Road Trips

Deep dives for long drives, waiting rooms and passing time without wasting precious minutes. Chock-full of intriguing short stories from a far-flung range of topics - hear the latest in Artificial Intelligence, True Crime thrillers, lessons in Leadership and much more, to keep your inquisitive mind satisfied as the miles fly by.

A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on Complete the Quote

Trivia With Budds

02:31 min | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on Complete the Quote

"Would it be and welcome to another episode of the trivia with buds, podcast, I'm your host Ryan buds. Thanks for checking out the show. It is December 3rd as of the time of this recording. 2022, getting ready for the holidays, putting up lights decorating the inside of the house and generally cleaning up for people coming to visit. Hope you are having fun, cozy times at home listening to trivia, playing trivia, playing board games, and eating, drinking, and being Mary. We have a fun episode today for Kim Brown, who wanted a quote based episode for her Patreon pick. You can join Kim over on Patreon dot com slash trivia with bud support the show and everybody who is a subscriber in the month of December will get a free copy of my new book, pop culture puzzles, volume two, the printed version. I will send that to you. As soon as I get them done, hopefully in the next couple of weeks here. And you will enjoy it. If you love this show, it'll be 23 brand new quizzes. You never played anywhere else in written form for you to keep in your purse or your glove box or what have you to pass time. When you need it. Before we jump into the quote round, we have three random questions from a trivial pursuit, pop culture two edition game. Here's your first one. What late night TV host continued to predict well into 2005, what will happen in the year 2000? The answer there, Conan O'Brien, one of my favorite segments on that show. Conan O'Brien, your next one, what threesome are featured on the album three generations of Hank. That threesome would be, Hank Williams, Hank Williams, junior, and Hank Williams, the third, all three of the generations of Hank there. And your last one here, speaking of thirds, who was the third actor to play James Bond in three movies. The answer there is Pierce Brosnan, Pierce Brosnan. So a little bit of warmup trivia before we jump into complete the quote, which we're gonna do right now, here we go. All right, fill in the missing words from these famous quotes, a lot of them from TV shows, here's number one, from Stranger Things, Friends, don't blank. Number one, from Stranger Things, friends don't blank, fill in that blank by completing

Ryan Buds Kim Brown Hank Williams Brien Conan BUD KIM Mary Hank Pierce Brosnan James Bond
A highlight from Internet Advertising Bureau Media Lab

Data Skeptic

00:48 sec | 9 hrs ago

A highlight from Internet Advertising Bureau Media Lab

"Today's interview is with Anthony catheter, CEO of the IAB tech lab. I have been casually aware of the IAB that's the Internet advertising bureau for quite some time. When I first started doing things on the web and when those things involved advertising, I somehow knew that the standard sizes of what was the size of that or that size of that was defined by the IAB. So I knew them for that ad size standard. And when I started doing research for our ad tech season, this organization that had just been there in the background for me personally all this time was something I had to look up. And standards would be the right word if you've got to choose one to sum up the IAB. Our conversation today gets into how that works and specifically the RTB protocol for real-time bidding and the vast standard for video ad serving. All that more coming right up.

IAB Anthony Catheter
A highlight from AT#827 - Travel to Tanzania on Safari

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:54 min | 11 hrs ago

A highlight from AT#827 - Travel to Tanzania on Safari

"Today the amateur traveler talks about wildebeest and zebra, lions and leopards, bee eaters and Pratt and Kohl's as we go on safari in Tanzania. Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Kristensen, let's talk about Tanzania. I'd like to welcome the show Jane hurling from capistrano beach, California, also you can find her on Instagram at bio prof, but Jane has come to talk to us not about capistrano beach but about Tanzania. Jane, welcome to the show. Thank you. And what's your connection with Tanzania? We went this last summer of 2022 for the second time. gone about 9 years ago and we've been on several safaris since, but we wanted to return to a country that we wanted to visit some of the same places and then there's so much new to explore and we did a little exploring and new parks on this trip as well. And when you say parks we're going to do this is going to be about a safari type trip safari type of vacation, which is how many people are experiencing Tanzania. If you go way, way back in the archives to the first year of amateur traveler, you can find a trip that I did that it's in two parts, two episodes, one that's more of a volunteer trip and one that's more the parks. And we've done several other safari type experiences in Tanzania since. But it was time to do it again. Absolutely. And this wasn't a COVID postponed trip. It was a after the worst of COVID past and people were traveling a lot more. We want to get back at it. And we wanted it specifically to see the wildebeest migration again in the Serengeti. And I think that starts to answer the question of why should someone go to Tanzania? Oh my. Let's see animals. I'm a biology professor retired now. So for me, vacations are often about the wildlife and the scenery and this never disappoints. There's animals big and small. That you see all of the day when you're out on safari. When you talk about the wildebeest migration, you were there for what we call the Great Migration, which happens a couple times a year, and I don't remember exactly what times a year it happens when you wish your trip. We were there in August and they were migrating generally north, but what happens is you have this huge population of wildebeest, along with some zebras, as is correctly pronounced what we call zebras and the two species intermingle and they move generally north and then at the

Tanzania Jane Chris Kristensen Capistrano Beach Kohl Pratt California
A highlight from Ep 170: The Top Nonprofit Sector Trends and Takeaways of 2022 (with Stacy Palmer)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:26 min | 11 hrs ago

A highlight from Ep 170: The Top Nonprofit Sector Trends and Takeaways of 2022 (with Stacy Palmer)

"So it's that time of year again. The time when you look back at the top, this or the top that, and so I figured I should do my own version of that. I often encourage clients to take time in December to look back at the year that was and ask themselves, what are the lessons learned this year that will inform my goals in my strategies for the upcoming year? So I decided we should take that question and pose it looking at the nonprofit sector as a whole. I asked Stacy Palmer, the editor of the chronicle of philanthropy to join me in this endeavor. Chronicle lives up there at 35,000 feet and Stacy has a vantage point about this sector that few others have. It's also been an interesting year for Stacy and the folks at the chronicle as they shift from reporting about us to being one of us. Moving from a for profit publication to a nonprofit organization. And yes, she will tell you that she is learning that being a nonprofit CEO is no walk in the park. As you listen to the two of us chat about the big nonprofit takeaways of the year and listen to Stacy's keen insights, consider them in the context of your own leadership, your own organization, the your own sector within the sector. What have you learned this year? That will help you move in the direction of greater impact in 2023. Here's hoping that our conversation today ignites you to engage in one of your own. Greetings and welcome to nonprofits are

Stacy Palmer Stacy
A highlight from Hasan Minhaj: A Joke about Saudi Arabia

Netflix is A Daily Joke

07:24 min | 18 hrs ago

A highlight from Hasan Minhaj: A Joke about Saudi Arabia

"And on Patriot Act, I was in control. So I thought, hey. Why not go after everybody? It's my show, right? Dictators, autocrats, religion, that's why. When Washington post journalist Jamal Khashoggi got murdered inside of that Saudi consulate, I thought, hey, this could be our first episode. And I had a crazy take. You remember this? I was like, Saudi hear me out. It's your boy, Hasan. Hot take. I think murder is bad. In the kingdom was like, you have gone too far, minhaj. Netflix under fire today after its decision to pull an episode of a comedy show that was critical of crown prince Mohammed bin Salman. Saudi Arabian officials cited article 6 of their anti cybercrime law. I was like, wait, what law did I break? It was an Arabic, so I had to cut and copy it, put it in Google Translate. And it turns out I broke article 6 of their cybercrime law sentencing me. To 5 years in Saudi prison, I know. Somehow CNN got the story, right? Now it's crazy as that sounds. Here's where the story gets even crazier. That wasn't the first time I messed with the Saudis. I haven't talked about this publicly. But way before the whole Netflix kerfuffle. I tried to interview The Crown prince of Saudi Arabia. I'm serious. He came to New York City, and he was taking all these weird meetings. Dude, he met with Michael Bloomberg at the Starbucks in Times Square. Do you remember this? Look at Bloomberg's goofy ass. He's just like, welcome to Starbucks. Your highness? If you want to take a shit the code is two, three, three, two, my least. All right. Crown prince in New York. Your boy in New York. Let me shoot my shot. Let me slide in the DMs. It'll be funny. Now Bina has a slightly different take. Because she has a PhD. And I do PowerPoint comedy. So she's like Hasan. Do not antagonize the Saudis. It's dangerous. I go, I know. She goes, I'm serious. Don't do the interview. And I go, I won't. And I meant it. But then she left the room. And I'm like, come on, let me write a letter to Santa. So I was like, you're kidding on a Saturday. My name is Ahmed. I have Internet. They hit me back immediately. Well, this seems cordial. Now look, I'm not an idiot. I didn't tell being about this, okay? Not a moron. I'm not going to tell my wife. I told Jim, one of our producers. Now, I have to be honest with you guys. There is a slight difference between an embassy and a consulate, but fun fact, you're not supposed to get murdered in either. So me and Jim, we go from New York City, all the way down to Washington, D.C., three blocks away, embassy of Saudi Arabia. Me and Jim, we're about to walk in. I go, Jim, let's fucking go. Let's fucking go. Let's interview the Saudis. They said, huh, fucking gas prices, let's fuck with. He's like, stop dancing, you idiot. We're about to walk into a new country. You moron. Show some respect. I go, Jim. You show some respect. This is the goddamn United States of America. Yeah, they're not gonna fuck with me, John. I'm like you. Citizen. He's like, stop grabbing your nuts. It's literally a new country. When we walk through that door, it's like a green tunnel in Super Mario Brothers. You understand? We're in America. We walk in Saudi Arabia. America, Saudi Arabia, and it really was like that. It was like, Delaware. Saudi Arabia. We walk in it was Saudi gold, chandelier, marble, Indian servants. I'm like, bye bye. You did it. Indian servants. I mean the authenticity just. Because you know this in the Middle East, Indians, Pakistanis, bengalis, Sri lankans, where the help. Right? Or the Mexicans in the Middle East? Even brown people have their own brown people. That's how those buildings got there. The only people that love shitting on Indians more than the Saudis are the Brits. The only difference is we love when the Brits shit on us. They're Indian uncles here tonight that are like wow London. Look at London man. My cousin lives in London. Look at the queen. I'm like, fuck the queen. What are you talking about? Bro in my mom's bedroom. This is true. In my mom's bedroom. She has a wedding photo of me and being an honor wedding day directly next to that photo. It's a photo of Princess Diana. I go mama. She's been dead since 1997. I'm your son. How are we the same? She's like Hasan, you don't know princess die. I'm like, do you, mom? She was so beautiful. And her mother in law was mean. And her husband was cold. I'm like, ma? Are you describing your marriage? So we're in the Saudi embassy. Me and Jim were sitting down. Saudi delegation walks in. 15 men, they represent the Saudi royal family. They set the gas prices. How did the delegation circles me? Sits across from us. Mister menhaj. Thank you so much, for your letter. Why do you want to interview The Crown prince? Have you ever even been to the gulf? Jim's like, don't be funny. I go Jim. Why would I be funny? Yes. So one

Saudi Arabia Jamal Khashoggi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salm Hasan JIM Netflix Starbucks Washington, D.C. New York City Washington Post Michael Bloomberg Bina Crown Prince New York Times Square CNN America Bloomberg Ahmed Google
A highlight from 696 For the Love of Guidebooks; The Gulf; Greatest Art In Europe

Travel with Rick Steves

01:07 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 696 For the Love of Guidebooks; The Gulf; Greatest Art In Europe

"What goods and old outdated guidebook for Peter finds it's an entryway into another world. It's partly the map since the detail it's also thrilling to unfurl a map from a 1923 blue guide to London. The former publisher of timeout points out that travel guides have been around since ancient Greece. Jack Davis grew up along the Gulf Coast of Florida. He suggests we rethink how we treat what he calls America's sea, and knowing the gulf intimately, I knew the gulf was more than just this oil supply or this hurricane alley as it is often portrayed in when you plan to visit the exquisite art in Europe, be sure to include its great architecture. In Ireland, atkin include prehistoric megaliths aligned with the winter's holsters. A beam of light comes shining through that little tunnel and lights up the sacred chamber inside. Let's explore the world together. It's travel with Rick Steves. We're swapping tales about our love of guidebooks and their impacts on our lives with the former publisher of time out in just a minute on today's travel

Jack Davis Gulf Coast Peter Greece London Atkin Florida America Ireland Europe Rick Steves
A highlight from Talk with ATC and ME - Aviation Podcast

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

01:27 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Talk with ATC and ME - Aviation Podcast

"Streams, whatever you want to call them on YouTube. We're starting to do these on our clips channel. So if you didn't know that the finer points has a clips channel, we do. And that's where you can find these, or if you want to get notified, sign up for our mailing list. You can also see archives of this kind of thing on Patreon itself. But in any case, I'm going to give it to you here in pretty much its raw form because the conversation was awesome the other night we had some great people attending and asking good questions. So I think it's something we can all benefit from without any further ado here is myself and RH talking air traffic controller to pilot. Thanks for joining us again on the live. I have a very special guest tonight. I would like to welcome our H from the podcast opposing bases. Our age is an air traffic controller who works in both tracon and air traffic control towers. His podcast, along with his partner AG, is all about air traffic control issues. If you guys haven't checked that out, you should definitely do so. And today, we're going to go through some questions and also do a little lightning round here with our H so welcome to the show. Thanks for having me, Jason. It's great to be back. Yeah, it's always good to have you on. Yeah, and you know, I've always thought there's not I've probably said this to you before, but there's not a great dialog or hasn't been traditionally between pilots and controllers. So I think it's particularly important that you are here

Youtube AG Jason
A highlight from Mental Health in America: In Depth with Dr. Rahul Gupta

After The Fact

04:55 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Mental Health in America: In Depth with Dr. Rahul Gupta

"Treatment for it, from doctor Raoul Gupta, who leads the office of national drug control policy, the first physician in that role. Doctor Raoul Gupta, thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me, Dan. You are the director of the office of national drug control policy. So tell us what that office is and what it does. Congress has given us statutory authority to look over all of the drug control budget, which is about $40 billion across 18 federal agencies. So our job basically is to make sure that we have a strategy which is the president's strategy. And it's implemented in a way that we can have an impact in reducing substance use, impacting lives, of course, and coordinating the spend of that money across the federal government as well as impacting resources at state or local levels. You are the first physician to serve in this office, which is been in existence now for what two or three decades. Your perspective as a physician, how does that aid you in your work? I have walked the talk as they say. I've been able to practice for the last 25 years in rural towns as little as 1800 people to large cities as much as 25 million people. It has allowed me to really understand addiction substance use disorder and whole host of public health challenges that informs my work every single day at a time when the need has never been more urgent or more important. I want to talk about that urgency. Let's talk about what's going on with substance use in America. For the first time, more than a 100,000 people died from an overdose in a 12 month period. What's gotten us to that point? Well, clearly there are several factors, one of those, of course, is that we've had a consistent rise which really began in early 2000s with prescription opioids and then transformed and transitioned into heroin ivy use and then fentanyl now we're seeing the transition from plant based or organics to synthetics, which far more dangerous little we're seeing the most dynamic drug supply environment in this nation's history. And we've had some situations beyond our control, which is the pandemic, of course, with the rising levels. It has escalated during that time. We've seen isolation within mental health challenges like never before. All of these things have combined together to create the perfect storm where an American is perishing every 5 minutes around the clock. We've been speaking this whole season about growing concern about mental health in the country. Let's talk about that connection between mental health and substance use disorders. You've been vocal about half the people, I guess, who suffer from substance use disorders, have some sort of co occurring mental health issue. It's really important for us to see the connections and understand the connections because we can not treat one and have success without understanding the other. Earlier this year in the State of the Union, President Biden mentioned the unity agenda and top of that was both beating the opioid crisis as he called it as well as the mental health crisis. These are, as you rightly point out, bidirectionally connected with each other. So it's really important for healthcare providers for the general public policymakers and others to understand that there is this link and we must work on all of these at the same time. There's a stigma that can be associated with both substance use disorder and with mental health issues. That's not just societal, but also plays out in the medical community. How do we get even the medical professionals to get beyond that as someone who has been practicing medicine for 25 years? I've seen that. I've seen this in practice myself. The medical community is not immune to stigma. In fact, if you go back a hundred years, we used to have very similar type of stigma with cancer. We have done a lot of work, especially in research and development and understanding stigma around cancer. I think we have hope. When it comes to mental health and addiction and substance use disorders. But we have to be clear about this. This is something that not only affects individual societies and communities but also infects healthcare the same way and there are ways to go forward. When we talk about the present strategy, one of the things we talk about is removing the stigma. It starts everything from language, the way we speak, the words we use, the agency's names, to all the way to curricula. We want to make sure that addiction medicine is something that is being taught as core curriculum and all health related professions. So it becomes intrinsically part of that. It does seem like we're making progress in that area in society. The fact that we're doing a series about this is just indicative of the broadening national conversation. And it's a positive sign. Yeah, it certainly is. And I'm thrilled about that. Obviously, we're not making progress as quickly as I would have liked to.

Raoul Gupta Office Of National Drug Contro President Biden DAN Federal Government Congress State Of The Union America Cancer
A highlight from Mothers: Alice Salomon

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:16 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Mothers: Alice Salomon

"Alice was born on April 19th, 1872 to a middle class Jewish family in Berlin, Germany. Her childhood was blotted by several personal tragedies. Including the deaths of several of her siblings when they were still young. Her family was never very religious, but after Alice's father died in 1886, her mother encouraged her children to restore their Jewish faith. Those efforts didn't work. Alice would eventually convert to Christianity as an adult. Alice finished school when she was 15 years old. She desperately wanted to go to university, but there were very few educational opportunities for middle class women in Germany. She decided to attend a small art school to study needlework. In 1893, Alice joined a women's group dedicated to relief work. Through her service, she became aware of the everyday injustices of poverty. In her autobiography, Alice described feeling a new sense of shame about her own family's relative prosperity. During this time, she often argued with her mother about whether they could part with the pictures on their walls and the rugs on their floors. She wanted to give everything to the people she felt truly deserved it. Alice wrote during the first decade of my work, I could not see a man doing heavy and dirty labor in the streets without wondering why he did not attack people like me who were free from drudgery. These years were absolutely formative in shaping the rest of Alice's life. In 18 99, she launched the first one year training course for social workers in Europe. She was also publishing articles on a variety of cultural issues, which helped her finally land a place at Berlin university in 1902. She earned a doctorate in 1906 and wrote her dissertation on gender pay inequality. Alice later established the German conference of schools for social work for women. By 1920, the field had gained official recognition. And women were earning diplomas in social work. She also helped found the German academy for women's social and educational work and later became the first president of the international committee of schools of social work. After her success in promoting social work in her home country, Alice set her sights on the rest of the western world. She traveled across Canada and the U.S., stopping in Vancouver, meeting Mormons in Utah, and talking to Jane Adams in Chicago. Alice found New York inspiring, and she encountered more modern approaches to gender equality. In some households, men even cleared the table after a meal. All the while, she lectured to crowds in North America and Europe about the importance of relief work. She also became known for her activism for world peace during World War I and for women's rights. By the time Alice turned 60 years old, she was internationally recognized and celebrated. The school she had founded was renamed in her honor. And she was also awarded an honorary doctorate in medicine. But she was not able to enjoy these achievements for long. The Nazi Party had come to power in Germany, and Alice was in danger. Despite the fact that she had converted to Christianity in Hitler's Germany, anyone born to a Jewish family was considered Jewish under the law. Alice was subject to the same state sanctioned discrimination and violence as millions of other Jewish people in Germany and nearby parts of Europe. Alice's name was taken off the school, she started. She wasn't even allowed in the building anymore. Nonprofit groups she belonged to dissolved and so did much of her social circle. Alice raised funds and advised people who were attempting to flee Nazi Germany. But her opportunities to continue her life's work in Germany shrank under Nazi rule. Still, Alice continued her international lectures. But this also didn't last. Her progressive politics and international profile made her a target for the Nazis. In 1937, she was interrogated by the Gestapo after returning from a speaking tour in America. They claimed her international travel was suspicious and gave her a choice. Leave Germany within three weeks or be sent to a concentration camp. Alice immigrated to New York in September of 1937. Though she was sad to leave her colleagues and friends behind, she remained hopeful for the future. She wrote so long as I lived in Germany, I was powerless. In sending me away, the Nazis loosened my tongue. Inadvertently, they gave me, after empty, dreary years, a new lease on life. At first, she enjoyed a warm reception in America. In early 1938, Eleanor Roosevelt invited Alice to tea at The White House. And she was honored by various women's and social work groups for her work as a philanthropist and educator. But Alice couldn't find a stable job beyond speaking gigs. It may seem strange that someone as influential as Alice would have trouble finding new work. But she was in her mid 60s and a war refugee. She didn't become a U.S. citizen until 1944. So she was ineligible for public employment for many years. The job market was also tight, and many refugees struggled to win positions over qualified American applicants. Alice committed herself to writing a memoir, recounting her life's work, but she couldn't find a publisher to take it. In August 1948, a severe heat wave stifled New York for 5 full days. As the temperatures hovered around a 100°, Alice died alone in her apartment. The exact date of her death is not known. Though Alice ended her life largely in isolation. Her legacy has grown in the years since. The Nazis destroyed many of her writings. However, the manuscripts of her memoir were rediscovered and finally published in Germany in 1983. Her school for social work in Berlin was also renamed in her honor. In 2001, the Alice salaman archive was created in Berlin. Today, we remember Alice as a mother of modern social work. She was a feminist and educator who remained committed to her service to others during even the darkest of times. All month, we're talking about mothers. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at what manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz caplan for having me as a guest host. As always, we're taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you on Monday.

Alice Germany Berlin University German Academy For Women's Soc International Committee Of Sch Europe Berlin Jane Adams America New York Nazi Party Utah Vancouver North America Hitler Chicago Canada Eleanor Roosevelt White House Alice Salaman
A highlight from AI Today Podcast: AI Glossary Series: Seven Patterns of AI

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:28 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from AI Today Podcast: AI Glossary Series: Seven Patterns of AI

"AI today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen mulch. And I'm your host Ronald Schmidt. And again, thank you for joining us on AI today podcast. We've been going strong now for a long time, 5 years, 300 plus episodes, and really our job is to keep you not only aware and informed about artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data, but really understand what it is and how to apply it to your daily lives, the things that are important. It's good to be talking about these things, but if we're not actually making these things applicable, then what's the point? So in our AI today, we spend a lot of time. We have a lot of series that go under use case as we provide explanations. We have our failure series. We have interviews with people who are sort of in the industry doing stuff with AI, but some of our most popular podcasts have been sort of more fundamental education. Even after these many years, people are still asking fundamental questions about different terms of AI. So we put together a glossary of all the important terms for artificial intelligence machine learning and big data on our site at cognitive. Dot com. You can go there and check that out. But also, we decided, hey, let's take each of those terms. Maybe one term or maybe a couple of terms that are related and go into them into our AI today podcast. Now, of course, knowing the terms knowing what to do with them are different. If you want to actually know how to apply these things, well, that's what we have our training and certification for. So if you are interested in that, you can check out our CPM AI that's cognitive project management for AI training and certification, but we'll get into that later on in this episode. Exactly. So as Ron mentioned, we did put together a very comprehensive AI glass. So we wanted to spend some time on our podcast to at a high level go over some key AI machine learning and big data terms so that our listeners would be able to understand what they are, maybe if there were some confusion about it. We found that there's some definitions out there and different sites, different places that just make it overly complicated, and it doesn't need to be. So we wanted to spend some time on our AI today glossary series, podcast, to just go over these terms and explain them in plain English. So of course, knowing what the term is and how to apply it are different things. So we'll be talking at a high level about what the term is, as well as our glossary, defines it that way. But if you're interested in learning more, we do encourage you to take the

Kathleen Mulch Ronald Schmidt RON Confusion
A highlight from How the Labrador Innu are picking up the pieces of the past to build a new future

Unreserved

02:08 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How the Labrador Innu are picking up the pieces of the past to build a new future

"Organic air? It's village. As indigenous people, we are used to our stories getting a little twisted. So listen up as we set the record straight. Please join me as we hear from dozens of indigenous people together we will decolonize our words and our minds on the telling our twisted history's podcast. You can find an episodes on the CBC listen app or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. Davis inlet, the shantytown on the Labrador coast that the people of Netflix used to call home. This is where the inu were dumped and ignored for 50 years. Canada's third world, a dark secret of despair that the federal government had been told was as bad and inhumane as some of the poorest places on earth. Last night, life took another chilling turn in Davis inlet, an innu village on Labrador's north coast to the community's horror 6 local children were found nearly unconscious in an unheated shack on the town's government wharf. They had been hiding inside and sniffing gasoline, apparently trying to commit suicide. For years, the inu have been asking to be moved again. This time to a place where they can at least have a sewage system and clean water. The federal and provincial governments are considering that request, but it's expensive. And so far, government leaders haven't been able to decide on what they think is best for the people of Davis inland. It's the early 1990s. The headlines and news stories are heartbreaking. Children huddled in a cold shack sniffing to numb themselves. From the poverty, violence, and hopelessness that surrounded their tiny in you community. After ignoring the problem they created for decades, the government finally took action. Eventually moving the inu from Davis inlet further down

Davis Inlet Labrador Coast CBC Netflix North Coast Labrador Federal Government INU Davis Inland Canada Government
A highlight from 346: Understand Your Biases, Take Back Control of Your Body & Mind & Live A More Fulfilled Life | EVETTE DIONNE

RISE Podcast

07:33 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 346: Understand Your Biases, Take Back Control of Your Body & Mind & Live A More Fulfilled Life | EVETTE DIONNE

"So hope is for me everything. I wake up hopeful. I wake up optimistic. I think it really makes a difference for me who has chronic illnesses. It really does make a difference. And whether or not I feel like life is worth it, like the days when I'm really tired and my body is exhausted and I can barely get out of bed, it's still worth it to get up because the world is still moving, like the world is changing better is coming, whether or not I live to see it. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. And I guess we'll just jump in to our chat. So event for listeners who aren't familiar with your work will you tell us a bit about who you are, what you do and why we come to have this conversation today. Yeah, I am a multi hyphenate is how I describe myself. A trained, I'm a trained journalist, so my day job is being the executive editor at this magazine called yes, where I focus on solutions journalism. So thinking about the biggest issues of our day, whether it's racial injustice or indigenous rights, and thinking really forward about what are the solutions to those issues instead of just presenting the problems themselves. And I would say that is something that carries across my life in my career so outside of that an author, a lot of my work focuses on gender and race and size and taking through the lens of pop culture about how we can address those issues and solve them and really think about dismantling those sorts of institutions. So that's a part of my work. And then outside of that, I speak about a lot of those issues and I do it to children. I do it with adults and really trying to get everyone on the board on board with the idea that we can imagine a new world. It doesn't have to look the way that it looks now. The first thing that you said that really sparked curiosity to me is, did you call it solutions journalism? Is that how you set it? I did, yeah. What does that look like? Is that finding experts in the field is that doing your own research? Just fascinated by how that manifests in your life. It's really being connected to and doing community building with people who are on the ground addressing these issues. So whether it's thought leaders or activists or organizers, people who are really ingrained in movements. So I think a lot about one of my favorite people in the world Renee bracey Sherman who is on the ground related to reproductive justice. So when we wanted to do a story about the ways in which activists in Latin America have become a lighthouse for activists in the United States who are focused on reproductive justice, I reached out to Renee like we need someone in Argentina and she said, I know the perfect person. So it's really having and building relationships with people who are not just focused on the problem, but focused on how do we create a better world around this issue, how do we use community to do that and how can the work that I do amplify that message? So it's not just about the bleakness of it, but the hope of it, the optimism of it, like what comes after. Well, and I think when you're getting into an awareness of a new, I hate to say the word problem, but that's what they are. Problems that are facing us in this world in our country, how do you even understand which grassroots organizations are the ones that are truly affecting change? Because I think, you know, when we become aware of something that's going on in the world, like I think of when roe V wade was overturned, and all of the sudden, it was like, I hate to sound like an idiot. I couldn't even believe that that could happen. And you know, and as it was getting closer and closer, it was like, holy shit. No way. No way, and then it happened, and it was like, oh, what do we even do? And so just starting to arm myself with information about which organizations in my local community and the nation that I could support with my platform with my money with my whatever, how have you found that it's best to identify the ones that are truly doing that have the efficacy that we should be supporting because I also think that sometimes it becomes so popular that everyone's doing it, you kind of don't know who you're supposed to look at for guidance. I always say to look toward a person who you trust and ask them about an organization. So no matter what organization it is, if there's someone in your community or even a distant friend who's involved in some sort of movement, ask them, ask them, and I also think social media has been a really great way to figure that out because people will openly criticize organizations that are not on the ground doing the work that they claim to do. So sometimes it's as simple as searching for organizations names say on Twitter or on Facebook or on Instagram and seeing what the criticism is of that organization. And then you can always make a choice of whether or not to support it, but at least you have all of the knowledge about the organization before you decide to throw your support around it or platform it or give money to it. And how did you how did you find your way into this specific type of coverage and journalism? Like, what was it in your past that kind of led you to this place? Oh, that's an awesome question. I am a trained journalist, like a straight up trained journalist, and the way in which we are trained is that we are never the story and that we're supposed to have this objective lens of an issue without any bias or any perspective. And I came to realize that was untrue and graduate school. When I really started understanding that, regardless of whether or not people are open about their biases, everyone has them, and a lot of it is subconscious. So everyone has a worldview, everyone has a perspective. And that really came to the forefront for me when I started supplementing my journalism education with humanity's education. So in history courses and in black feminist theory courses and sociology courses and communication studies, it really helped me develop knowledge outside of just the skill of journalism. And I wanted to figure out how to merge those two things.

Rachel Hollis Renee Bracey Sherman Roe V Wade Youtube Renee Latin America Argentina United States Twitter Facebook
A highlight from S2 Ep29: Cross-Country Mystery: The Disappearance of Tara Calico

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

01:07 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from S2 Ep29: Cross-Country Mystery: The Disappearance of Tara Calico

"At obsessed vests. Can't wait to see you all there. We've all heard stories of women in perfect health going missing, leaving nothing solid behind as a clue. As to where or how they went. Each instance is as tragic as the last. The families are left with nothing but heartache and questions that will likely never be answered. But for one family in particular, as the years ticked on, more questions unfolded, as the mystery of their daughter's disappearance revealed horrible truths about their own town and humanity in general. Welcome to strange and unexplained with me, daisy Egan. I'm a writer and an actor who has never gone missing, but hopes that her loved ones would strike a balance between searching for answers and maintaining their own physical and mental health if I ever did. This week, we'll head to the land of enchantment where one family's quest to find their daughter turned into a decades long mystery with devastating consequences.

Daisy Egan
A highlight from Dr. Andrew Newberg

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:14 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Dr. Andrew Newberg

"Checking out Wednesdays, we've got some shows there. They're up actually all, the previous shows are up to doctor dot com. That has been creating a bit of stir. We're talking to some controversial figures there. Not necessarily I agree with, but I feel like I had to talk to them and see what they have to say. And it's actually expanded my understanding of what happened through COVID so much of what was going on if you remember back in those days and I was like, what are we doing? What's happening? Why are we doing this? I'm starting to understand how it happened, why it happened. And some of the excesses of our complex bureaucracies in this country. Today, the guest is Andrew newberg. He's a neuroscientist who studies the relationship between brain and mental states, particularly. Let's see, where's the term I want to get it out here really? Hold on. Okay, here it is. Attempt to understand the nature of religious and spiritual practices and attitudes. That's where I'm looking for. Neuro theology is the word I was searching for. You can follow me Andrew and Andrew neuburg dot com and he also a Twitter at Andrew newburgh. The book, the varieties of spiritual experience, 21st century research and perspective. Outs in September. And contemporary psychology and neuroscience laboratories around the world learn about the profound inner events and it seems to me the last time a book was named a variety of spiritual experiences. It was probably William James that wrote that book, I'm guessing. This is probably the last time that title appeared on a book, no? I believe that's pretty much correct. Thanks again for having me on the program. But yes, that was the inspiration for this. We're big fans of William James's work. And if you're audience isn't totally familiar with William James, he was an incredible scholar and psychologist back about a hundred years ago. And as part of the different lectures, a very famous lecture series, he ultimately put together a book that was referred to his title was a variety of religious experience and we thought we should broaden it a little bit and give it a little bit of an update, a hundred years, some things have changed in that time frame. So yeah, it's fascinating. So we're talking about it. So weird to me that it's taken a hundred years to get here. And he was such a consummate, he was really a clinician. He sort of invented psychology. And he just was this great observer and with documented things without a lot of, I mean, he had some editorial detail, but he really was just giving it to you as close to the experience as he could give. And he went into the very spiritual experiences. He went there. He went everywhere. He was just not looking at Christianity. He was looking at, I think he looked all the eastern satori kinds of experiences and ultimate experiences and all that stuff, right? Yeah, absolutely. He really did cover a wide variety. I mean, I certainly had more of a Christian perspective to it, which was his area of foundation and his belief system that he came from, but definitely very open to the mystical. He talked a lot about that aspect of experiences. And talked a lot about some of the good and the bad experiences that people have and he would talk about chapters that were titled saintliness, for example. So some very interesting ways of thinking about it. But as you said also, I think one of the really important points about all of this is that it was, you know, it was based on what science could tell us in that time. And so it was very observational from talking to his clients, patients, people that he would meet people he would get to know about those people who had these kinds of experiences. And so while it was an incredible, it was really the first time that anybody kind of put all of this together and talked about religion and spirituality from that psychological and even to a certain extent a little bit of the neurological. He certainly had enough knowledge of brain functions and that there was a relationship going on there. But again, here we are now here we are a 120 some odd years later where we can say, all right, you know, what's on the, what are the brain scans look like of these individuals? What can we do a much more detailed evaluation of the kinds of experiences that people have and what they're like and how they affect people. So to really take what we thought was such a wonderful start, but obviously had its limitations being a hundred years ago to really try to advance this whole perspective on how we can understand this as you use the term neuro theological perspective, what's the relationship between the brain and those religious and spiritual experiences that people have and how can we use this to understand the importance of these experiences for people, how it affects their psyche, their psychology. So there's so much very exciting work that we have now been able to kind of work from and a big future as far as the research goes to. There's a lot for us to learn. All right, we got a lot to get to. And I don't want to belabor the historical too much. But I do want to really contextualize this for people as we move this forward.

William James Andrew Newberg Andrew Neuburg Andrew Newburgh Andrew Twitter
123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

"We'll lies down in the prone piloting position and takes control as best he can with his still developing uniquely designed technology. He source up to 400 feet and lands at a speed of almost 30 mph. We'll repeat the flight over and over. What a gratifying payoff for years of work. And yet, these gliding distances are a far cry off from the sustained controlled flight. These flight obsessed siblings really want. Packing up in the days to come to return to Ohio. They know they'll be back. This is but the first of many trips to kitty hawk for the Wright brothers.

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Ohio Wilbur Kitty Hawk Orville RON North Carolina Gale Bill Tate Devil Hills Kate Wright
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder