Road Trips

Deep dives for long drives, waiting rooms and passing time without wasting precious minutes. Chock-full of intriguing short stories from a far-flung range of topics - hear the latest in Artificial Intelligence, True Crime thrillers, lessons in Leadership and much more, to keep your inquisitive mind satisfied as the miles fly by.

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

Court Junkie

02:13 min | just now

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

"Thirty pm on may twenty fifth two thousand twani at the intersection of east thirty eighth street and chicago avenue in minneapolis. Minnesota was the aftermath of something. Horrific that had just occurred there. Donald williams was calling nine one one of the emergency designing killing In front of chicago He is pretty noisy. Guy wasn't the rest. Yeah neck the whole time. I'll do ninety man win. Went by breathing was arrested. Nothing you've already made green light these stupid. If not responsible when the ambulance you're area cattle. Donald was talking fast. He would later say he called nine one one because he didn't know what else to do about what he had just witnessed. He told the dispatcher that he saw a police officer quote pretty much. Just kill this guy. Who wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee and this dude's neck the whole time. He said officer nine eighty-seven referring to the officer's badge number he had seen. He said the man hadn't been resisting that he was already in handcuffs when the officer knelt on him pinning him down on the ground then. The man stopped breathing and was non responsive when the ambulance came he said. Would you like to speak with us sergeant. That would go. What a wasn't the rest for. Let me get you over to the best thing for thing. Don't be his own off. Duty firefighter day. Your washing it. As well jacob go the one person he told the dispatcher he had been standing there watching with a woman who was an off duty firefighter. That woman told the officer to check the man for a pulse. He said but the officer refused

Donald Williams Chicago Minneapolis Minnesota Donald Trump GUY Jacob
A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

Bodies

02:55 min | just now

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

"No one talks to girls about their cervical fluid. It's like denying semen exists. It's denying that you sneeze and blow your nose. So your cervix do you know what your cervix is? This is me about four years ago. It's like taking a lesson with a woman named Tammy Rubin. She's a certified fertility awareness and reproductive health educator. I can't guarantee anything for you. I can just tell you the science and what I've learned and what I want to touch on. So the events leading up to finding Tammy a chronicled in the first episode of bodies, sex hurts. You can listen back if you want all the details, but to summarize, when I was 24, sex became painful. I told my doctor, but I was dismissed. And I was having a really negative impact on my relationship with my then boyfriend. And then, through a friend, I learned that it could be the birth control pill that was causing the pain. I'd been on the pill since I was 18 and never given a second thought. But then I started looking into it more and yes, painful sex, as well as low sex drive and trouble lubricating were all potential side effects of the pill. So I went to an o-b-gyn specialist who confirmed that it was indeed the pill that was causing my issues. He told me to stop taking the pill, use a topical hormonal gel to get my hormone levels back to normal and go to pelvic floor physical therapy. I did all three things and after about 6 months, the pain went away. And honestly, my sex drive was better than it had ever been. And so after I got off the pill, I did not want to take hormonal birth control again. But I didn't want to get pregnant either. Condoms are fine contraceptives for the time being, but they didn't seem like a sustainable solution for the rest of my reproductive life. I started researching and came across this thing called the fertility awareness method. And at first I was like so the rhythm method that very unscientific way of guessing where you're at in your cycle. But as I learned during my sessions with Tammy, it's not the same thing as the rhythm method. Once you see that fluid, the fertile window is opening. And the change in cervical fluid marks the beginning of your fertile time. Turns out my body and the body of anyone with a menstrual cycle since two major signals over the course of a cycle. And if you can learn to read those signs, you can figure out on your own when you're fertile and when you're not fertile. This truly blew my mind. And so for the final episode of season three, I wanted to devote this episode to the fertility awareness method. How it works, how it can be used for contraception, why it's vital information for people trying to get pregnant and why it especially matters for people with polycystic ovarian syndrome or PCOS. I'm Alison berenger and from KCRW, this is bodies. And a heads up,

Tammy Rubin Tammy Pcos Alison Berenger
A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

The Experiment

01:06 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

"Count one malice murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You're gonna ask whoever just made it out first. Last week, when a judge in Georgia read the verdict, in the trial of three men who killed ahmaud Arbery. An unarmed black man. Count two felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You might have noticed there was a legal principle. Count three felony murder. That was repeated. Count four. Felony murder. Over and over. Account 5. Felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. Count 6. Last spring we did a story about felony murder. A legal rule you might not have heard of, that's applied in all different situations. And depending on who you talk to, it's either a tool for reform, or a barbaric rule that should be abolished.

Travis Mcmichael Ahmaud Arbery Georgia
A highlight from 360 | Lets Surfeit

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:29 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 360 | Lets Surfeit

"Objects. That discovery outshines the famous Sutton hoo burial ship, which had only offered up 37 coins to archeologists. By comparison, the massive scale of the lava tube treasure surpasses it all by far. We can start to make sense of that though when we realize just how long it took the hoarders to work their stockpile. It was the work of generations. You see, once archeologists started dating the objects they unearthed from the horde. They found that the oldest was placed there nearly 7000 years ago. In other places, they might not have survived. It was the extremely dry conditions of the lava tube that preserve them. But they're not just old. The most recent items date to about the middle of the 1600s. That means that to create this underground collection in the darkness of the lava tube, it wasn't just the work of generations, but the work of millennia. Not that it's a treasure that would attract anyone though because this is slightly unusual for a horde. It wasn't gold or coins, or even an ancient ship. It was a burial mound though. That's right. The collection was a horde of bones. They were densely packed into the lava tube, stretching away into the darkness. And as the researchers started to pull them out, test their ages, catalogued them and take notes. They began to see that this bone hoard contained pieces from over 14 different species and included the bones of cows, camels, horses, rodents, and a lot more. The study got really serious though when they checked the bones from markings. Sure, they found cuts, and maybe that's what you'd expect, but they also found the marks of teeth. These bones had been chewed. Some were even partially digested. That tells us that these bones weren't just a burial mound for the dead. And here's the thing. It wasn't like these were just the bones of cows and goats. Know what the researchers found gave them a chill. Because some of the bones were human. In fact, it's human skull fragments that were found among the other nod bones. But what archeologists guess about these skulls is even more gruesome than that. If we go by their best guess, they think these skulls were scavenged from graves. After the bodies of the dead were buried, someone from the clan of hoarders came through, sniffed them out and dug them up. Then they lugged them back to the lava tunnel where they added them to a treasure trove. After they gave those skulls a good chew, of course. And one of the archeologists even suggested that these skullcaps with tooth marks are the only thing to survive because the hoarders chewed the rest to splinters. The pieces of skull, candy, only survive because they didn't taste quite as good. All of that would be truly horrifying if the family packing the lava tube with bones for 7000 years was human. But as you may have guessed by now, this family was something else. No, the builders of this massive treasure trove weren't people, but hyenas striped hyenas that is. These days, they're a threatened species, but they used to be a mainstay of the region. So breathe a sigh of relief. But to me, the fact that it's a family of hyenas passing on the work of a major treasure trove from parent to child, that makes 7000 years of stockpiling skeletons, all the more impressive. This episode was made possible by the deadbolt mystery society. Are you a connoisseur of murder mysteries? Do you love the thrill of unraveling the clues, then the deadbolt mystery society is a great way to bring the mystery to life in your own home. The deadbolt mystery society is a monthly subscription box filled with a storyline of immersive scenarios intriguing characters and original compelling stories, and it's all delivered right to your door. Each box features interactive online components that bring each story to life, like puzzles, evidence, and interviews. According to BuzzFeed, it's the closest you'll get to fulfilling your dream of becoming Sherlock Holmes. The deadbolt mystery society boxes contain stand-alone stories, so you don't need to have multiple orders to compete your murder mystery storyline, and you can also choose from three 6 or 12 month subscription options for a greater discount. Ready to prove your skills, visit deadbolt mystery society dot com to get started. When you do be sure to use the promo code cabinet 20 and you'll save 20% on all subscription options plus single one time boxes. That's 20% off all subscription options plus single one time boxes at deadbolt mystery society dot com. Offer code

Deadbolt Mystery Society Sherlock Holmes
A highlight from The pandemic has put communities through a crash course in disaster response

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from The pandemic has put communities through a crash course in disaster response

"On rent and faced possible eviction. Many people who had never needed assistance before suddenly did. John Travis Marshall is an associate professor at Georgia state university college of law. He says the pandemic for state and local agencies to grapple with the shocking amount of need that can arise when any sort of disaster shuts down businesses, at least people jobless, even for a short time. They're beginning to collect data because the pandemic about the vulnerable populations with respect to housing and understand what the potential need is for a climate related disaster, another pandemic God forbid. He says COVID is also highlighted flaws in the systems that provide aid, and barriers that prevent people from applying for help. So we know that we've got a problem with delivering basic services, not just to the communities that have traditionally in historically been in need that actually do a substantially larger group of people. So communities have received an unwanted crash course in disaster response, and Marshall hopes it gives them data and motivation to better prepare for future crises, including those caused by a warming climate. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this,

John Travis Marshall Georgia State University Colle Covid Marshall Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from EP85. The truth about wild-harvested beauty

Green Beauty Conversations

01:19 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from EP85. The truth about wild-harvested beauty

"Now that naturals have become the norm for many beauty products, it stands to reason that the cosmetics industry is clamoring for interesting and exotic botanicals to make the latest and greatest claims for their formulations. Indeed, when you attend any cosmetics industry trade show, you tend to be bombarded with the hottest new plants and in the rarest pockets of the most far flung places around the world. But given that the beauty industry encourages us to consume endless personal care products, should we really be using that many rare and exotic plants? And if we do, should they be cultivated for us, potentially using land that could be used to feed people, or should we be using wild populations of plants? As you'll remember from my recent podcast on whether essential oils can ever be sustainable, we discussed this very topic. And it's one that I feel the beauty industry really isn't addressing properly yet. So what happens when beauty brands decide to go down the wild harvesting all wild sourced route for the plants in their formulations? How do we know that this is a sustainable way to source ingredients? One certification body called fair wild is working hard to look after our global wild plant resources and the people that depend on them. In this episode, we're going to pick apart how the beauty

A highlight from Lilly Singh: A Roast of the Jonas Brothers

Netflix is A Daily Joke

03:48 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Lilly Singh: A Roast of the Jonas Brothers

"It is such an honor to be part of the Jonas Brothers family roast. Man. You know, to be honest, I already feel like a member of the family because at Nick and Priyanka's wedding, Kevin and Joe both said to me, we're so happy you're marrying our brother Nick. If you don't know me, totally understandable. I'm Lilly Singh. What's up? Thank you. I love the Jonas Brothers so much that I came dressed as Kevin Jonas today. As you can see, we both shop at forever 21. Now, I got my start making comedy videos on YouTube. And since then, my career has been filled with ups and downs in an industry that's still predominantly white males. So yeah, I'm thrilled to finally be on a Netflix comedy special celebrating three white guys from New Jersey. Yeah. And the Jonas Brothers are so white and basic. They're like if white claw were a person. I mean, Joe is so white that when it was time to name his band, he couldn't even spell dance right. I did love the Jonas Brothers as a teen. You know, I had their posters on my walls. I mean, come on, they were hot, right? Yes. And they helped me figure out who I was as a person. And I'll never forget being a young girl in Canada, staring at a picture of the Jonas Brothers and thinking, maybe I'm into girls. This is fun. It's crazy that the Jonas Brothers are now under late 20s and 30s, and I can still grow more facial hair than all of you. Weird flex, but here we are. I know my strengths and weaknesses, okay? Speaking of weaknesses, Kevin is here. Kevin, real talk. Kevin is actually my favorite Jonas brother. Yes. Mine too. Because he makes you believe that anyone can be a pop star. When you see a picture of him next to Nick and Joe, you always think, wow, Nick and Joe are really close with their accountant. Nick, you'll always be the baby of the Jonas Brothers. And I don't know if you know this, but Nick can't even grow a beard. Yeah. That's why he married one. But it's hard not to love Nick Jonas. Am I right? Come on, look at him. Yeah. Nick is the dreamer. He's determined. He wants to be the best. Nick hopes to someday have a Grammy, an Emmy, an Oscar and a Tony. And he will, if he adopts four more dogs and names them, Grammy, Emmy Oscar and Tony. Hi, Joe. I didn't forget about you. Thank God. I mean, I did from 2008 to 2015, but not tonight. But it also, I am so honored to be here tonight and to be included as part of your family rose. Thank you so much for having me. Obviously, I'm a huge fan of Kenan Thompson. Thank you so much, everyone. Good night. Watch Lilly Singh roast the Jonas Brothers in the Jonas Brothers family roast, only on

Jonas Brothers Nick Joe Both Lilly Singh Kevin Kevin Jonas Priyanka JOE Netflix Youtube New Jersey Jonas Grammy Canada Emmy Oscar Nick Jonas Tony Emmy Oscar Kenan Thompson
A highlight from Centers for Disease Control Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:56 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Centers for Disease Control Museum

"Of 2020, Luis Shah was thinking a lot about the pandemic. But not our pandemic. The influenza pandemic of 1918. Because Luis a curator of the CDC museum, and an early 2020, she was getting ready for an exhibit on how the 1918 pandemic shaped science and society. But then news started circulating at the CDC. News about a brand new virus. One called COVID-19. And that was when they had to change their plans. By early March 2020, it was really clear that we had to get on top of it. And it has been so different from anything that we have collected and documented in the past. The collection at the CDC museum, it's like a time capsule of every public health crisis that's happened in the last century. Take, for example, the polio exhibit. Wander over there, and you'll see a big hulking iron lung. Which is wonderful mayonnaise Barton Apia lived in for over 40 years. That, I think, is a crowd favorite. Then there's a glass jug filled with this noxious looking yellow water. And that water comes from the Bellevue Stratford hotel in Philadelphia. In 1976, bacteria in that hotel's HVAC system caused an outbreak of a mysterious respiratory illness at a convention of the American legion. The disease was dubbed legionnaires disease. The legionella branch had a big gallon jug of this killer water and we finally talked them out of it and we have it on display at the museum. And I say it's priceless, but it has no value at all. There's also exhibits on the obesity epidemic in the United States. And on the health impacts of secondhand smoking. And I do want to do a shout out for a smallpox eradication collection. We have probably the most stellar smallpox eradication collection anywhere. You can even try on a hazmat suit if that's the kind of thing that strikes your fancy. I mean, come on. But it's one thing to track down an old iron lung or charm your colleagues out of a murky jug of water years after the crisis has abated. It's something else entirely to collect artifacts from a pandemic, you're currently living through. We were doing a rapid response collecting kind of approach that we were trying to collect materials in real time. But rapid response collecting is a little bit like asking curators to peer into a crystal ball. You have to predict what objects people in the future will really connect with. Which ones will help them really understand what it was like to live through this crisis? So when reports about COVID-19 first started coming in, Luis sprang into action and cast a wide net. In early 2020, when a cruise ship called the diamond princess, had an outbreak on board, the museum approached first responders and quarantine passengers, and asked them, hey, do you have anything for us? In response, they got passenger correspondence, even a copy of a diary. And when CDC artists created the first medical illustration of the SARS CoV-2 virus, the museum nabbed one of the 3D models that they worked from. And of course, there was one object in particular that soon became a really big deal. One that reminded Luis a lot of 1918. There was the whole issue in 1918 about masking and there were mass shortages. So the Red Cross were doing like these events where it was women that joined together to make masks. Sounds familiar. Flash forward to the PPE shortages in the spring of 2020, and Americans are once again breaking out their sewing machines. And the museum made sure to collect some of those homemade masks. And as the CDC also rushed to certify the safety of new companies that wanted to manufacture N95 masks, the museum stashed away some of those that passed the CDC's muster. Luis says museum's first realized that they needed a rapid response collecting strategy after September 11th. Like people would put up a fly or have you seen my son or you have seen my mother, those kinds of things. And they were collecting the teddy bears at the sites. And it's a kind of collecting ephemera that if you don't collect it right at the moment, it might disappear. In 2014, the CDC museum put this new rapid response collecting into action with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. And they knew they wanted to tell a story that was bigger than just the CDC's role. They wanted to represent all of the different perspectives in this collection that they were building, including artifacts from the community and religious leaders who stepped up to help fight the Ebola virus. We had aman and administer that actually shared copies of their Quran in the Bible that was mocked up with passages that documented why it was okay to have safe burial practices that were being recommended quarantine procedures. I will say in Ebola exhibit that was probably the most popular section of the entire exhibit. Included was a healer's bottle donated by the Sierra Leone indigenous traditional healers union. And it's wrapped with threads and cowry shells and was used to wash hands. The items showed that it wasn't enough for health officials just to promote safe practices. The messages also had to come from people who were trusted in their own communities. Rumors were an incredible issue in West Africa at the time, particularly early in the epidemic. Some people thought Ebola wasn't real. There was all sorts of things like, you know, this was purposeful, you know, people drinking bleach. That sounds sort of familiar, doesn't it? With the torrents of misinformation around COVID-19. The museum has had no trouble finding these kinds of artifacts to add to its collection. Things like anti vaccine posters. You might even say some of these artifacts come to them. Occasionally we'll have protesters in front of CDC and we have collected their materials. And they're sort of

CDC Luis Luis Shah Barton Apia Bellevue Stratford Hotel Legionnaires Disease Ebola Influenza Polio Smallpox Philadelphia Obesity Sars United States Red Cross West Africa Sierra Leone Indigenous Tradit Aman
A highlight from Teneshia Jackson Warner | Achieving Your Big Stretch Dream

Dose of Leadership

01:38 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Teneshia Jackson Warner | Achieving Your Big Stretch Dream

"Where I sit in my personal experience. And I know everyone journey will look different. But in my personal belief, it's a co creation with God and a higher power. And there's a God that dwells within us. You have to almost get in relationship with that voice. You know, that inner voice, this guiding you, that's not just you. That's connected to a higher power. Right. I mean, you can start getting in a dance with that in spirit, absolutely unbelievable. And that's where purpose. That's where, you know, your reason for being. Are you on the planet? All of that starts to shape up through that. So absolutely. Hey, welcome to the dose a show dedicated to deep and engaging conversations highlighting individuals that are in the pursuit of authentic and courageous leadership who poach life with insatiable curiosity bold action and common sense in these divisive and uncommon times. It's my hope that you take something away from each and every one of these conversations. Apply to your own life. As we all intentionally attempt to become the best we can possibly be, being drawn towards our purpose and calling committing to a life of service and making this place better than we found it and living true lives of consequence. Today's guest meets all of those criteria tanisha Warner and this is actually an episode on the other project that I produced that are podcasts that produce next level method. I wanted to share it here 'cause I'm trying to increase the awareness of my project next level with method with the owner of Matt lily. Teenager Warner is the author of the big stretch. She's the founder and CEO of

Tanisha Warner Matt Lily Warner
A highlight from The value of kindness at work | James Rhee

TED Talks Daily

04:04 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from The value of kindness at work | James Rhee

"Of that company's net assets. So this unexplained differential is named goodwill. And with it, accountants actually can make balance sheets balance. Now, of course, this isn't how most of us think of goodwill. We experience the more human definition of goodwill. And I remember very clearly when that definition first entered my life. It was 1976, and I was 5 years old. And I was sitting there one morning in kindergarten class when in walk the father and older siblings, one of my friends. And they handed me a present. They gave me a little toy, red helicopter. And in the moment, I didn't really understand why they were giving it to me. I just remember sensing that they were happy and sad at the same time. And it wasn't only until much later that I had my aha moment. That my friend had lost his mom recently, and that this gift, it was a thank you. Because I would often share my lunch with my friend on the many days that he would come to school without anyone of his own. In an over time, as things happen, I lost the toy. But I never forgot the lesson, especially how it made me feel. My friend's father had rewarded kindness without cheapening it. And he made it tangible with an object, and he made it human in that exchange. And he made it shareable with the story. And in doing all of this, he created real value out of thin air. By turning kindness into a scalable, collectively owned asset called goodwill. You know, and then for us for many of us, my life, the years just passed at a dizzying pace. And I collected a couple of fancy degrees. I became a dad myself three times over. And I found myself wheeling and dealing as an investment banker and a private equity investor for many years. And the lessons from that red helicopter, they seemed incredibly childish. And weirdly misguided in the world of business and finance. Because let's face it, non revenue generating investments in people that generally not measured, let alone rewarded. But something happened in the summer of 2013 that would forever change the way I thought about kindness. Goodwill. And their roles in reshaping business. I was on a series of just deflating board calls. Involving a failed investment in a company called Ashley Stewart. Ashley Stewart is a clothing retail that has served and employed primarily plus sized moderate income, black women, in neighborhoods across America since 1991. And I felt accountable to my former employer to my former investors to the 1000 plus employees at Ashley Stewart and frankly to myself because I had saved this company from a near death bankruptcy filing. Just three years prior and so this time I did something I took an action. I made a choice. I resigned as chairman of the board. And I agreed to serve as a first time CEO of this broken company. But I agreed to do it just for 6 months. I just wanted to avert a nasty liquidation. And then I wanted to come home and get on with my life. I had immediate pains of regret during those first few weeks that actually Stuart. The corporate headquarters was a converted warehouse. I just remember there being a lot of bugs. There was no Wi-Fi at the headquarters. And the stores didn't have computers. And because there was a lack of trust, there were vendors in the lobby demanding to be paid in cash upfront. And because of them, a lot of my employees were scared. And so I ended up having to hire an armed security guard to protect them. And I felt alone, like on every dimension you can think of.

Ashley Stewart America Stuart
A highlight from 681 Startup Airline Airbahn

Airplane Geeks Podcast

01:00 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 681 Startup Airline Airbahn

"Educate and inform you, explore and expand your passion for aviation and entertain you a little along the way. This episode in the news, the new airline startup air bun, Boeing's fighter bid is rejected by Canada. More on 5G and aviation signal interference, people trying to bring the darndest things on airplanes. What happens when you drop an iPhone from an airplane? In Australia and water landing that worked out okay and in a three 50 news peeling paint and a possible single pilot freighter, all that and more coming up right now. Welcome to the airplane geeks podcast. This is episode 681 of the show where we talk aviation. I'm max flight in joining

Boeing Canada Australia
A highlight from Ep 30: The Folsom Site - Killing Bison with Stone Points (Part 2)

Bear Grease

02:26 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Ep 30: The Folsom Site - Killing Bison with Stone Points (Part 2)

"There was so many questions about the site that were unanswered. That's why I went back 70 years later. On this episode of the bear grease podcast, we're going to the site of an ancient bison kill. The one found by George mcjunkin on part one of the series. After George's death, it would become known as the Folsom site. It was here that stone tools made by humans were found with a relic form of pleistocene bison and forever planted and indisputable data point into the debate of human antiquity in North America. We're going to talk with old Steve rinella of meat eater and the nation's leading expert on the fulsome site. Doctor David melzer, he literally wrote the book on Folsom after he went back there 70 years after its initial excavation and excavated it again to find more answers. So on this podcast, we're going back to fulsome. I really doubt you're going to want to miss this one. But first, I have an overarching question I'd like to present to you and it's this. What is the relevance of this knowledge about these ancient people in their lives? Why do we care? Is it merely entertainment to try to understand them or is there more? I'm in search of the answer. These things were herded, driven, into a box canyon, and then just rain down spears out of them and killed them. You can't make them go anywhere they don't want to go. We don't have to drive them in there. All we gotta do is wait till they go up in their own neuron. So I think it was an accident. My name is clay Newcomb and this is the bear grease podcast, where we'll explore things forgotten, but relevant. Search for inside and unlikely places and where we'll tell the story of Americans who live their lives close to the land. Presented by gear. American made purpose built hunting and fishing gear that's designed to be as rugged as the places we explore.

George Mcjunkin Steve Rinella David Melzer Folsom North America George Clay Newcomb
A highlight from AI Today Podcast: Interview with Albert King, Chief Data Officer of the Scottish Government

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:34 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from AI Today Podcast: Interview with Albert King, Chief Data Officer of the Scottish Government

"The AI today podcast produced by cognac cuts through the hype and noise to identify what is really happening now in the world of artificial intelligence. Learn about emerging AI trends, technologies, and use cases from cognitive analysts and guest experts. Hello, and welcome to the AI today podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen mulch. And I'm your host Ronald mills are in. Thank you for joining us again on our AI today podcast. We are now in our 5th season. That is we've been recording for over four years. We celebrated our fourth anniversary earlier this month in September of 2021 if you're listening to us later on. And well over 200 plus episodes. And we've been focusing on the challenges and the issues of making AI work within enterprises and organizations of all types. And you've heard us interview organizations from large banks and financial service institutions, pharmaceutical companies, especially in the past year as they've been going through the pandemic and really reworking their organizations from top to bottom. And as well as, as well as government organizations in the United States federal state and local level internationally Protestant review, lord Tim Clement Jones, the UK House of lords and Australian folks in Hungarian folks and companies in countries from all around the world. It's very interesting that we're all kind of moving this shipped forward. It's actually kind of nice how international artificial intelligence truly is. And that there really isn't such a centricity of the technology as maybe there has been what social media and other things Silicon Valley centric or computing and that's where stuff. New AI is really properly very international. And it is on that sort of note that I am really thrilled to introduce our guest presenter a guest host sorry guest. Featured guest for our AI today podcast. And that is Albert King, who is the chief data officer of the Scottish government. We are sort of thrilled totally thrilled to have him here. So thank you so much Albert for joining us on AI today podcast. Well, I am delighted to be here on apparently in such exalted company as well, what a treat. So excited to be here. Yeah, we're excited to have you today and for this interview. So we'd like to start by having you introduce yourselves and tell us a little bit about your background and also about your current role at as CDO of the Scottish government. Our listeners know that we have produced country level strategy reports on how different countries their AI adoption and their AI strategy. And so we're really excited to have you here to share what Scotland is doing as well. So yeah, so please introduce yourself to our listeners. Yeah, thanks very much. So I'm essentially my job is to make real Scottish government's vision for data that you systematically to save time money and lives and that's all about contributing to making Scotland wealthier fairer and greener. So no small job then. And so is the center of excellence with data in government, my teams are committed to helping us realize that vision. And that's really through, I guess, three things through the platforms that we've provide to support the sort of end to end data journey for analysts across government and public bodies in Scotland. Secondly, really about providing specialist expertise and analytical skills, particularly in areas where those difficult to acquire or particular kind of deep expertise. And thirdly, really around providing the policies and governance that we've put in place to deliver all of that. So I would look at peace. So yeah, as I say, we're making that vision real through the services we provide in the policy and strategies we create and deliver. Ultimately, then to help us to achieve the outcome set out in our national performance framework. So full disclosure on the date professional to trade. So I would tinker with all this technology just for fun if people like me, but it turns out it's really about the ultimately the social economic and environmental value that's creates. And the national performance framework. So our purpose as a government to create a more successful country in Scotland and interestingly actually picking up on some of what you were saying earlier. I definitely think this is an agenda where we can connect apart from the other things I said about wealthier fair and greener to that international agenda because this is really and one of the things that is really clear is that there are challenges around this technology that really do have that international dimension to that opportunity to demonstrate our international contribution and that we're not we're looking at nation language very important as well. So linking all of that back then to AI that is a big feature of our AI strategy that NPF at national performance framework woven through it connects those outcomes and it really is the AI strategy really is about putting people and society at its heart and achieving those outcomes through the adoption and use of that particular sort of data driven technology. So yeah, it's fantastic. And that's really very interesting. I think our listeners might be really very interested in the NPF the national performance framework because people are looking for frameworks in general to help guide whether they're multinational organizations and agencies or their country level agencies or organizations or even businesses of all types and sizes. We're all trying to figure out how to really make data really work in a way that's beneficial to the organization and to our customers and to our citizens and to everyone in the society. And I think that's an interesting place now. People are paying much more attention to data. I think nowadays, did the average person that we might have in the past. And as meant as Kathleen mentioned, we have covered AI strategies from Afghanistan Zimbabwe and every country in between, you know, Botswana and Cape Verde and Colombia and Hungary and it's interesting. Really, most nations are thinking about their countries positioning with regards to AI at the production or the consumption level. So in March of 2021, earlier this year, we know that Scotland published its own AI strategy and we talked a little bit about that just now. But maybe you could tell our listeners a little bit about sort of what led up to the creation. And a little bit about the strategy as well as to kind of how Scotland feels it's participating in playing within this global ecosystem of data forward organizations. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, so the background AI strategy, I guess. And the genesis of it, if you like, it was a recognition of first of all some strengths, maybe that Scotland has an AI, so we've got excellent research institutions here in Scotland. University in Scotland do some of the often recognized in top rankings for research. There was also a sort of piece around the innovative companies that we've got in Scotland. So really transforming, I guess the potential that that research creates into the economic value and also actually innovative public services that are looking to adopt this technology. And as you know, as you were saying, turn the technology into real, in this case, social value. But there was also a recognition of the risks and indeed fears that sometimes are associated with this technologies. And so that came together really, I guess, as the impetus that drove us to act and ministers are cabinet secretary for finance access to take forward the development of an AI strategy. I mean, really asking us to put citizens at the center of that to maximize the value for AI and really I suppose with the driving thinking that we would only see that value realized if it's adopted widely and underpinned by confidence and trust in the technology. So

Scotland Scottish Government Kathleen Mulch Ronald Mills Lord Tim Clement Jones House Of Lords And Australian Albert King Albert United States UK NPF Cape Verde Botswana Kathleen Zimbabwe Colombia Hungary Afghanistan Cabinet
A highlight from S13E16: How To Have A Healthy Relationship w/ Connor Beaton & Vienna Pharaon

Dateable Podcast

03:25 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from S13E16: How To Have A Healthy Relationship w/ Connor Beaton & Vienna Pharaon

"The podcast is an insider's look into modern dating that The Huffington Post calls one of the top ten podcasts about love and sex. On each episode, we'll talk to real daters about everything from sex parties to sex droughts, date fails to diaper fetishes and first moves to first loves. I'm your host ue shoe, former dating coach turned dating sociologist. You also hear from my co host and producer Julie Kraft chick as we explore this crazy dateable world. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of the dateable podcast where we are full and we are ready to tackle the rest of the year. Now that we're done with Thanksgiving, this is where all the holiday shit starts happening, right? This is the beginning of it all, and it's also the beginning of cuffing season. Oh, yes. We are here to help you. Through cuffing season, consider us your sherpas through all the cuffing that's about to happen. Relationships, they begin and they end around the holidays. We know because we've both been there. And that is our mission with a table podcast. Let's get to the bottom of these behaviors and patterns that we see. And so we can be better equipped for when things happen. And we are so excited about our episode today. We are talking about what it means to have a healthy relationship. So we have back a fan favorite. We have Connor beatin. He was on season 12 episode one socially distant yet eventually available, one of our top rated episodes, I believe. And we are lucky to have him joined by his wife, Vienna ferrin, who is a very popular marriage and family therapist of mindful MFT. So we're super excited to have both of them together. And I think this concept of healthy relationship is something that's tossed around a lot. We've definitely said that before, because I think a big part of dateable is that we want to create the relationships that work for us ultimately. And a lot of us don't want to repeat our family, our parents, relationship, potentially, divorces that have happened. I think we're all kind of out there to have a healthy relationship. That's a term that gets maybe as buzzed as emotionally available at another probably neck and neck this, too. It's also kind of like saying I'm looking for a nice person to date. It's like it's the status quo. You should be wanting a healthy relationship. And if you do have a healthy relationship, it shouldn't feel like your unicorn. Yeah. That should be what all of us are in is a healthy relationship, but why is this so hard to identify what a healthy relationship is? Is, for example, some of us didn't grow up with great examples. I'm a good relationship is you don't understand what healthy you have a means for me. I had no idea what love even meant 'cause that was never a word that was used in my family. And so when you have to relearn all of this from the beginning, it's a really scary thing. It's also very exciting because it means you get to carve out what it means to have a healthy relationship for you specifically. Yeah, I mean, I think modern data is extremely dysfunctional also. So I think thank you. Thank you, Monday. Obvious. Without you, there wouldn't be us. But I think that's why would you do there is this your site is set on a healthy relationship.

Julie Kraft Connor Beatin Vienna Ferrin Huffington Post
A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:54 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

"I was going to have to. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Today, our guest is Brooke Shields. She has been a household name almost since birth from doing her first commercial at 11 months old to a Calvin Klein genes campaign at 14. She achieved notoriety through blockbuster movies in the 1980s, like the Blue Lagoon and endless love. Since then, Brooks becoming a Broadway actress starred in sitcoms and TV dramas, written two books and raised two daughters. And now, she is starring in and producing the upcoming Netflix Christmas movie a castle for Christmas. Brooke, we are so excited to have you. Welcome. Oh, thank you. Thank you for welcoming me. So before we get into the conversation, we like to warm up. We're going to do a lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Let's do it. What is a secret hobby or skill that you have? My secret hobby is needlepoint. Oh, that's a really good one. I am needle pointing a backgammon board. Like I have to be on the set doing something like some kind of craft or something. Okay. What is the last show that you binge watched? Oh, I haven't seen it, but I heard I would really like it. Oh, please, Rhonda walk. Okay, my next question, you have starred in many things that are beloved shows and movies of mine. But one of my most favorite roles you've done is when you were on Broadway and you played Rizzo in Greece. Oh my goodness. How old were you? You must have been a baby. I was a child, but I remember vividly. What is your favorite line or song from Greece? There are worse things I could do. Fair. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? About 20 minutes ago. Where did you negotiate? I negotiated someone's fee for a perspective job. How does taking time to slow down fuel you to move forward? I never slowed down in my life till more recently in the past few years. And the fuel that I get from just doing something healing for myself sometimes that can just be hanging out with a friend or watching movies or doing something where there's where the regular noise is stopped. I find that I reemerge from that even stronger and more powerful. I just it's almost like that time the energy starts and it starts building up. Okay, we're going to move into the meat of our show. You started working when you were you couldn't even walk. You were less than a year old. And then you became famous as a teenager. You've talked a lot publicly about what your family dynamic was and what a unique childhood you had. But what was your support system? How did you basically stay normal? There's a few elements that I think my mother set in motion. She never moved us out of the east coast. We never went and moved to Hollywood and pursued all of that, which is rushing to high school and basically only being educated onset. And I think that even just that element for sure gave me a perspective and a more grounded way of being in the world. And when that's all you know, regular great schools, regular high schools. I think you really do have an understanding that the world you may inhabit at certain times is not real. It's just not your real world. It's kind of crazy. It is something that you can go in and out of to a certain extent. And the other piece is my mom always made sure I had someone my own age around me. So I always had a partner in crime. You know, I never felt like I was the only kid in a sea of adults. And my parents never spoke ill of the other. I mean, they got divorced when I was 5 months old. My father's family is so the opposite of any way that I grew up with my mother or my working life. And I was talking about this today, I've got this movie coming out and it's coming out the day after Thanksgiving. And everybody in my life outside of my family, they're all going to watch it. And I know for a fact that I'm going to get to my family in Florida. And it's not even going to be mentioned. And it's funny because my feelings aren't hurt or anything, but that's how I grew up. My youngest sister grew up with not an inkling of what I did. And it wasn't until she got much older and friends of hers would say things like that's your sister. And it's so interesting that sort of power of that kind of compartmentalizing. And sometimes it's not good, but it really served me. You know, I'm going to go down to be like, no one's going to watch my movie, but it's okay. Well now because they're going to listen to this podcast. No, but it's like, you know, and I never hurt my feelings that actually just helped me understand that, you know, it's not everything. It's not the only thing. And if I sat and said my sister down and said, look, this is really important to me. Please watch it. They would watch it. You know, it's interesting. On this show, Danielle and I were cofounders and we're friends and we talk about how unique it is that ten years in, we're sorely friends and cofounders of a business. We've had people on here that also are cofounders and friends or work with family or work with spouses and just kind of the unique dynamic of bringing work home, home to work into your personal life. You and your mom in particular were infamously just this tight type duo for so much of your career where she was your manager. She was with you for all of your early success. I would love to understand how you dealt with that, both the good part and maybe the parts that you're like, I wouldn't repeat. Your advice to those who think about working with family or working with those kind of closer to them. You know, I think it's always brought no matter how you look at it and boundaries are the most important thing. On the one hand, I think family you can trust more than anybody. Friends, family. On the other hand, if money is involved, that's when it gets tricky. I think full communication has to happen. I was very enmeshed with my mom. I knew nothing other than being in this industry that I was in kind of it happened to both of us and not knowing any other way in hindsight. I think it would have been healthier to have a bit more of a delineation between my professional life and my mom, however the way she protected me in an industry that basically devours its young. You know, I never had a me too moment when all the other young people were, you know, I was she was so avaricious sleep

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Greece Brooke Shields Calvin Klein Rizzo Netflix Rhonda Brooke Brooks East Coast Hollywood Florida Danielle
A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on Elton John

Trivia With Budds

03:36 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on Elton John

"Got some great stuff in there. I've been nonstop talking about this brand new book. It's called trivia with buds, pop culture puzzles, volume one, Mia's Bob Ross on the cover, painting my logo on a canvas 23 brand new puzzles. Trivia quizzes. Basically written versions of this podcast for you to go figure out great stuff in there like what's the theme trivia snake? The numbers game, pop culture, math and tons tons more. Go check all those out. They've never been recorded anywhere or posted anywhere or hosted anywhere. They're just for the book, and I'm going to try and do that at least a couple of times a year because the reception to the book has been fantastic. I only have about 20 left. And just yesterday's episode I posted that would be giving away some pin sets from last holiday season from drew with the next 5 orders. And those went off the shelves right away. And people messaged me a shout out to my friend, Yolanda, who said, hey, I hope I can get one. She was the last person to get one of those pin sets that I sent out today with the book. You can get the physical copy, ten bucks on the store, 12 two bucks for shipping, so about 12 bucks total or you can get the digital download, which somebody bought today for the first time, which is $7. You can print it off at home. You can print as many copies as you want, give it out to your friends and family for Halloween for the holidays for Christmas time or or whatever you want. It's fun for you. You can print just a few puzzles out from the book and solve it home or use them as a trivia host for handouts at your next trivia night. Whatever you want to do, the book is yours when you download it. There's also a great Cobra Kai T-shirt that says answer first answer right no Googling with the Cobra Kai logo and my logo splattered across it. We have a mister of the night, which is like the mistress of the night, elvira, parody T-shirt. We have a mister of the night coffee mug. We have a me as buddy the elf in the movie elf, red crew neck sweatshirt. We have a unisex 80s bouncer T, which is Mia's Patrick Swayze roadhouse and a couple different colors there and a zip up hoodie or a throw over hoodie. So check all that stuff out. It is Etsy dot com slash shop slash trivia with buds and you'll find a gift in there for your friend or loved one who likes this podcast. Today's episode is about Elton John and you are going to love it. Written by Luke McCain, and we're jumping into those questions right now. Here we go. Here it is around on Elton John. Question number one, what is Elton John's real first in last name? Number one, what is Elton John's real first and last name? Number one. Number two, who played Elton John in the 2019 biopic rocket man. Number two played Elton John in the 2019 biopic Rocketman. Number three, who was Elton John married to from 1984 to 1988, who was out and married to from 84 to 88. Four, the song candle Nguyen was rewritten and performed by Elton in 1997 as a tribute to Princess Diana, who was the song originally written about.

Bob Ross Elton John Yolanda Elvira Luke Mccain Patrick Swayze Nguyen Elton Princess Diana