had a suspect. His story kept changing his. Dna was at the crime scene when he finally came in for questioning. The detectives felt like they were breath away from a confession but that didn't happen and so the police decided to focus their attention on another man. A man with a criminal record whose. Dna was also found at the crime scene and he just so happened to be. The only black man at the party suspects starts out as a compelling who done it and then becomes a story about cutting edge forensic science and mislaid justice. It's about race and policing and ultimately the kinds of weighty decisions that cops and prosecutors make every day decisions that once made change lives forever and are almost impossible to

We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:06 min | 3 months ago

We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

"Bryan stevenson. Thank you very much for being on the podcasts. For having us down here in your offices at the equal justice initiative here in montgomery alabama. Thank you. It's great to be with you so before we get to the reason why we're actually down here. I want you to define a term that you see when you go to the legacy museum when you go to the national memorial for peace and justice and that is racial terror. Lynchings have that right. Yes that's right so what we're talking about our lynchings. That were designed to terrorize people. Based on their race. I think popular culture. We have a notion that lynchings were what happened when someone was hanged. And of course lots of lynching victims weren't actually hanged. They were drowned. They were beaten to death. They were shot. they were burned alive. And so when we talk about lynchings we're talking about a category of crime. Committed by groups of people and racial terror. lynchings Are murders crimes committed by groups of people of african americans to terrorize the african american community. there was mob violence. There was frontier justice in many parts of this country where there was no functioning criminal justice system. If someone did something violent or broke the law group might come together to exercise punishment against that person and that respect you would see white people hanged. Ut other kinds of people hang but they weren't trying to terrorize the community. It was typically for a well known violent crime around which there was some group consciousness that someone had to be punished. Black people were typically lynched in communities where there was a functioning criminal justice system. There was no need for frontier justice and in fact hundreds were pulled out of jails and courthouses to be lynched and these lynchings were violence directed. Not just at that individual. But at the entire african american community

Bryan Stevenson National Memorial For Peace An Montgomery Alabama
Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

TED Talks Daily

02:08 min | 4 months ago

Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

"Among muniz. Irby i was born in east jerusalem and a tough part of town between between the neighborhood and the shafat refugee camp. I'll mix child that means. My mother is jewish and my father's palestinian so the refugee experience runs very deep in the dna of the family. When my jewish grandparents were fleeing europe because of world war two. They came to palestine and drove the other part of my family into exile. When i was fourteen. I stumbled by accident into a theater show and this rough part of town and i fell in love. I fell in love with a reality that was being created in front of me reality. That was full of possibilities. That was wilder was free. A reality that was an opposite contrast of the harsh reality we were living in and i became a theatre. Practitioner becoming a theatre. Practitioner and palestine is like conjuring water in the desert. We don't have the infrastructure. We don't have the big artistic institutions. What we do have is a need and something to say about the world. We live in taking my shows to communities in refugee camps in palestine. I was always struck by the immediacy of the encounter and that became a very powerful experience for me in two thousand fifteen at the height of the refugee crisis when hundreds of thousands of people were walking across europe with all the pain and the anguish that we saw. I started thinking that maybe we need to create a new model of theater. Maybe we need to take our theater out of the theaters and into the streets. The streets where these people were walking. And i started working with good sean theater company Company that creates theater about the refugee experience together. We created the walk. The walk is a rolling arts festival. That will cross eight thousand kilometers sixty five cities towns and villages in its way and we will create one hundred twenty events of welcome.

Shafat Refugee Camp Palestine Irby Muniz East Jerusalem Europe Wilder Sean Theater
Why Racist Policies  Not People  Are the Problem

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:22 min | 4 months ago

Why Racist Policies Not People Are the Problem

"Dr kennedy welcome to the podcast. Oh it's always great. John beyond so the last time you were here you were on with your co editor of four hundred souls community. History of african america sixteen nineteen to twenty nineteen. But i've asked you here so low today because your name was invoked in my interview with a former new orleans mayor mitch landrieu and i thought you know what is a good opportunity to to have dr kennedy on. Here's what mitch said. Dr abram mix kennedy has said something that i had not really thought much about he basically has posited the theory that we've always moved side-by-side good with evil and one overtakes the other from time to time and both are always present. And then mitch goes on to say. And i don't know whether i don't know that he's more right than wrong. But it sure feels like right. Now the forces of what. I would describe as white nationalism white supremacy this notion that somehow whiteness is essential to the future of america for some people who consider themselves to be. Patriots is a very dangerous idea. And this this idea of good and simultaneously basically coexisting in one overtaking. The other i would love for you to since he's attributing it to you talk more about that. Where does that come from. And how does it manifest itself good and evil. Well i mean. I have written about the sort of racial history of this country a history of of of racial progress in an even a history of racists progress. I don't i wouldn't necessarily call it the clash between good and evil because i think it's it's important trustee too complicated even further in that you know you you have people who express sort of or maybe a part of both off forces at different times or or you have people have good intentions but you know it. Has you know a difficult outcome in. And still i don't know if we can essentially call that good or

Dr Kennedy Dr Abram Mix Kennedy Mitch Mitch Landrieu America New Orleans John Patriots
Andrew Rannells: From Book of Mormon to Modern Love

LGBTQ&A

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Andrew Rannells: From Book of Mormon to Modern Love

"So like many people remember seeing seeing the tonys in two thousand eleven and soon after you popped up on girls. Hbo and have gone onto this largely tv and film career. Was that the plan all along. Did you want to transition eventually to tv while you were doing theater and doing the show. No not exactly. I mean i had wanted to be on broadway since i was a kid. And my dream had always been beyond broadway and to be a leading man on broadway and i the opportunity to replace a couple of shows than when i did that a couple times. I was like really like to do a new one. That would be nice. So i took some some time to focus on just trying to find new musicals that that i could come into to new york with and debut on broadway and it happened that it was the book of mormon every few years. There's a broadway show. That sort of attracts the attention of the west coast. It happened with rent in. It happened with certainly with hamilton and the book of mormon was also one of their shows. And if i'm being totally honest. I'd film two seasons of girls and then had done a pilot with ryan murphy for show called the new normal that was picked up and was going to be on. Nbc and i was still doing the book of mormon. While i was doing all of that i was still in the show. I didn't know that. Yeah and i was able to continue to do it. And then it got picked up. And then i had to move. I had to move to los angeles and it was an opportunity. That was too good to not pass up and it was not necessarily. The tv stuff was not necessarily always on my radar. I really just wanted to do theater

HBO Ryan Murphy West Coast Hamilton New York NBC Los Angeles
Pacifique X and Finding Eimable

Diaspora Blues

02:22 min | 4 months ago

Pacifique X and Finding Eimable

"Welcome to for a blues hominy. Hey thanks for having me before i start. I just want to acknowledge that. I appreciate you taking the time now to share your story with us I know it can't be easy. So i do appreciate that thank you. How would you describe your brother to people who don't know him So in mobley is a very loving person. His name actually named lovable in spanish. And i say he's very like kerry radius and this is not just me trying to boost team up or try to make him sam in something special genuinely is and Yeah describing as very grounded earthy old His fagin as well. So he's very live about his health Get attacking describe my brother play and it just very loving and easy to get along with. Is he the oldest family. Yes i'm up. Live is the oldest. He's twenty four years old right okay. So he's your big brother If you're up to its harmony can you share when and where he went missing and obviously what you choose to disclose is up to you So last time you saw him was all the six Of the twenty third seattle five weeks ago from now So we lost the last time. You seen on In where i be at gordon keith. reserve and unless last time we saw and he was wearing a camera jacket within over day hoodie and he had congress. Bag was black pants and black high top sneakers and his hair was loose in a penny chow effort and Year that's celeste tom sawyer and what he was wearing

Mobley Kerry SAM Gordon Keith Seattle Congress Tom Sawyer
Interview With Actor, Designer, Jonathan Bennett and Jaymes Vaughan

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Actor, Designer, Jonathan Bennett and Jaymes Vaughan

"I always have guessed introduce themselves. Would you introduce yourselves sure. I'm jonathan bennett. And this is my fiance. Say your name baby on that. Say out breathing out so they can hear your name. What is your name. Babe james von there. We go so far. It's going great. Yeah it is going great. This is ideal. Because i'm really feel like i'm really capturing something of your dynamic in the the reality between two you are engaged. You're engaged. we are engaged thing. Love that joke. 'cause we're gay and we're engaged sure yet so we're get. Let me explain the joke for you. In case you didn't get i so good good do guy nail i follow. Nailed it very. Yeah jonathan you had kind of a big year. It feels like to me. I'm just an outsider. Looking at your life does that feel true to you. Yeah i mean this is ben. it's not only a big year but super special year like it's just been there so many groundbreaking things that have happened in the past year with us and with just clear visibility in the media and it's been such a. It's almost like when it rains. It pours like we didn't set out to do any of these things but all of a sudden things started happening. And it's kinda snowballed into this movement that we're just so proud of

Jonathan Bennett Babe James Von Jonathan BEN
Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:31 min | 4 months ago

Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

"Renee welcome to washington post live. Hi jonathan. I'm so happy to be here with you. Well i'm happy to have you here. You have consulted for some of the biggest companies in the country and every big company is focused on diversity inclusion and equity or at least. They say they are so. How do you measure the inclusion health of company. What are you look for when you look at well. of course. Most people think demographics in the numbers. And certainly that is very important to look at so you can see sort of where the gaps are but what it's harder to measure is the sense of belonging and inclusion and the ability for people to share their perspectives and have opportunity and to move up and to be compensated so the entire kind of employee life cycle has to be evaluated for you to really know. Is their health. One thing at netflix to that we think about is who speaks and who doesn't in who gets descent and who doesn't those are all aspects of health. That's a really interesting that this focus on sense sense of belonging so to that point of as particularly at netflix who speaks. And and who doesn't who was the was it you. Were you the person who said that. It means something and it might mean something more than you think when you're in a meeting and there's that one person or two people who don't speak ashore and i'm sure i'm not the only person who said who said that the voices so much of the work which to do around inclusion is to remember that their voices we have never heard there are perspectives. That have never been really given air. And if any company wants to move into the future and be resilient incompetent incapable in and relevant right and to serve their constituencies in customers. They've got to be on this journey of inclusion because it's where the innovation is is where the creativity is. It's where the excitement is in so for us as a company. Amine it's easy were trying to entertain the world. We dare not try to do that without getting many more voices than both the entertainment and the tech industries have had over since their inception wife. Frankly

Netflix Renee Washington Post Jonathan
Coalition on Homelessness & Street Sheet Newspaper

Voices of the Community

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Coalition on Homelessness & Street Sheet Newspaper

"Thanks for being here. Jennifer and quiver. Thank you so much for having us. So i a subscriber slash reader of st sheet which i allied and jennifer has been following. All of your wonderful worked for many years pushing the system is hired as you possibly can. Which is great. I'm so glad we could carve out the time to host of you on the show. So i'd love to begin with jennifer having you provide the audience just an overview of the coalition on homelessness your various programs and the research pieces so the coalition on homelessness. Does something call community organizing the which was kind of made famous by barack obama. A lot of folks necessarily know what that was but what it is pulling people together with a common interest in trying to alter relations of power and address systemic change in our case. It's really focused on homelessness. But we're about a thirty year old organization founded by some in house folks in front line service providers who are really frustrated with the lack of participation of homeless people in the crafting of solutions to pretty frustrated with the response to homelessness which was primarily. This is an urgent bang. It's opened up some shelters and not really getting at the systemic causes of stats. And so not that we try to do and we do outreach. Regularly to announce people and get their input on what we should be fighting for and try to get them engaged in these struggles of about a half. Our staff of experienced homelessness are board etc. And we basically take that input create goals that were working towards and build campaigns around him using a variety of different tools whether it's organizing protests or organizing hearings or writing legislation or doing lawsuits or doing research and releasing reports. So we also have a newspaper reach need that is written primarily by on house folks and is the longest continuously published street newspaper in the us with the largest distribution and something. We're really proud of and it has artwork ot articles. Really trying to express to folks you know from the street perspective from our house perspective. What is going on about homelessness

Jennifer Barack Obama United States
Can Toronto Police Itself out of a Homelessness Crisis?

The Big Story

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Can Toronto Police Itself out of a Homelessness Crisis?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Leilani fara is a former un special reporter on the right to housing. She is currently the global director of the shift which is a movement to secure the right to housing. So the perfect person to talk about what's going on in toronto recently. Hello alani hi there. Thank you for taking the time. Maybe we could just start for people outside of toronto and people who haven't been following it. Tell me about how the city has been handling encampments of an housed people that have formerly at least existed in parks across the city. Yes so with. The pandemic came actually a significant increase in the number of people living in parks across the city of toronto actually across canada. But we're talking about toronto. So i'll keep. I'll keep my comments there. And there are a number of reasons for that but one of them was of course the downsizing of shelters because of the social distancing rules that were part of the prescription to Try to curb the pandemic and so you know. Big shelters became smaller shelters. So let's say there were thirty beds. It might have gone down to fifteen beds. Hundred beds might have gone down to thirty beds and with nowhere to go. A lot of people ended up in parks. There are other reasons as well. As the pandemic ruled on it became increasingly clear that congregate or you know settings where a lot of people reside were becoming Hotbeds of Spread of covert and so a lot of people. Were thinking wait. I think i'm better off even though as really tough living. It's actually some of the living in parks. I actually might survive in a park. Whereas i may not in a shelter and of course we all know. Shelters are really hard places to live at the best of times so so toronto. The city of toronto saw this steep increase in the number of people living in parks and many parks park cats and bigger parks across the city.

Toronto Jordan Heath Rawlings Leilani Fara UN Canada
Texas State Rep. Senfronia Thompson Explains Why She Joined the Austin Walkout

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:20 min | 4 months ago

Texas State Rep. Senfronia Thompson Explains Why She Joined the Austin Walkout

"State representative cynthia thompson. Thank you so much. For coming to the podcast. Thank you for having me so at that. Press conference in virginia. You talked about your grandmother and the obstacles she faced when she got the chance to vote what were some of those obstacles. She added by poll tax and she yet to save our money. Nicholson pin is not quarters. You'd be able to purchase a poll tax. And then once she got up old tax she had a long ways to travel to cast that ballot. It was Transportation was nothing like being honest. This debate you had to wait for a bus to another part of the city. A pretty good distance from where she was in over fifteen miles. I'm pretty sure in order attacks. Her ballot and she was only allowed to vote in the general election because she was an african american being black. You couldn't vote in the primaries in texas. I wanted you to start with your grandmother. And i'm gonna do something that a gentleman are not supposed to do. We are not supposed to ask a woman her age that i think it's important for people to understand representative thompson. How old are you. I'm eighty two years old. And i needed people to hear that because the fact that you are talking about your grandmother and the obstacles she faced in voting in that the reason why you and i are talking now is about voting. This is not. This is not history. This is living memory for for you. I would love for you to put in context where we are right. Now as a country when it comes to voting rights we're regressing we regressing back to a place in history where we wanna limit minorities right to participate in that democracy just like. My grandmother was limited in her right to participate in democracy. We're going back to that same stage now so it looks like real just regressing.

State Representative Cynthia T Nicholson Virginia Texas Thompson
The Effects of Trump's Migrant Protection Protocol

Latino USA

02:22 min | 4 months ago

The Effects of Trump's Migrant Protection Protocol

"So it's sunday march seven and it's to be eleven. Am and right. Now i'm in the modus mexico I'm in a small plus that is right next to the microphone. Tenting cat mint is. I recorded this audio earlier this year the day after a migrant camp just across from brown so in south texas was cleared out for almost two years it was the home for hundreds of mostly central americans and mexicans seeking asylum in the us most had finally been allowed into the us some were sent to nearby shelter before they can be processed into the country others however were left in limbo. You know what i'm looking inside and it's really really quiet I'm used to you know hearing you know kids families moms dads talking to each other running around playing really really quite now at one point this now. Empty area held more than three thousand asylum. Seekers forced to wait in mexico as their cases made their way or us immigration courts. Historically for decades people had always been allowed to remain in the us while seeking asylum. It's their right under. Us law and international treaty obligations but the trump administration disregarded all of that when it is the remain in mexico policy officially known as the migrant protection protocols or mpp the policy. I rolled out in january of twenty thousand hundred in southern california and slowly spread across the entire southern border. As they walked by the ten are here. They're empty. They see firewood branches. I see little tables. They see shoes. You know that have been left behind. It's kinda crazy that it's like now closed. I met so many families who had been living in this camp without much help from either the mexican or us governments. They injured a hurricane a freeze deaths in the rio grande a pan-demic scorching hundred degree summers extortion and violence from criminal organizations and so much more

Mexico United States South Texas Southern California Hurricane Rio Grande
The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

teikirisi

01:45 min | 4 months ago

The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

"Monty was born in louisiana on january twenty eighth eighteen fifty three aquarius. His parents were poor. spanish immigrants. His father was sent to cuba. As first sergeants from valencia. Yeah and so it. Only sixteen years of age as modesty was already arrested and accused of disloyalty to spain. It's interesting that he is one generation off from being spanish but at the young age of sixteen is already against spanish but he saw a lot of atrocities at the hands of the spanish. Exactly when we get into what life is like in cuba. During that time a lot of it was influenced by the spanish colonial rule. In so back will at the as early life. After he was arrested in accused he was sentenced to force labor. He got actually pretty lucky. Because he was granted clemency and deported to spain. The reason i say he was lucky is because A lot of other folks during this time. Who got accused of something like this loyalty. They were sent to the firing squad. So this teenager rebel. Who doesn't like spain and gets accused of disloyalty to spain get sent to spain. And what does he end up doing while you know what they say. I can allow gondola threat. Dasa so he gets to spain and he continues with his bullshit he continues making writings against the spanish and he specifically writes political prison in cuba where he described his experiences in cuba and critiques spanish further handling of him as a prisoner and further handling of

Spain Cuba Monty Valencia Louisiana Dasa
Hating Your Body Is Solvable

Solvable

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Hating Your Body Is Solvable

"Is it important for the plus size community to be able to wear bikinis to be able to wear long story that fits. Why is that important number one. We deserve the same access to the same trends and things that everyone else so does baseline we deserve beautiful bikinis and laundry because everyone has it. And why shouldn't we. But beyond that. I think the bigger mission is to help people feel good in their bodies and we've been told historically as people that we should not feel good in our bodies that we should not show our skin that we shouldn't cover up and hide and be invisible and so a to swim. Soup is the most skinnier ever could probably going to be able to show in public and so that has to be an experience where you feel like you should be seen and should be accepted and should feel good in your skin so like because it also feels unattainable for a lot of us to quote unquote love our bodies all the time and even i definitely don't love my body every single day. I'm not obsessed with it. But it's more about kind of overcoming this culture that tells us we have to hate ourselves and constantly be on a weight loss journey. That's kind of a body. Productivity and fat positively is even more radical. Where in its. I say that ironically like it shouldn't be radical but the idea that you can accept and love your body even if it's fat which in our culture of course the word fat has been so stigmatized so associated with things like lisi or unhealthy or a million other things and so is really this idea. It's like no you can be fat and happy. You can be fat and beautiful. You could be fat and all these other amazing things and to really accept that. And learn that i think is kind of transformative idea and process to go through as somebody who has lived that experience

Lisi
"Whispers to God": Islam and Mental Health

Immigrantly

02:13 min | 4 months ago

"Whispers to God": Islam and Mental Health

"Hi everyone be back in the studio. It's crazy to be back here. Slowly returning back to recording are episodes. In which is create because now i can share the same physical space with my guests and colleagues and today. I'm here with sarah. She is one of our writers alot. Everyone so sad. I'll why don't you introduce yourself to our listeners. Yeah hi guys. I'm sarah and i am the content and media editor for immigrants. I've been here for quite some time now. Almost two years right. Yeah it's crazy time flies. So what is today's episode about sara. Yes so we partnered with indiana university's muslim voices project and we decided to get together and make an episode about the relationship between islam and mental health. And we did that. Because in my opinion spirituality is really just about knowing how to stay in a good state of mind throughout the entirety of just you know existing as a human so i feel like it makes complete sense for us to explore how religion can be a part of that. Because i feel like on this show. We've done a lot of talking about religion as an institution and from a historical place. But i feel like it's time to really delve into how it affects. People and also the concept of spirituality. Right it applies to everyone. Everyone who follow organized religion braces people. Who don't follow religion at all. At least if not spirituality than mindfulness right. Yeah definitely. Sarah tell us a little bit about our guests. Yes so our guests are heather. Coup who is a professor at indiana university and hanan moawad who is a friend of muslim voices and they are both practicing muslims Heather is from wisconsin and she actually converted after meeting her now ex husband and after starting a family with him. Her relationship to islam really strengthened. And she really became a fully practicing muslim when she had her miscarriage at a relatively early age and that really set her into a place where she needed that sort of guidance.

Sarah Indiana University Sara Hanan Moawad Heather Wisconsin
The (De)Colonizing of Beauty With Sasha Sarago

TED Talks Daily

02:20 min | 4 months ago

The (De)Colonizing of Beauty With Sasha Sarago

"Today i would like to talk to you about beauty and how. We've got it all wrong when it comes to our perceptions of women particularly aboriginal women but before i do i would like to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land in which i stand upon the gotta go people of the urination. I pay my respects to the elders past present and emerging and give thanks to our ancestors who guide and protect us. It was nine hundred ninety. And i was pumped was off to my first birthday party just before i hit the terrible teams no chaperone in. No brady's sister to tag along so she could snitch. I had my cute little outfit on gift in hand. And i was hoping that this little cutie that i liked would show up and i was hoping that this little cutie would ask me this one question. You know that question. That makes you hot. Beat right out to chest. Do you wanna be my girlfriend. Even though i had no business having a boyfriend at that age but it didn't matter because back then it was all about the rush. I never did get asked that question but the question i did get asked was what should background and like any proud. Aboriginal child would declare. I'm aboriginal given the reaction of the room. Being aboriginal was clearly a dirty word and at the tender age of eleven. I was told by my best friend's adult system that i was too pretty to be aboriginal by this time. My mouth is dry. My blood is boiling. And i'm trying so hard to fight back. What feels like an ocean of tears. I calmly joined my circle of friends and begin to fake laugh. At whatever is funny to mass. My embarrassment as i clutch on to my new found complex.

Brady
Edafe Okporo: Seeking Asylum in the U.S.

LGBTQ&A

02:34 min | 4 months ago

Edafe Okporo: Seeking Asylum in the U.S.

"Law that passed into doesn't fourteen in nigeria. That made same sex relationships illegal. I want definitely get to that but before while you were growing up. But was the general feeling attitude toward gay people. generally jerry's predominantly pit rocky so like men. I supposed to be man. We met a supposed to steer to them. Just like united st sixty years ago but the was put that was done by amnesty international into sanity that shows their ninety. Eight percent of nigerians believed that gay people added costs of the country problem but green up really really young. I was kind of a firm units but because of the kind of violence. I is key that people. Why do you like that. You should play soccer things like that made me kind of change. Our ib to become on the airstream rights to be very very much. And i grew up in a predominantly christina varmints and the christian religion. Don't believe that's should be like if you're gay you are possessed by demonic spirits or something like that says really long way for me to fight true or this kind of towards and really say that i am gay is hard to grow in such kind of cities and things that you're gay while so. When did you start to feel comfortable telling people so people were in closets all his know that it is hard to come out of your closet. It is very difficult. I forward myself almost three years. I did a go. I joined charged seminary. I became a political surpassed like augustine's. You're like i knew him key but i just don't want to believe our gay but one the i was reading on the internet is a quote from make that dr bernard out we give our oppressors biden align ourselves to be ourselves so i ran out undefeated on a was seen to myself. Am i really key things like that. So one day. I went on the internet and i discovered a gated uppercut manager is football in like our earned some parts of africa by the. What's it called. Menachem man jam. Gotcha i emit a guy who to me. If you have feelings florida guys. you'll be. And as i said only g.

Nigeria Jerry Soccer Dr Bernard Augustine Biden Menachem Football Africa Florida
Interview With Mitch Landrieu, Former New Orleans Mayor

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:20 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Mitch Landrieu, Former New Orleans Mayor

"Mitch landrieu welcome back to the podcast. Thanks for having me in a continuation of a conversation. You and i have been having for now years and that is our country race. Our country's desperate need for not only racial reckoning but also reconciliation. And i would just love for you to start out by giving your assessment on where we are as a nation right now. Well i think that the word that comes to mind to media sobering and as you said in your question about this continuing conversation that we've been having it occurs to me that this is a conversation that the country's been having with itself sometimes well and sometimes very poorly since the beginning of our time it sure feels like we head backwards right now Bought that i am mindful that we just celebrated the first anniversary of john lewis's death And when people would get down in the dumps and say we haven't made much progress he would admonish us and say i'm evidence that we've made a lot of progress but we still have a very long way to go in. Freedom's not free. You have to work for it every day. I i am a little bit chagrined in not in a good place on why it seems to be so hard for us to do with obviously right for the future of the country but as a practical politician on whose job a used to be to assess. What's possible and what's necessary. It's important for us to realize that we were in. We are in a critical moment that this is a this is a time in. This happens every now and then where the country has to make a decision and that decision really matters about whether you're going to go back whether you're gonna go forward so i believe that we're in this really very difficult struggle where we have to continue to advocate very strong for the very simple idea that we all come to the table. Democracy is equals and that everybody should have a fair shot at the american dream. We don't have it right now. And that there are forces that continued to reject that very idea and that is a very dangerous face to begin.

Mitch Landrieu John Lewis
Biden's Door to Door Vaccines

Say What Needs Saying

01:47 min | 5 months ago

Biden's Door to Door Vaccines

"Welcome back to season to say with me. And saying i am brandon and a few things have popped up and most importantly the ones that needs to be talked about. I think is what let us today. This'll be an aside borrow them. In second i going back and forth just chat around the fireside conversation Circle on some of the things that. I don't know that i think everyone should be brought to knowledge about Have you will for those. Who are listening if he rather if you did or did i get a of vaccine recently. There's a potential end. We recently saw a press conference in that the administration will like to go door to door. And i guess hold you buy your arm and give you vaccines was the zach have you. Have you heard more about this. I haven't heard much out of the outside of the press conference so i will. I'll give him the benefit of the doubt right now and say that i think might hope is that it's more of an advocacy type. Psa type thing. But i you know as opposed to going door to door with a cooler dry ice and vaccines hand So i'm hoping that's the extent of it but yeah. I think that it was pretty. It was a pretty big statement. Sacchi said biden did double down on it. He he came out and made a statement to saying that these different avenues. We're going to be pursuing. One of them is the storm door. He said something like community to community and in some cases even door to door. It doesn't i. i know. I'm not the only one but it doesn't sit right with me It doesn't feel like a good idea. It doesn't feel like the right way to handle this. The right move

Brandon Sacchi Biden
Family Doctors Want to Come off the Bench for Vaccinations

The Big Story

01:47 min | 5 months ago

Family Doctors Want to Come off the Bench for Vaccinations

"Youth rawlings doctor. Liz mega is the president of the -tario college of family physicians. Hello dr mauka. You're very welcome. This is something that a lot of people we've talked to about vaccines. Sit a conversation that we should have at some point. So i'm really glad we're having it. Yeah yeah me too. You know. I think that We're excited to as family doctors to be participating in the vaccination for covid nineteen. I think there's lots lots to dig into their so. I look forward to our conversation about this. So i may be in general pre covid or just leaving cova decide. How much of vaccinating in. Canada is done by family. Physicians typically so the great majority vaccination is done by family doctors in their offices. So we start vaccinating really When we see patients at who were infants rate from the very beginning through childhood and all the way through to those who are quite elderly So that's Reality right across the country that we're doing that there are some Vaccinations that are share. The responsibility with other parts of the health sector so so school-age vaccines happen often around grades. Seven and eight that something at that public health takes the lead on many provinces including in ontario. So those school based vaccines being exception and the flu shot is one where we share with pharmacy. So in the most recent year pre covid family docs gave about fifty five percent of all flu shots. Ontario in the rest were given Through pharmacy and some public health eunice but overall family ox really are the web's leading vaccination for patients from cradle to grave. So if we

Liz Mega Tario College Of Family Physic Dr Mauka Cova Canada FLU Ontario Eunice
Why White Progressives Have Such a Hard Time Confronting Racism

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:17 min | 5 months ago

Why White Progressives Have Such a Hard Time Confronting Racism

"Robin diangelo. Welcome back to the podcast. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be with you again. So we talked a year ago. I little bit just a month or so more than a year ago and probably the most memorable moment came at the very end when you made me cry totally took me by surprise but you know it came it. Hit at this time When i think it was just before the killing of george floyd yes and you know i was already dealing with a just a lot of stuff so to have a white person just out of nowhere apologized to me for. Racism was just more than my. My heart could bear in that moment. But you are back because you have what i'm calling part two of your first book which is white Why it's so hard for white people to talk about racism. Your new book is nice. Racism how progressive white people perpetuate racial harm. And i remember in our conversation about white fragility. How i think i also thank you for putting doesn't making a point of talking about white progressives and just how and i so agree being a black person and my black friends and i have talked about this. How white progressives can be some of the worst people we have to deal with. Why did you feel is important to and you write about white progressives in white fragility why did you feel. It was important to put the focus. The laser beam focused on white progressives in in nice races waiting for two reasons. One white progresses are my people. I usually progressive. And that's who. I'm around all the time and i think that the patterns and the forms of resistance that you see from people we would not call white. Progressives are pretty easy easy to see pretty explicit. I think it's harder to put your hands on the ways. That folks like me in at racism.

Robin Diangelo George Floyd
Giving Jewish Teenage Girls Their Voice

Good People Talk

01:39 min | 5 months ago

Giving Jewish Teenage Girls Their Voice

"Giggles magazine is such an intriguing idea. And i remember hearing about it from jimmy allen black. I think at jewish women's foundation of new york. And i said this is a really creative idea. What draws you to the point of starting this. Why did you think there was a need in space for i. I have such fond memories of sitting in cafes with you and talking about the world and thank you for this opportunity to be here today. So i started thinking about j. girls about six years ago. I have three daughters. They are now fourteen almost twelve and almost nine. I remember watching these young girls. And how outspoken. They were and how willing they were to say what they needed and how assertive. They were voicing their opinions and asking for the things that they needed to make themselves feel complete. I knew from research but also from my own experience and from being in the world and watching the young people around me that as they grew toward their teen years they're going to absorb all of the social cues that were telling them to make themselves smaller and quieter sometimes quite literally. Don't take so much physical space. In addition to not not letting your voice be so loud. And i started to think about what i could give my daughters to let them know that their voices would always matter and their needs would always matter and their opinions would always count and their understanding of themselves and their peers was valuable wisdom that enhanced everybody

Giggles Magazine Jimmy Allen Jewish Women's Foundation Of N
Interview With Jessamyn Stanley, Author of 'Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance'

PM Mood

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Jessamyn Stanley, Author of 'Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance'

"How do you explain what yoke means. Right what is it like to practice that love and acceptance every day like. How do you start your day so that you are grounded in the right space night. Goodness well okay. Thank you so much for him. And what i will say in response to. What is yoke yoke is like my american millennial translation of the word yoga yoga meaning union bringing together. And yoke is that. It's just a union. It's bringing together all the different pieces of yourself earned whether that be good or bad or really i think more specifically and more necessarily the ugly seeing every single piece of yourself and not trying to fix it or make it or try to be good or not trying to categorize anything religious. Saying this is who i am. And i'm going to accept every single piece of myself and that is what i have felt that my yoga practice honestly has always been but i think that yoga going it's talking about in the mainstream is always categorized as minutes at this point in whenever we talk about it. It's always like yoga poses in sequences. It's not about this connection to the truth of yourself and relate needing to accept every single facet of yourself and i think of joking as a moment by moment journey that is always evolving in that will it's time just becomes more complex and more decadent honestly but just becomes more journey becomes more intense

Ty Seidule Went From Revering Robert E. Lee to Being One of His Fiercest Detractors

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Ty Seidule Went From Revering Robert E. Lee to Being One of His Fiercest Detractors

"Ties julie. Thank you so much for. Coming to the podcast. Oh jonathan my absolute pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me. I found out about your book. Your book has been out for more than a year. Now right no. It came out the end of january this year. Oh the end of january. This year. Because i got an email from rancher now who is the pulitzer prize winning author of biographies on alexander. Hamilton george washington. The latest one grant and He sent me an email and he said you must read. You must read robert e lee and me by ties egeli. You have to read it It is right up your alley. And i'm so glad he recommended it and i'm so glad i read it because it truly is something i've been dying to read and that is a white southerner taking on race racism but most importantly the myth of the lost cause And so how about we. Just start right at the beginning. Who were you when you were a young kid. Growing up in virginia. Who did you want to model your life after jonathan i. It's crazy to say it. But i wanted to be like robert e lee and i did. My first. chapter book was about robert e lee. My dad taught at a school in northern virginia. Where the descendants of robert e lee were He was the ultimate virginia. Gentlemen and educated christian gentleman and everything in my life in alexandria led me to believe that he was that he was this great person. If it's like that old movie Spinal tap on a scale of one to ten. I would have said lee was in eleven you know and even though i was a good episcopalian went to church every sunday. I was ahead. Acolyte later in high school i would have jesus in the four five six range so it wasn't as though is that i saw lee as good i it was reverential.

Robert E Lee Hamilton George Washington Jonathan Pulitzer Prize Julie Alexander Virginia Northern Virginia Alexandria LEE Acolyte
2A Talks: Discussing the Second Amendment With a Listener

Say What Needs Saying

01:58 min | 5 months ago

2A Talks: Discussing the Second Amendment With a Listener

"Welcome back to say what needs saying. I'm zac i'm brandon. And today we have a say would need saying spotlight episode. We're bringing on our listener. Dan to talk about something. That's important to him that he wants to talk about on this platform. Dan was previously on episode. He came on for our panel on mask mandates and mask use and he was our quote unquote anti mask mandate american. And so we're happy to you back and happy to bring up some some topics that are important to you and and dive in so thanks so much for joining us and come back on the show. Yeah glad to be here. Also as you said i i. Am dan jitter myself. Pretty run of the mill average ohioan. That's the state that i am from currently reside in so most of the gun. Laws that i'm used to will be specifically pertaining to the state of ohio. Some of them Obviously vary from state to state that is predominantly What i'd like to talk to day is a second amendment rights a lot of it specifically pertaining to what you can cannot own as a us citizen and how you would go about owning that. And i would like to start off with a our president's recent comments pertaining you f fifteen and nuclear devices in regards to their used to over the government. Let us in lease of what biden has said Hopefully people are tuning in has not going From our old episodes from not sure this is by the now he is one explain. What exactly he said. I don't have the exact quotation but what he didn't affect is you would need more than fifteen to overthrow the us government and then went on to expound on that what you would need to overthrow the. Us government would contain f. fifteens and nuclear devices

Dan Jitter DAN ZAC Brandon Ohio Biden United States Us Government
Glennon Doyle on Stepping Into Your Truth

Good Life Project

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Glennon Doyle on Stepping Into Your Truth

"We were just talking before we stepped into the room. There's this kind of interesting relationship between me. You and your life Last time you're hanging this. I feel like oh so much has changed in your world in the world will cause was probably about three and a half years ago. Something like that And you came in. You were touring for love warrior. And there's a part of your story that was public and then towards the end of our conversation. We started talking about okay. So there's actually another relationship and you shared not planned that there's another relationship that you're in but you didn't want to go any further like it's kind of mind from that point forward and then Last year i guess about a year ago abbe came in and we somehow ended up talking about that moment to and she was like she said you know she said i have listened to that small segment over and over and over because it was. She's like planet didn't use my name but it was the first public acknowledgement that i existed in her life and it meant and it was amazing And now we're sitting here today. I know i remember walking out of this room after having shared that. And you said something that me share. The i don't know you said you just look later or full of light or something. I don't know you just said something that made me i. You know when you're in love and you're just talking to share it just dying to and i felt safe here and i just remember walking out of this interview and calling her right away. I did call right away. And i said oh my god i just said it. I just sat

Abbe
Our Mythical Bootstraps

The Suburban Women Problem

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Our Mythical Bootstraps

"Of individualism and pulling yourself up by your bootstraps. What do you guys think. I think that this idea of being self made is is one of those things that we present to people. But it's a fantasy world it's amid. That's not how it actually works. I had a friend Her name is liz and she used to always say what her biggest regrets was that she was not born to rich parents and is always funny when she says it but i mean the her statement makes sense. We actually have zero choice and the situation that we are born into and the a lot of the foundations and our life a lot of the the. The trajectory of our life starts at ages that we don't really have the we don't have the ability to really make that many decisions yet but it's really the adults in our lives. That are making the decisions for us. But you have to understand that everyone does not start at the same starting line and we're talking about Being successful we have to really you know. Be mindful that everyone is not you. I think if we start there we can be a lot more empathetic about people's situations and that doesn't diminish your experience it doesn't diminish your experience to say that you had some help along the way or some luck that's a good point like both can be true you can both work really hard and also have a really good support system is another good example of this is a lot of the systems that we have in america. They require you to kinda have that support system. Good example of

LIZ America
The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

In The Thick

02:23 min | 5 months ago

The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

"June twenty eighth nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine fifty two years ago. Police raided the stonewall in a gay bar and the uprising. That followed was led by trans activists. Marsha p johnson and sylvia rivera and it sparked a movement that has continued for decades marsha and sylvia like the trans vibe in lower manhattan at the time. It was real. They were taking up space at the stonewall inn and other places and that's why when the police raided they were like nana. You're not gonna quietest so. The first pride march in new york city was held on the one year anniversary of that uprising at stonewall similar marches went on in chicago san francisco los angeles but the history of that is rooted in resistance towards police violence over the last few years. It's like you know. Hey everybody is celebrating pride there you see. Cvs there you see comcast there you see. At and t. Putting out statements basically professing to be lgbtq allies but still giving money to politicians who are pushing anti lgbtq legislation and this is just three out of the twenty five companies that are actually pushing anti lgbtq federal state politicians. So as june comes to an end can do a little bit of a temperature. Check kinda how are you feeling at this moment in our. I'm wondering how are you thinking about this moment in going forward in two thousand twenty one post pandemic to put it singly. I think that aside from everything i think. That pride is as much about a recommitment to the unfinished business of nineteen. Sixty-nine as it is a celebration celebration has to be a part of any type of commemoration especially for people color. It's how we retain joy in the moments of difficulty but at the same time. I think that we have to recognize that. There's a lot of unfinished business. And specifically when it comes to the intersection of gender identity and race and economic opportunity all of those things that sylvia and marsha embodied in their life of the challenges in the hope that still remains very much on the table. And so i think that's what pride is every year and that's what i look to do with a recommitment

Marsha P Johnson Sylvia Rivera Stonewall Inn Marsha Sylvia Manhattan CVS New York City Comcast San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago
Rashad Robinson Is a Leader Fighting for Equity and Justice

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:43 min | 5 months ago

Rashad Robinson Is a Leader Fighting for Equity and Justice

"Rashad robinson. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me. I am so glad we are able to do this conversation one because it's the last possible episode a of pride month but also because of where we are in the country right now and if there is one person to talk to about this sort of inter sexual moment we're in right now in our country. You are that person. So i'm just going to throw out this broad. Brush question to you and ask you. What would you say is the state of our union given the perch that you're in right now. Yeah i mean given the purge. I'm in right now. She's been thinking about this. A lot and i was thinking about this. A lot as we lost congressman. John lewis and thinking about all of the political In policy change that happened during his time. During that era of the sixties the voting rights act civil rights. Act spending time with Congressman john lewis sort of later in his in his tenure. I don't think we're in that same era of big serve structural policy change. I think were in this moment of deep cultural shift. You saw it last summer. When racial justice became a majoritarian issue doesn't mean there isn't backlash. But what. I mean by racial justice becoming majoritarian issues. That many people thought the best we could do in terms of activism at that time was clap outside of our windows are uplift investigative journalism and it was racial justice that moved people to the street. Move people to action led to upticks voter. Registration

Rashad Robinson Congressman John Lewis John Lewis
Progressive Take on Christianity

Immigrantly

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Progressive Take on Christianity

"Thank you so much for being here cathy. I have a lot of questions for you. And i'm really excited that we're doing this. Thank you. i'm excited to be here saadia. So right off the bat. I was listening to your interviews and i discovered that you and i agree on. Things are theme for season. Eleven is religion spirituality an american identity. We are trying to dig deep into that intersection analogy. And you're a practicing christian. What is your interpretation of god. And how does your relationship with god manifest in your everyday life. That's a great question you know. I grew up imagining god to be a white man. You know the language around heavenly father and even though my earthly father is not a white man. I think there was something around the way in sunday school that was taught and imagined or described. I always imagined kind of this older white. Bearded man and that has changed thankfully over the years and decades and really believing god is neither male nor female and fat. God as god creator doesn't take human form as god right so in the christian faith god takes human form in. Jesus yes. I agree with that but god as god for me no longer takes that form And that has been for me that biggest shift in the last few years really embracing that and understanding that and so in my day to day experience and expression and understanding of god is that there is a presence of the creator in all living things and even indirectly in all things that god the creator has created us human beings and we then intern mimic that in the creation

Saadia Cathy