Nutrition

Hear the inside skinny with the latest audio on nutrition, how to eat well and maintain a healthy diet and weight, from audio aired on premium podcasts.

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

Audioburst Playlists

00:13 sec | 7 months ago

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

"Welcome to Audioburst’s Nutrition playlist. You’ll hear bite-sized audio highlights from the latest podcasts and talk radio shows on eating well and maintaining a healthy diet. Bon appetit!

A highlight from Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

08:04 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

"To health and our lead question today is about blood pressure and the foods that can help to lower it naturally. What foods are they? We're going to find out in just a moment when we are joined by doctor Neal Barnard, and we're also going to be talking about the foods that you're going to want to avoid when it comes to high blood pressure. What are the ones that you want to take off of your plate to bring that blood pressure down? We're going to find that out. And also, can you lower blood pressure just by taking table salt off of the table? We're going to get that answer as well. And then on a different note, we're also going to be talking about what we know so far about vegan diets and the acron variant. You know, it's still very much too early to know for certain, much of anything, but doctor Barnard will share where we think diet and acron will shake out in the end. And we also have questions today about flax and chia seeds and omega threes and nuts and whether they can thicken the blood. That's an interesting question. But before we bounce around, I wanted to share a couple of points with you about hypertension. You know, it affects nearly half of all adults in the United States, and perhaps, because it is so common that it often goes overlooked, it's just accepted as the norm, and yet high blood pressure was at the very least a contributing factor in more than a half a million deaths in 2019. And the price tag that is associated with high blood pressure, I mean, this is something that can give anybody sticker shock. We're talking about 131 billion dollars every year, according to the CDC. 131 billion. Just to treat high blood pressure. So we're going to talk about ways that we can flip that script in just a moment. But before we do, I wanted to say a special thank you to the Gregory J rider memorial fund for helping us to raise our health IQ today. Their support of the exam room podcast is making this episode possible. The Gregory J rider memorial fund supports organizations like the physicians committee that carry on the love that Greg had for animals by promoting plant based health and working to end animal abuse. And you can visit the Gregory J rider memorial fund online right now at Gregory writer fund dot org. That's Gregory. REI, TER fund dot org sign up for their newsletter and learn about everything that they're working on. Okay, time now to see if we can offer up some help with hypertension, bring down those sky high rates and astronomical costs by addressing the root cause of the issue. And for that, we welcome doctor Neal Barnard. My friend so good to see you again. Good to see you, chuck. A high blood pressure when I was looking at up for today's show. I was stunned to hear that nearly half of all adults in the U.S. have it. What is the current criteria, the clinical criteria for high blood pressure? Yeah, but by the way, back to where you were starting about why this is such a terrible thing. So it's why it's so expensive. It's not really that people have to go and buy blood pressure pills. That's a big part of it. They are pricey and often you're on two pills or three. But the thing about it is it affects your heart. And it affects your kidneys. It affects other parts of your health. So all the health costs that you need to treat all those things. Those are all adding up into that astronomical figure. It's not just the blood pressure itself. But the criteria that we want to aim for is a 120 over 80. That's a good one, and it's been around for a long time and there have been mild adjustments here and there to it, but that's still a good number. And what that number means is that the doctor nurse medical technician or yourself, you put the cuff around your arm. And the blood pressure will go up to one 20 and down to 80 with each heartbeat. When your heart is contracting, it goes up to one 20 when it's relaxing, goes down to 80. That's systolic, diastolic. Systolic diastolic. One 20 down to 80. If you are higher than that with either one of those measurements, we're going to say that's higher. And higher than it should be. And we want to bring it down. A lot of people will say, well, gee, you know, I changed my diet. I'm way below that. I'm now a hundred over 65 or something like that is that dangerous. The answer is if you're a healthy person, no lower blood pressure is a good thing to be a good place to be. All right. Well, let's go ahead and see if we can't bring that blood pressure down our first question comes to us from tessie, who was wondering what are the best foods to lower high blood pressure? Ah, great question. So what can we do about it? There are really a couple of different strategies that we're aiming for when we're picking foods. The first one you already know about. We want to get away from high sodium foods. And get toward high potassium foods. Sodium brings blood pressure up, potassium brings it down. We also want to get away from high fat foods and go toward low fat foods, fat brings blood pressure up to because it makes the blood thicker, more viscous, harder to move, and that raises blood pressure. And the final thing, the third thing, is foods that help you lose weight. So low fat, vegan, high fiber foods, those are hot. So what specifically are we thinking about? All right, I want to have a food that doesn't have a lot of fat. Doesn't have a lot of sodium has a lot of potassium. Vegetables, fruits. Whole range, they're going to be your very best Friends. Along with them are the bean group and the whole grain group. What are the worst? Okay, the three worst foods are cheese, cheese, and cheese. Three I was saying that is that it's really high in saturated fat. It's got sodium too. Hold on to your blood pressure. If I have potato chips, two ounces of potato chips, 330 milligrams of sodium in that back. If I have some Cheddar, it's got more sodium. Yes, it has more sodium than potato chips. Three 50 if it's Velveeta, it's 800 milligrams of sodium. In two ounces. So get away from the cheese. Get away from the meats in general. So vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, get away from the animal products. Oh, by the way, one other thing. Coconut oil, palm oil, have been marketed a lot, throw them out, shine your shoes with them, don't eat them. You know, you mentioned potato chips. Just a minute ago. I'm glad that you did because we have a question from Sabrina. Potato chips absolutely a vegan food, and if you spend any time in the grocery store recently, you've noticed that there are more and more vegan options on store shelves. But Sabrina is wondering, can those processed vegan foods like the ones you find in the frozen food aisle? Also raise blood pressure. They can if you did one of the things that we were talking about, added a whole bunch of sodium. Or added a lot of bad fats. Those are the two ways to ruin it. Now, processing itself gets a bad name, but it's not such a terrible thing. If you take a grain of wheat, grind it up into flour and you make spaghetti out of it. That's fine. As long as you're not putting something bad on top of your spaghetti, that's a perfectly fine food, even though it's processed. Where we run into trouble is when people start adding a lot of sodium and a lot of fatty foods, especially the coconut palm oil, that's when you're really running into trouble. Let's take a question from Andre. This is a really good one and I think it's something that a lot of people do immediately when they're told that they have a high blood pressure. It's the first thing that they do. Andre is wondering, is cutting out

Neal Barnard Gregory J Rider Memorial Fund Gregory J Rider Memorial Fund Physicians Committee Gregory J Rider Memorial Hypertension Barnard United States CDC Gregory Greg Chuck Tessie Sabrina Andre
A highlight from SIBO: Do You Have It? Do You Want It?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:14 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from SIBO: Do You Have It? Do You Want It?

"Trying to stay healthy can seem like a full-time job sometimes, especially during a pandemic. But I'm here to make that goal a little easier. Welcome to the nutrition facts podcast. I'm your host, doctor Michael greger. Today, an acronym that needs a little explaining. It's called sibo, SIBO, and it stands for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Here's my first story. Gastrointestinal symptoms like abdominal pain and bloating account for millions of doctor visits every year. One of the conditions that may be considered for such a nonspecific presentation of symptoms is sibo. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth a concept that has gained popularity on the Internet. In addition to certain clinical research circles, sibo is broadly defined as the excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestine, is typically treated with antibiotics. But dispensing antibiotics to patients with such nonspecific common symptoms is not without risks you could be fostering antibiotic resistance. There could be side effects, and wiping out your good bacteria could set you up for an invasion of bad bugs like C diff, all for

Michael Greger Sibo Antibiotic Resistance
A highlight from 1697: HIIT Training Doesnt Work (Unless You Follow These Steps)

Mind Pump

04:18 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 1697: HIIT Training Doesnt Work (Unless You Follow These Steps)

"Boys, we are entering into hit training season. I think this is when everybody starts or it's close soon. Everybody starts to hit it. That's actually an interesting point. Do you think that we are heading into the most popular time for it or do you think it is heading into like springtime? No, I think so because yeah, after the holidays, it's like everybody gets in this hustle of like, oh no, I need to do something about this and what's the quickest way I can lose weight? Yeah, I remember specifically, so I started training professionally, I guess, as I was a kid, right? So 1997 or 98, I started working in gyms and hit didn't exist, right? The acronym high intensity interval training wasn't a thing. Cardio was doing the StairMaster or the treadmill or the bike. In fact, ellipticals I don't even think existed at that time. And that was that. And then I remember, I don't remember when this happened. I want to one O two. Early 2002 1001. The reason why I remember so vividly is because I was a new trainer. I was pretty brand. And I was like, maybe a year or two in the business and maybe like we could probably go back and fact check me on things when it really started to I mean, maybe it started before, but it became popular. Yeah. 'cause I was in the gyms. I was working in gyms in 2000 and it wasn't but a year or two later did it become like and being completely transparent. I train like every fucking client hit for like a year. Everybody didn't matter your goal did everyone build muscle, lose body fat. All of the current studies that were being touted at that time were related to hit and all its benefits. Well, I remember specifically there was one study that is the reason why every trainer did this, especially new trainers. The experience trainers didn't. I do remember that. It was all of us new trainers, but there was a study that came out that showed that something like 15 minutes or 20 minutes of hit training was as effective as I don't remember. I mean to throw out a number of some like an hour worth of traditional steady state cardio. So all of a sudden everybody was like, oh my gosh, I could get the same potential calorie burning effect or fat loss effect or whatever with a less than half of the time. And so it just became this huge thing and it was probably early 2000s. I didn't remember that. And I remember all of a sudden, nobody did traditional cardio. Everybody was doing hit training. I do remember the two that study, the one I read at least was very controlled. It had a guy on a bike. And it wasn't an assault bike. It was something very similar to that where they were doing just constant sprints and then they would rest for a brief minute. They would do sprints again. So it was like, it was different than what all of a sudden hit became. But that was definitely the study that then a lot of trainers used to justify these so that's interesting that we all remember different studies. So I remember the muscle sparing one. Yes. I remember the research that was done around how muscle sparing it was like, and what you could do this cardio burn the most amount of time, but then because here's the thing, I remember being the skinny kid trying to build muscle. I didn't want to lose muscle. So cardio was like just not happening. And so when this study came out and said, wow, I could do this cardio and actually not lose muscle that it was the most muscle sparing way for you to do cardio. That's what triggered it for me or at least what I remember. Now Doug just pulled up a article that said this was popular in the 70s. I call bullshit. Well, they didn't call it hit training, I don't think. I think they might have called you know what? I mean, we should credit the coach who did it, right? So it's coach Peter co is supposedly the first person to really make it popular, but it wasn't popular then. It wasn't when we know there's no work when I was in high school and we were lifting weights like I never even heard the term hit until the 2000. You know, the closest thing I remember that was old and I only remember this because the name was so funny as a kid. I thought it was hilarious. Fart lek. You know what? Fort licking is? It's like that. You run, and then you walk. Wait, wait, go back, go back down. It says Arthur Jones. Should you bring that back? Go up right there right there. Oh, see, Arthur Jones, no. His was high intensity training, not high intensity interval training. So Arthur drones is the one that pioneered. One set to failure. The famous Casey valet or study the Denver project. He was a known for hit. No, he was not known for him.

Peter Co Fort Licking Doug Arthur Jones Casey Valet Arthur Denver
A highlight from Body image & self esteem with Dr. Katelyn

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

04:19 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Body image & self esteem with Dr. Katelyn

"Doctor Caitlin has lived in a bigger body, her entire life and has made it her mission to fight for the injustices that fat people face in the skinny world. In addition, doctor Caitlin helps women learn to love their bodies and heal their relationship with food and health. A quick trigger warning before we dive into today's episode, we do discuss some eating disorder behaviors, so if this feels uncomfortable to you, feel free to skip to the next episode. And as a reminder, this podcast is for informational and educational purposes only. And it is not a substitute for individual medical care or advice. All right, let's get into today's episode. We start with doctor Caitlin telling us what her relationship with food and her body was like before she found intuitive eating and health at every size. It was a mess. For lack of better terms, I struggle with anorexia, which a lot of people don't think that people in larger moms can struggle with. But I would maybe eat one time a day wasn't particularly in nutritious meal at that either. It was just something literally to be like, okay, I'm so busy. I'm doing all these things. I have to eat something, might as well make it something that's taste good. So I really struggle with that for a very long time. From childhood, honestly. And there's reasons for that and die down diets and all of that kind of stuff forever. And then it just really manifested in grad school and internship year when my life was just so hectic in food was not a priority. I was not a priority. Mentally or physically, I wasn't going to the doctor. It wasn't in therapy. I was just a mess. Quite frankly. Yeah. Wow, well, thank you for sharing that. And I think that a lot of people have probably struggled with really restricting their food before and not thought it was a problem due to their body size. So I appreciate you bringing light to that. You can struggle with an eating disorder, no matter what your body size is. And so it sounds like this started when you were really young. So did you have anorexia before you started dieting? No. Okay. I think I was just like a kind of a regular kid, but I always just been bigger. Like my family is just bigger. I was just bigger. I was very, very active as a child. I played all kinds of sports and was always outside with my friends, but I was just bigger. And then I was put on diets at a very young age, you know, sent to fat camps and things like that. But sure, great fond memories of those times. So yeah, no, I think started honestly and remember in 5th grade, there was a time when I was talking to a friend and talking about wanting to lose weight and this friend encouraged me to go in the bathroom at lunchtime and throw up after eating. So that was in 5th grade and then in high school, I was so self conscious about eating that I wouldn't eat at lunch. I wouldn't eat breakfast because I had to wake up at 5 a.m. and then I would go and tell, I got home or after extracurriculars and then I would eat like dinner. That was wow. Yeah, and you know at 9 years old, would you probably know this, but this is when we start to see the onset of clinical eating disorders. So it's interesting that when you are in 5th grade, it sounds like that's when you started to engage in some of these behaviors, but before 5th grade were you already aware of your body size or what was that like? Yeah, I was. I remember our emphasis TMI, but I had the but it wasn't really like boobs and fat deposits. And I remember being so embarrassed because my mom made me go wrong shopping and I was like, the only girl around age 8,

Caitlin Anorexia
A highlight from Working In the Office Is a Scam with Dr. Devon Price

Food Heaven Podcast

07:37 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Working In the Office Is a Scam with Dr. Devon Price

"Welcome back to another episode. We have one of our favorite things. Okay, I'll stop talking go ahead. Just as excited. Love them. I mean, I'm thrilled over the moon. Doctor Devin price is a social psychologist, professor and the author of laziness is not exist. I was the bio that they submitted to us. But we have so much to say about them. They've been on the podcast before. Talking about this whole concept of laziness and productivity. And Devin has one of my favorite Instagram accounts. It's like just so insightful, always giving me something to think about thinking about things differently, especially as it relates to work, productivity, creativity, and they covered so much today. Yeah, so the reason why we brought them back on the podcast was to talk about their latest article on medium, which is about productivity. And basically how we've all been working from home. We've been more productive, however, managers are forcing people to go back into the office and it's literally a scam. And what the research has to say about all that, my favorite thing was how many hours they recommended that people work per day. It's going to shock you and I'm going to try to switch up my whole life. And really just getting into all the nitty Gritty on why we should be allowed to work from home, how to advocate for yourself, what that would look like. So it was an amazing episode. I was nodding the whole time. You guys are gonna love it. Make sure to listen to the very end because Devin actually has a second book coming out and you want to learn about that. Before we jump into the episode, I am going to read a listener review from Sims 7 two 6 and they write impactful. It's like you pick the titles out of my brain. Sometime I hope you'll end up doing a certain random topic and then Wednesday morning I'll see the thought I had as the headline. It's amazing. So helpful and relatable. So much new and applicable information that I truly find myself applying to everyday life. This podcast is a gift that keeps giving. This is one of my favorite reviews. I was just thinking, I'm like, wow, this was very thoughtful. I actually was checking the reviews the other day. I'd usually check like once a month, and I was like, that's a really nice one. Thank you so much. Appreciate you. Also, wanted to let you know that on Monday, December 6th, we are going to be doing an IG live event. We haven't done these in a minute. So it's super exciting market calendar is going to be a 7 p.m. eastern. And we are going to be teaming up with MS advocate Azor antonette. We're going to be talking about the important role of food and nutrition for people who have chronic conditions and chronic pain. For people who have multiple sclerosis, it could be really hard to do a lot of these changes that are promoted as healthy. And so we're going to be talking about potential considerations that people should take into account, living with a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis. And I am actually going to be doing a food demo. We're going to be cooking, so come through, Jess and I will be there. Azoo is going to share her insight about how she approaches nutrition as someone who's been living with MS for over ten years. And this event is part of Janssen's more to MS campaign, which supports people living with MS with educational resources to help them live well, to learn more, you can visit more to MS dot com. Make sure that you join us. It's going to be on our page. So you can go to food heaven on Instagram, December 6th, at 7 p.m. eastern 4 p.m. Pacific. All right, y'all. Let's get into this episode. All right, welcome back to the podcast Devin. Yeah, hi. Thanks for having me back. So do you feel like you are an Internet superstar? Because you are. I'm just wondering how you internalize everything. Oh, God. I don't know. Definitely when I get really weird DMs, that's what I'm like, something is going on here. And is it me? Am I giving people the wrong expectation? Yeah, that was my second question was what are your DMs? Right. It's all over the place. Like a lot of times it is really, really nice stuff that is like also still so heavy or like overly familiar that you don't know what to do with it. I would imagine you both have the same thing too. Like if you're talking about any vulnerable topics, people get a really strong emotional connection to your work, and it means so much to them. And of course, I know how it feels to be on the other side of that and to have work really connect with me. But it's really hard to know, what do I owe to people? I can't emotionally show up for all of them. It's just a weird, it's a weird feeling. It's kind of overwhelming. Yeah. And it's like you're posting so many thought provoking whether it's articles or Twitter threads or Instagram stories. It seems like a part time job, if not a full-time job to be able to think things through enough to post and have an opinion that is like, I'm always like, oh, yes, this is like hitting the nail on the head. I think I just get over caffeinated and then I just go off. Okay. And then whatever happens happens, I don't know. It's totally this weird bloodletting for me. Yeah. It feels like there's always some kind of stimulant or like another guest who has very great thought provoking pieces said that they just do an edible. Something kind of helping to channel all of the ideas. Okay, well, so you were on our podcast a few months ago talking about your book, laziness doesn't exist, which hopefully everyone has got that book already because it's incredible. And you recently wrote this article that was shared with me, actually. I'm like, wait, oh, this is Devin about productivity and kind of this whole work from home. Slash transition into the office, culture that's been happening. And so the article is titled productivity will go down this year, but you probably won't hear business leaders talking about it. On the articles on media we'll link to it so you guys can check it out. Can you talk about what inspired you to write about this article? And for people who haven't read it, just like a cliffs notes version of what your point is. Yeah, so one thing that I have noticed time and time again in the management literature and the organizational psychology kind of literature is there's this huge gap between what the data says is best for people as workers and what managers and bosses want to do and what they believe about human nature. So this has been a problem for years. We know from the data that when people have flexible schedules, when they have some degree of autonomy over what work tasks, they take on and how they divide up their day. They thrive when they have enough time off. They do higher quality work. And they are just a more quote unquote worthwhile investment for their organization. They're likely to just stay there for a long time and do really good work. And despite all of that, repeatedly, you'll see managers acting like those things are luxuries that it's like a kindness that you aren't entitled to to give that kind of humane treatment to their employees or even that if you give people that flexibility they're going

Devin Devin Price Azor Antonette Azoo IG Sims Janssen Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis Jess Instagram Twitter
A highlight from 1696: Partial Reps Vs. Full Reps for Building Muscle, the Pros & Cons of Workout Partners, the Best Tools for Recovery & More

Mind Pump

01:56 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 1696: Partial Reps Vs. Full Reps for Building Muscle, the Pros & Cons of Workout Partners, the Best Tools for Recovery & More

"How you pronounce Q&A. This is where we answered some questions, so at the end of this episode, the back half, I should say we did four fitness and health questions that were asked by listeners. Just like you. But the way we open the episode is with a 53 minute intro where we talked about current events, scientific studies talked about our lives, and we talked about some of our sponsors. So here's what went down in today's episode. We opened up by talking about more, not always being better. This is one of the most difficult things to learn about working out. More is not always better. Then we talked about Civil War among chimps. Yeah, when some scientists actually observed a 40 year Civil War with chimpanzees, that's kind of crazy. Confederate chimps. Then Adam talked about the Christmas tree that he brought home that was massive. It was 15 feet tall, so totally interesting story. How he got it in the house and got it up. I talked about the Friends giving weekend that I had with some of my friends and family. Got some cousins who have new babies as well. Got all the kids together was a good time. Then we talked about how bacon and pork prices have exploded. Baking alone, 28% more expensive over the last 12 months. However, if you're signed up to butcher box that delivers meat directly to your door, eliminates middlemen. Not only are you not paying that higher prices, but right now, if you sign up, you can get a pack of bacon in every box for life, as long as you sign up for life. Son. That's crazy. Everyone's charging more. They're giving away good bacon. If you're interested, check them out, head over to butcher box dot com slash mind pump, and that's where you'll get that discount. Then I talked about a restaurant that I went to with my wife. It was a lot of fun. Justin and I talked about this Instagram page that he introduced me to. Called vintage cheese, but it's not about cheese. Yeah, rolled me under the bus. Then we talked about Tiger king part two, a disappointment. Then we brought up Felix gray, excuse me,

Adam Justin Felix Gray
A highlight from Will Fermented Vegetables Increase Your Cancer Risk?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:16 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Will Fermented Vegetables Increase Your Cancer Risk?

"Hello there and welcome to the nutrition diva podcast. I'm your host Monica Ryan eagle, and this week we're talking about fermented vegetables and a possible link to stomach cancer. Nutrition even listener Brian wants to know do the benefits of fermented vegetables such as sauerkraut and kimchi outweigh the risk of getting stomach cancer. I understand that Koreans who eat a lot of kimchi also have the highest rates of stomach cancer. So I'm wondering whether increasing our consumption of these products in order to help the beneficial bacteria in our guts is worth the risk. Brian is right, people in Asian countries where fermented vegetables make up a large part of the diet do have higher rates of stomach cancer than elsewhere in the world. 50 years ago, stomach cancer was one of the most common types of cancer diagnosed worldwide. And the good news is that the global incidence of stomach cancer has declined significantly over the last decades. This is due in part to precipitous declines in smoking, which is a significant risk factor for stomach cancer. It's also due to better detection and treatment of H pylori. That's a type of bacteria that commonly infects the digestive tract and can cause stomach ulcers, as well as stomach cancer. H pylori is readily eradicated by antibiotic therapy, and now that we know to look for it and exactly how to get rid of it, ulcers and stomach cancer are far less common. However, the incidence of stomach cancer remains high in Korea and elsewhere in Asia and believe it or not, the very high consumption of fermented vegetables is thought to be one contributing factor. Now, this is a little confusing, right? Because eating more vegetables is a good way to reduce your risk of cancer. And, as Brian points out, fermented vegetables also contain probiotic bacteria, which foster a healthy gut. At the same time, fermented vegetables do contain nitrosamines. These compounds which are byproducts of the fermentation process can have carcinogenic effects. Here in the west, the primary source of dietary nitrosamines are cured and processed meats, like bacon and salami. In Korea, where the total nitrosamine intake is much higher, the primary dietary sources are smoked or salted fish and fermented vegetables, like kimchi. The traditional Korean diet is also much higher in sodium than the typical western diet, which is not exactly low in sodium, right? And this may be another contributing factor to the high rates of stomach cancer. Sodium in high amounts may irritate the lining of the stomach, and that could make it more vulnerable to the carcinogenic effects of nitrosamines. Another thing to keep in mind is that the traditional Korean diet, while very high in fermented and pickled vegetables, is often quite low in fresh vegetables. The nutrients and fresh vegetables especially the vitamin C can neutralize the nitrosamines in the digestive tract. And the epidemiological evidence bears this out. People whose diets are high in pickled vegetables, but also high in fresh vegetables, appear to be protected against the increase in cancer risk. This same protective effect also applies to the nitrosamines found in processed meats, such as bacon or hot dogs. Western diets that contain a lot of processed meats have it repeatedly been linked to increased risk of cancers of the digestive tract. However, this increased risk is not seen in those who eat a lot of processed meat but also eat a lot of vegetables. Although it's clear that vegetable consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk. We still don't know all of the mechanisms involved. It could be the antioxidants that vegetables provide the fiber might also play a role both by improving digestion and elimination, and also by fostering a healthy gut microbiome. And perhaps this carcinogen neutralizing effect is also part of what makes vegetables so very good for us. So to answer Brian's question, I think you can safely and beneficially incorporate fermented vegetables into your diet. Both as a way to get more vegetables and also to get some probiotic bacteria. Just make sure that your diet also contains plenty of fresh vegetables and not too much salted smoked or cured meat and fish. It's fine to enjoy those foods on occasion, just not as a daily staple. You'll find a complete transcript of today's show along with links to the research and some related episodes on our website at quick and dirty tips dot com. And you can also search the entire archives of almost 650 episodes for your answers to other nutrition questions. If you've got a question I

Stomach Cancer Monica Ryan Brian Cancers Korea Asia
A highlight from Preventing & Reversing Diabetes: Best Foods for a Healthy You | Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, and Robby Barbaro, MPH

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:13 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Preventing & Reversing Diabetes: Best Foods for a Healthy You | Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, and Robby Barbaro, MPH

"Physicians committee. Hi, I am the weight loss champion chuck Carroll. Thank you so very much for raising your health IQ with us in more than 130 countries around the world. So hello to all of the exam roomies listening in Japan. In Guatemala, Jamaica, and Sri Lanka. We appreciate you all, helping to make the world a healthier place. This is episode 96 of season four. Number 291 overall. And today, in honor of national diabetes month, we are going to be doing a special doctor's mailbag with doctor Cyrus kambata and Robbie barbaro from mastering diabetes. Both of these gentlemen are actually living with the type one form of the disease. But they have taken control of their health by putting the focus on food. And they are rethinking the traditional approach to treating diabetes and instead focusing on a whole food plant based approach, which there is increasing amounts of data showing that it can be one of the most beneficial and effective courses of action that anyone living with diabetes can partake

Physicians Committee Chuck Carroll Cyrus Kambata Robbie Barbaro Diabetes Guatemala Jamaica Sri Lanka Japan
A highlight from #415: Prof. Bruce Neal  Can Salt Substitutes Reduce Cardiac Events & Death?

Sigma Nutrition Radio

02:31 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from #415: Prof. Bruce Neal Can Salt Substitutes Reduce Cardiac Events & Death?

"Words to say about last week's episode where we went in depth and down the rabbit hole of looking at machine learning and data science and how that may apply to nutrition research going forward. So a big deep episode and thank you for everyone who made their way through all of that. And hopefully you enjoyed that discussion and we welcome further comments and questions. So that was episode 414 of the podcast. Today, we are going to be talking with professor Bruce Neal, who is the executive director at the George institute for global health, Australia, as well as being Professor of medicine at UNSW, Sydney. Professor Neil has been involved in a variety of different clinical interventions over the years with a particular interest in things like blood pressure and diabetes, but his work spends well beyond that for several decades now. And he has particular expertise in conducting large scale clinical trials that look at things related to cardiovascular disease in particular. Now, recently, he has shifted that towards a kind of a nutritional stunt and looking at how can we actually roll out maybe large scale clinical trial styles that we typically see in biomedical research and apply that to nutrition questions. And so this year he was the lead author on a huge study that came out in the New England Journal of Medicine, titled the effect of salt substitution on cardiovascular events and death or the sas trial. And this query made quite a splash when it was published for a number of reasons which will probably become clear as we start discussing it. And so I'm really really delighted to talk to professor Neil about this particular study and hopefully we'll get into some of the details of that. And then the implications of them. Of course, if you're a regular listener, you will know we did an episode on salt sodium and health back in episode 375 of the podcast where Allen and I went into a bit of detail on the nutritional epidemiology in this area as well as any of the interventions and tried to kind of consolidate that into some conclusions. So if you haven't listened to episode three 75 yet, you find this topic of sodium and human health. Interesting, then maybe make a note of that as one to go back and revisit. We hope you enjoy it. So without further ado, let me welcome to the show professor Bruce Neal. Welcome to the

Bruce Neal George Institute For Global He Professor Neil Unsw Cardiovascular Disease Sydney New England Journal Of Medicin Diabetes Australia Neil Allen
A highlight from 1695: How to Lose 100 Pounds

Mind Pump

05:15 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 1695: How to Lose 100 Pounds

"Massive 60% off all of those things. I have one for us to discuss today. Cassie's message me a few times about this and I think we've got a loosely talked about this topic, but I don't think we've actually sat down in like, I don't know, organized our thoughts on a methodical approach on how we may help somebody in this case. And that is how to lose a hundred pounds. Oh yeah. And I know obviously all of us have trained lots of clients in our time of being trainers that have needed to lose a hundred pounds. And I would say that this rule, even though the title will be like a hundred pounds, it really applies to probably anything 50 and above. I mean, I really, once you start getting 50, 60, 70, hundred, hundred pounds plus over, it's a little bit more of a special case than somebody who's just trying to shred down ten pounds that they put on from the holidays or something. Yeah, I know we've talked a lot about ways people, you know, like negative ways that people have approached this in terms of the wrong methods applied, but we haven't really been able to take time to, how would we put all this together? So I think that is important. Yeah, stress. Probably one of the most challenging categories of clients that I would say I'd ever worked with because yes, it's a lot of weight to lose. And yes, the way you lose weight in terms of, I guess the steps or the mechanics of it are the same if you only lose 20 pounds or if you want to lose a hundred pounds. But that completely ignores the real psychological and behavioral challenges that we're dealing with when you have to lose this much weight. And this is just the reality. at one point I had quite a few clients at and I know you guys did too. I think the gym that we all worked at at one point was right next to bariatric clinics. You're dealing with at one point, I think, you know, if you're 30 pounds over weight, 40 pounds, and it starts to climb. You enter into a different mental state and you start to kind of like, okay, I don't care. And this is just how I live and it's very, very challenging once the person makes a decision and says, okay, this is enough. I want to reverse out of this. It's a hard position to be in because it requires some big lifestyle changes, which are not easy. I want to be very clear, changing your nutrition is hard for anybody because how we eat is very closely connected to our personalities and who we are and our emotions and how we celebrate food is much more than just nutrition and calories. It's connected to so many different things. And activity also, how we move throughout the day, how we structure our day. These are all intricate components of how we live and changing them radically and then trying to make it stick. Very, very, very, very challenging. I'm very passionate to about this specific conversation and a lot of that has to do with, I think the most popular conversation around this is had by the biggest loser show. And it's a terrible example. Yeah, and I think they do a really terrible job. Although people that watch it or inspired and it makes for good TV, I remember very clearly when that show first aired. I was a trainer. And the wave of people that I got in. And so there's the positive side. It motivated some people to get off the couch, head into a gym, potentially get a gym membership and hire a trainer, but the only problem is I now had this hurdle of this expectation of the next three months. Can we drop this hundred pounds? Because they did it on biggest loser, and they were so inspired that I want to do that. I saw them do it. I'm tired of being this way and you know, I'm here to invest in you and let's do this. And I struggled with that. I struggled with that for the first couple of years on how to communicate this the right way and over time I've learned how to do that, but at the beginning, it was a challenge because there was so much energy around that show that people wanted to train that way. We got to be very clear, okay, losing the hundred pounds. Okay, I know it's going to sound kind of crazy. That's the easy part. Not saying it's easy, but of the whole formula, that's the easy part. The hard part is keeping it off forever. Way more people a much greater percentage of people lose a hundred pounds than are actually able to keep it off. The fail rate on all weight loss is something close to 90%, 80 to 90%. It's got to be higher for this kind of weight loss because of its challenge. And all of the things that we're going to talk about today in terms of all the challenges that you encounter. The biggest loser in my opinion was terrible because not only did they do it the wrong way, but they made people think that the happy ending at the end is I lost a hundred pounds. We don't know what happened 5 or ten years later. And that's the challenge. So how do we fix that? Is it do we lose the weight and then figure out how to keep it off after? That's what a lot of people do, right? They think, listen, I'll lose the weight first. And then I'll figure out how to keep it off.

Cassie
A highlight from 401  The Synergy of Omega-3, Vit. D3 and Vit. K2

Health Quest Podcast

04:48 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 401 The Synergy of Omega-3, Vit. D3 and Vit. K2

"I'm your host Steve Langford, thanks for joining me. I'm glad you're here. We're going to have an interesting discussion today. We're going to take a new look at the rolls of omega three vitamin D three and vitamin K two. You may have heard of all three of those, but I don't imagine that you've probably heard about them in the context of how they might work together. What's the synergy between these particular nutrients? That's what we're going to discuss today with one of my favorite guests. Jolie root. You've heard Jolie many times. She's our most prolific contributor to our interviews here at health quest podcast. And I as you know, I love speaking to Jolie. I learn a lot from her every time I do one of these interviews. And that's how I know it's going to be interesting and educational for you our listeners. She's a senior nutritionist. She's the educator at Carlson laboratories. She's been doing this as long as I've known her. But she's been in the natural products industry for a long time. She's been a natural product. Retailer, so she understands that part of the equation she's worked with consumers. She's got a career in education in the health sciences. She's a nutritionist and a nurse. I always like that combination because it brings in the convergence of the medical and the nutritional. Each are important. Each play their role, but they're not the same. And so we want to understand what are the benefits of these nutrients. So she's able to really bring the science and the nutritional practical application of this good nutrition for health. I believe she still does her weekly radio show called food for thought. This is heard in New York City in Connecticut. If you happen to be in those areas, you can listen. It was on Fridays at ten a.m., but you can also listen online. So you can hear Jolie her weekly radio show any time that you want. And so I highly endorse her as an educator, you know, I love her as one of my guests. So today we're going to talk about this interesting synergy between omega three, vitamin D and vitamin K two. What are their roles? How are they connected? And how is taking them together, beneficial for you? So it's in that capacity I'm pleased to introduce Jolie root. Jolie welcome back to health quest podcast. Thanks, Steve, what a generous and kind introduction. You give me. Thank you so much. It's easy to do because it's from the heart and mind. I really do enjoy our conversations. The opportunities that we've had to speak, the opportunities we've had to meet, which have been so sparse in the last couple of years. I'm glad we have this opportunity to continue to get together and explore these important concepts. For our listeners, you can go back and listen more, learn more about Jolie's history, learn more about Carlson as a company. They of course are the sponsors of our interviews with Jolie. They're one of the leaders in the nutritional field. They've been doing it. Gosh going back at least into the 70s, maybe longer. I take Carlson products. My wife takes Carlson products and if you've listened to us in the past, I credit their fish oil with being one of the most important nutrients my wife and I have ever taken and it's been my favorite recommendation foundational nutrient for virtually everybody I talked to. If they're not getting omega threes, they've got to get them, no matter what their state of health, good, bad or otherwise, everybody needs these foundational nutrients. While in the last few years, we've started hearing about the importance of vitamin D well people in the nutritional products industry have known this for decades. We're also hearing more about vitamin K two. This is perhaps a more recent awareness, but certainly it's one of those vitamins that has risen into the awareness of many consumers and why it's important. Perhaps especially for women, but really for everybody. So that's the context that we're going to be looking at today with Jolie. So thank you, Jolie for bringing these interesting topics to us. If people want more information of our past interviews, they're all linked on the podcast page. They can go back and pick through the many different topics that we've covered here on health quest. So we're not going to delve into that today. People have that information. Let's start off with really the foundation. You mentioned to me that you wanted to discuss this synergy between omega three vitamin D three and vitamin K two.

Jolie Steve Langford Carlson Laboratories Jolie Root Carlson Retailer Connecticut New York City Steve
A highlight from Reinvent Yourself with Sheri Salata

Ask The Health Expert

03:55 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Reinvent Yourself with Sheri Salata

"Hey, it's JJ and welcome to ask the health expert, but this isn't just any old ass to health expert session. This is your bonus session. Yes, it's the weekend and because it's the weekend, we are gonna take some time with an amazing expert. So be on the lookout for these Saturday asked the health expert bonus sessions where we're gonna go deep into an amazing subject with an incredible expert to give you actionable items that you can put into your life. Hey, it's JJ here and today's show is fascinating and fun because we are going to be talking about we're going to actually blow up this whole concept of midlife. I don't know about you, but that just kind of makes my skin crawl. I was like, how did I get here? Wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute. I still feel like I'm, you know, 30. And we're gonna reframe that as middle of life. And today we're talking about kind of reinventing yourself and really figuring out where you want to be not what you want to do and we're doing that with my girlfriend, sherry salata, and met her a couple of years ago, she was actually the speaker, the keynote speaker at a charity event that I had in my house. And I hadn't met her before, and she's speaking, and I'm falling just in love with this woman thinking this is going to be my new pal. She doesn't know it yet, but she's gotta be and now she is. And I just love the book that she's written. It's called the beautiful now. We're going to be talking about this. You may know her from the sherry and Nancy show. This is 50 pillar life. And also you may know her from Oprah. Yes, I said, Oprah. She was she worked at Oprah for 20 years in executive producer for the last 5 of it and produced the famous season 25 and was co president both Harper studios and own so she has some amazing stories to tell, but really the biggest stories are the stories of her kind of waking up to her own life and where she wanted to be. And as you read this book, the beautiful now, I call it the highlighter book because you're just kind of relate you're gonna go oh my gosh, she's in my head with me. And there's so many great stories and so much inspiration. And what I really love is that she's put a workbook together to go with it, which makes so much sense because as I'm reading it, I'm literally highlighting things, writing down notes of things that I want to do. It is the book that will inspire you motivate you and help you see new possibilities for the next phase of your life. So you'll be able to get those and the show notes at JJ virgin dot com. Forward slash the beautiful no. And I'm just beyond excited to share this episode with you now before I do, I want to do a shout out to bua DM bodham, bottom from the USA who said left a little 5 star review on Apple podcasts is awesome, easy to understand and incredibly informative. Subscribe and looking forward to the next episode. So thank you so much for that. Love these reviews because, you know, when you're sitting podcasting, I'm literally podcasting right now from the corner of my bedroom because I'm in a temporary space while we're waiting for our house to be to close over here in Tampa, my new world. And so, you know, sometimes you're over here going hey, anyone listening over here, so these reviews mean everything to me. And this is definitely one of those shows that you're going to want to share with all of your friends. Believe me, this I can't wait. Anyway, I can't wait. I'm not going to waste any more time. I want to share one more favorite with you. And then I will be

Oprah Sherry Salata Harper Studios Sherry Nancy USA Apple Tampa
A highlight from 1694: How to Combine Strength & Endurance Training, When to Add Deficit Deadlifts to Your Workout, Avoiding Weight Gain When Reducing Activity & More (Listener Live Coaching)

Mind Pump

01:11 min | Last week

A highlight from 1694: How to Combine Strength & Endurance Training, When to Add Deficit Deadlifts to Your Workout, Avoiding Weight Gain When Reducing Activity & More (Listener Live Coaching)

"At mind pump media dot com. Now we open the episode with an intro where we talked about some current events and we brought up some studies and talked about our sponsors. Today's intro was 47 minutes long after that we got to the questions. Here's what went down in today's episode. We opened up by talking about the complete sphere of health. It includes much more than just your physical fitness and your diet. Then we talked about the social dilemma documentary, I guess there's some conversations surrounding that and what the right approach is to deal with the potential influence that social media has over our behaviors. Then we talked about Orwell versus Huxley, both have some somewhat dystopian views of the future. Some of them seem to be coming true. Weirdly accurate. Yeah, kind of interesting. Then we talked about adversity and fulfillment. Studies actually show you need to have challenge and adversity in your life in order to feel fulfilled, kinda sucks, but it's true. Then we talked about caldera labs. Caldera makes the best face serums we've ever used in our entire lives. Great skin care products all natural, very effective. And right now, because it's Black Friday, they are having a 30% off sales. The biggest sale of

Huxley Orwell Caldera Labs Caldera
A highlight from The Price We Pay for Stuffing Ourselves Silly | Dr. Vanita Rahman Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

07:06 min | Last week

A highlight from The Price We Pay for Stuffing Ourselves Silly | Dr. Vanita Rahman Live Q&A

"Room podcast brought to you by the physicians committee. Hi, I am the weight loss champion chuck Carroll. Thank you so very much for raising your health IQ with us in more than 130 countries around the world and healthy cities coast to coast in the U.S. like Rockford Illinois, Las Vegas Nevada and Gainesville, Florida. We appreciate you all helping to make the world a healthier place. This is episode 95 of season four, number 290 overall. And our top question today is maybe something that you experienced recently. What happens to your body when you eat a big, old dinner? Maybe even Thanksgiving dinner. We're talking about all of the sides, all of the trimmings, a mountain of mashed potatoes, Turkey piled high if you're not vegan. A river of gravy and then going back for seconds and washing everything down with a slice of pie. But then after you do that, what comes next? Well, the food coma. You are stuffed. You are bloated and you can not keep your eyes open. And it is at that point that your body may ask you, was it worth it? Well, we are going to find out indeed if it was. And what was going on inside of you that gave you that block kind of a feeling. Doctor venita Rahman is here with the science on the true price that you pay for the privilege of stuffing yourself silly. And we're also going to be opening up the doctor's mailbag. And that means that doctor Rahman is answering questions that you guys have sent in. We have questions about detoxing after that big Thanksgiving feast. And what foods are known to cause stress. We also have questions about white meat versus dark meat and is one actually healthier than the other? Plus, a lot of other nutrition questions that we will be feasting on. But before we get to the Q&A, I wanted to let you know that this episode of the exam room is brought to you by kinder beauty, the monthly beauty subscription that delivers the best vegan and cruelty free products right to your door. Each monthly box contains up to $165 worth of beauty and self care products that are kind to your skin and more importantly, kind to animals. And right now, special for the holidays, kinder beauty is being especially kind to the exam roomies such as yourself. Right now get 50% off your first box using the code exam room. That's half off with the code exam room one word when you shop at kinder beauty dot com. And a portion of every kind of beauty sale helps support the physician's committee's work. And you can learn more and take advantage of this special offer right now. By visiting kinder beauty dot com and using the promo code exam room. Time now to get rolling and stuff ourselves with knowledge. Courtesy of the author of the new cookbook simply plant based. Doctor finita raman. Good to see you again, Doc. Oh, great to see you, chuck. Thanks so much for having me. We are here at the most American of all holidays where we just stuff ourselves silly. Thanksgiving, and that is our lead question, though, when we stuff ourselves silly, this is a question from Romain Doc. When we stuff ourselves silly, what actually happens inside of our body? What's going on in there? Yeah, you know, I think you really described so eloquently, what happens at Thanksgiving? We are programmed to eat too much. It's almost normalized in our culture. Thanksgiving. Can't leave the table unless we're feeling stuff. So what's happening at Thanksgiving are a few things. First, it's the type of food we're eating and then it's the quantity of food we're eating. So usually, you know, we're talking about holiday meals and holiday feast. And the food may be when we talk about the food quality it may be high in fat. It may be high in added sugars. It may not contain whole ingredients like whole grains, and maybe made with processed ingredients like processed grains. So we're eating this really this concoction of refined food that's often high in fat, high in calories, high in sugar. So that's one issue. The other issue is we're eating a lot of it, like you said, seconds and thirds. So we're in this in essence, eating twice or three times what we need to eat. And if you can imagine our stomach chuck, it's like a little sack. It's a balloon about this big and it's about the size of her fist. So it's meant to stretch. It's elastic. And it stretches when we eat. Now, that sends a message to the brain to stop eating, but at Thanksgiving, we're eating two to three times the amount and now it's stretching, stretching and we're just ignoring it. And that's stomach is just not where it needs to be. And it's very uncomfortable. That's what leaves us with that bloated, heavy, really sick feeling afterwards. Yeah, I think that there's probably not a person who's listening to this or watching this right now who is unfamiliar with that feeling. I mean, it is something that comes up time and again. And to that fatigue, a lot of people will say, well, the reason why you get tired after you eat a Thanksgiving dinner is because of the Turkey and the tryptophan that's in the Turkey. But is that really just the tryptophan that's causing the drowsiness? Yeah, you know, I think it's multifactorial. Food is supposed to nourish us and energize us, but if we eat the wrong types of food and we eat too much of that food, it's just gonna weigh us down. It's like walking around with a bowling ball. Bodies just so full of this food, you're carrying all this excess food around. It just weighs us down. And I like to picture it like all our bodies energy is going into digesting this food. So there really isn't that much available for us to do the other things we want to do. No question. And, you know, I'm thinking back to when I was really overweight and eating 10,000 calories a day, eat those massive meals. And not once did I feel like I had pep in my step after I ate. It was like nap time as soon as I was through eating. So not necessarily nourishing, but boy, if you wanted to have a good sleep, man, that was it. All right, so now we've had that big old feast. We know what's happening inside of us. Now, let's get all those bad toxins out of the body. Question from Michelle. What would you suggest for detoxing the

Physicians Committee Chuck Carroll Venita Rahman Finita Raman Romain Doc Rockford Gainesville Coma Rahman Turkey Nevada Chuck Las Vegas Illinois Florida U.S. Bowling
A highlight from 1693: The Amount of Muscle a Beginner Can Put on in a Year, the Value of Tricep Kickbacks, How to Get Stronger Without Increasing Calories & More

Mind Pump

04:14 min | Last week

A highlight from 1693: The Amount of Muscle a Beginner Can Put on in a Year, the Value of Tricep Kickbacks, How to Get Stronger Without Increasing Calories & More

"About 1% a year since the 1980s. So it's a bit of a testosterone deficiency or low testosterone epidemic. By the way, the signs of low testosterone in men look like this, right? So low libido, low confidence, low motivation, excess fat gain from where you might not know where it's coming from and muscle weakness. Now, here's something else that's crazy. It looks like a lot of women are suffering from this as well. Low testosterone women and believe it or not women need testosterone as well. The signs are very similar, low libido, load motivation, low confidence, muscle mass going down, excess body fat that seems to be unexplained. There are things you could do naturally to raise your testosterone, but there are also pharmaceutical ways you could balance out your hormones. All right, let's talk about this here. This is a big big issue. This has been an issue for a while too. And I think that it took me a while to figure that out with clients. I remember and it would only happen after I'd have a client who would go back and see their doctor and get blood work and then they'd come back and they would tell me their testosterone levels. But I remember having clients that, you know, man, they seem to be following everything. I said on the diet, they seem to be training and you know, again, we talked about this before where young trainer you think they're lying to you, you know, like this client just gotta be. They gotta be sneaking Snickers bars or not doing the workouts. I'm telling them to or they gotta be lying. And because they're not they're weight isn't changing. They're not losing the body fat. We seem to not be putting muscle on really. I've got all my things in line that I think I'm supposed to, but they're not moving the needle. And then they would finally go see a doctor and get blood worked on and then I'd find out like my 50 year old engineer is like free test is like get one, something. You know, they're at the floor as far as their testosterone levels. And it plays a huge role. And then, of course, going through what I went through from using testosterone using steroids for so many years on and off and then deciding, okay, I'm going to go off completely. Let's see if I can naturally get myself up to a healthy place. And I did that for almost three years, shared that story on the podcast. And man, when you go through it yourself, especially being someone who's in the space and a fitness professional, boy, can I tell what a difference it is when you have low testosterone versus when it's just optimized, you know, like my hormone therapist right now, we just we're not taking a high dose at all. I just keep myself to where you're taking a therapeutic dose. This is embody building. Yeah. So I don't feel like crazy strong. I don't feel like I'm taking a lot. I just feel good and I can see a huge difference on the way my body responds. When I, you know, turn the knobs, start training consistently, dial in the diet. My body composition changes relatively quick versus when it was low, it seemed like I could be perfect for weeks and see little to no change and then the slightest mishap or off the diet and I would put on all this body fat. It's crazy. It's like a vital indication whether or not you're in balance and you're healthy. And it's one of those things that I had to rethink about testosterone because growing up in plain sports, it was so demonized. It was so looked down upon in terms of exogenous hormones and at this point because of the change of the environment because lots of factors remember Carol Hoover brought this up in her book. And it just really set off alarms. We're just in a different landscape now that we really need to consider go getting checked. Where are my levels at? And what's the healthy ranges I should be considered? Yeah, testosterone was unfairly demonized, right? It was demonized because it's been used as a performance enhancing drug. And just like lots of medicines or prescriptions are abused, but testosterone really got demonized to the point where it's like bad for you. It's always bad for you. The truth is, there's a range of levels of testosterone. And by the way, we should get into that, right? We should get into what that range means, but there

Carol Hoover
A highlight from A Doctor a Day Keeps the Apples Away

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

07:42 min | Last week

A highlight from A Doctor a Day Keeps the Apples Away

"Story. A poor diet now outranks smoking as the leading cause of death on the planet as well as specifically in the United States. In the U.S., the number one killer of Americans is the American diet. So if diet is humanity's number one killer, then obviously, it's the number one thing taught in medical school, right? Sadly, medical students around the world are poorly trained in nutrition. It's not that medical students aren't interested in learning about it. Medical schools just aren't teaching it. Without a solid foundation of clinical nutrition knowledge and skills, physicians worldwide are generally not equipped to even begin to have an informed conversation about nutrition with their patients. How bad is it? One study assessing the clinical nutrition knowledge of medical doctors found the majority got 70% of the questions wrong, and there were multiple choice questions so they should have gotten about a 5th right just by chance. And the wrong answers were not limited to difficult or demanding questions. For example, less than half could guess how many calories are in fat carbs and protein, only one in ten knew the recommended protein intake, and only about one in three knew at a healthy BMI was. I mean, this is like super basic nutrition knowledge. And what's worse, not only did the majority of medical doctors get a failing grade, but 30% of those who failed had a high self perception of their clinical nutrition expertise, meaning not only were they clueless about nutrition, they were also clueless that they were clueless about nutrition, particularly bad combination, given that doctors are trusted and influential sources of healthy eating advice. For those majority of consumers who get information from their personal healthcare professional, 78% indicate making a change in their eating habits as a result of those conversations. So if everything that doctor knows, they read in some checkout aisle magazine, that's what the patients are going to be following. Only a quarter of doctors surveyed correctly identified the American Heart Association's recommended number of fruit and vegetable servings per day. And fewer still were aware of the recommended daily added sugar limits. So how are they going to counsel patients on it? Yet again, of the doctors who perceive themselves as having high nutrition knowledge, 93% couldn't answer those two basic multiple choice questions. A physician's with no genuine expertise and say brain surgery are neither likely to broadcast detailed opinions on that topic nor have their quote unquote expert opinions solicited by media. And most topical domains in medicine enjoy such respect. We defer expert opinion in commentary to actual experts, not so with nutrition, where the common knowledge that physicians are generally ill trained in this area is conjoined to routine invitations to physicians for their expert opinions on the matter. All too many are willing to provide their opinions absent any basis for actual expertise or worse made on the basis of bias and personal preference, sometimes directly tethered to personal gain, such as diet book sales. That's one of the reasons all the proceeds I receive from my books are donated directly to charity. I don't even want the appearance of any conflicts of interest. In a culture that routinely fails to distinguish expertise from your opinion or personal anecdote, we physicians should be doing all we can to establish relevant barriers to entry for expert opinion on diet and nutrition as in all other matters of genuine medical significance. I mean, we're not talking celebrity gossip lives are at stake, and there are entire industries devoted to marketing messages that may conspired directly against well inform medical advice in this area. Medical education must be brought up to date for physicians to be ill trained in the very area. Most impactful on the rate of premature death at the population level is an absurd anachronism. The mission of medicine is to protect defend and advance the human condition. That Michigan can not be fulfilled if diet is neglected. Maybe one place to start is for physicians and healthcare organizations to collectively begin to emphasize their seriousness about nutrition and healthcare by practicing what they at least should be preaching. Is it appropriate to serve pizza and soft drinks at a resident conference? Well, bemoaning the high prevalence of obesity, encouraging patients to eat healthier? A similarly poor example exists in medical conferences, including national meetings where some morning sessions are accompanied by foods such as donuts and sausage. In our next story, we look at how more of us might be open to changing our diet and lifestyle if we knew how little modern medicine has to offer. Yes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, but pound isn't that heavy. Why change our diet and lifestyle, we can just wait and let modern medicine fix us up? Previously, I noted that patients tend to wildly overestimate the ability of cancer screening and drugs like cholesterol lowering medications to prevent disease. So much so that the patients were told the truth how little they'd actually benefit 90% said they wouldn't bother taking them. The reason we should eat healthier rather than just counting on a medical techno fix is that the same overconfidence may exist for treatment, too. In a massive study of more than 200,000 trials, they discovered that yes, pills and procedures can certainly help, but genuine, very large effects with extensive support from substantial evidence appear to be rare in medicine, and large benefits for mortality, making people live significantly longer, almost entirely nonexistent. We're great for broken bones and curing infections, but for chronic disease, our leading cause of death and disability, modern medicine doesn't have much to offer. In fact, can sometimes do more harm than good. Side effects from prescription drugs kill an estimated 100,000 Americans every year in effect making medical care the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. But that's just for the deaths from taking medications as prescribed. Another 7000 deaths occur from getting the wrong medication by mistake. 20,000 deaths from other errors in hospitals, hospitals are dangerous places. An additional 80,000 of us die from hospital acquired infections, more recently estimated at 99,000 deaths, but can you really blame doctors for these deaths? You can when they don't wash their hands. We've known since the 1840s that the best way to prevent hospital acquired infections is through hand washing, yet compliance rates among healthcare workers rarely exceeds 50% and doctors are the worst. Even in a medical intensive care unit, even if you slap up a contact precaution sign, signaling particularly high risk less than a quarter of doctors wash their hands. Many physicians greeted the horrendous mortality data due to medical error with disbelief, and concerned that the information would undermine public trust. But if doctors still don't even wash their hands, how much trust do we deserve? So you could go into for a simple operation and come out with a life threatening infection or

United States Mission Of Medicine American Heart Association Obesity Michigan Chronic Disease Cancer
A highlight from 1692: Rethinking Entrepreneurship With Basecamp Founder David Hansson

Mind Pump

02:30 min | Last week

A highlight from 1692: Rethinking Entrepreneurship With Basecamp Founder David Hansson

"David you are for all intents and purposes a very successful entrepreneur. I would say obviously a tech entrepreneur having started Ruby on Rails and helping with base camp and you've written some really great books like rework, but the way you've done it doesn't fit at all with the stereotype of the tech entrepreneur avatar. I would like to hear from you and I love when you talk about this. I've heard you talk about this many times. I would love for you to talk about the most. I guess dangerous or terrible myths surrounding entrepreneurship, especially in regards to tech entrepreneurship. Yeah, no, topic I've been ranting about for damn near almost 20 years. And so much of it is just this hero creation myth that it seems like every tech entrepreneur needs an origin story fit for Superman. That they went through all these amazing challenges and then they worked 80 or a hundred hours a week for 20 years and then boom, this is why they deserve to be at the top of the mountain. And I never had a relationship with that way of working. I think perhaps partly because I'm Danish and that was just not a part of Danish culture. And by the time I arrived in the U.S., those things were set in me pretty well. I'd already achieved certain things just working from Denmark, working part time. We created base camp, the project management app that we're still running almost 20 years later on ten hours a week. Not ten hours a day, not a hundred hour weeks. So I just encountered this incredible just disconnect with what I was experiencing with the way we were building our business and what everyone else in the tech community seemed to be banging on the drum about. And for a long time, I thought, this is just so puzzling. Why is this? Why is it that we can work normal hours have 40 hour work weeks and still create what we're creating that seems to be resonating pretty well and compare very fairly to all sorts of competitors? And then everyone else in the tech industry seems to be banging on, like, oh, you gotta work the 8 hours. You gotta work the hundred hours. I remember reading an article by Marissa Mayer saying you can actually work a 130 hours a week if you're strategic with your bathroom breaks.

David Denmark U.S. Marissa Mayer
A highlight from Stop letting the number on the scale define you with past client, Kerry

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

08:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Stop letting the number on the scale define you with past client, Kerry

"Without guilt by becoming an intuitive eater and giving diet culture the middle finger. A stressful relationship with food often begins when we are really young and can carry into our adulthood, impacting our feelings and behaviors towards food to this very day. A stressful relationship with food can start when we are so young, so it can make it feel really normalized. And there is no other way to view food, but that's simply not true. On the episode today, I have my past client Carrie here to share how she escaped a life long weight loss journey. That began when she was only 8 years old. This weight loss journey continued with Carrie through her early 30s until she decided it was time to make a change. Thanks to a lifetime of dieting and being led to believe that her body was wrong, Carrie struggled to lie with over exercising with thinking she had to exercise to earn her food, that all or nothing mentality around food and feeling the need to track every single thing that she ate. This left Carrie feeling so ashamed exhausted, and often hangry from the extreme restriction that she put herself through that would inevitably backfire into rebellious eating. By the end of today's episode, you will not only feel totally inspired, but you will also get exclusive tips from Carrie herself on how she made peace with food. How she now moves for the right reasons, how she learned how to honor her fullness and how she is now able to keep all of her favorite foods at home without guilt or obsession. As a reminder, today's episode is for informational and educational purposes only, and it is not a substitute for individual medical care or advice. A quick trigger warning before we start, today's episode does include calorie talk. So if hearing this is triggering, feel free to skip today's episode. Before we dive into all the goodness today, I'd love to ask you to leave an honest rating and review if you have found the diet culture rebel podcast, helpful to you on your food freedom journey. Let's face it, diet culture is powerful and it impacts so many people. People just like you, your loved friends and family members, people like Carrie, who is on today's podcast, diet culture can impact any and everyone. But I believe that the intuitive eating and health at every size message can be really powerful too. And I'd love to ask for your help to grow my podcast and make sure that this message is reaching more vulnerable people who need to hear it and heal their own relationship with food in themselves. Ratings and reviews are the best way to support my podcast. So if the diet culture rebel podcast has benefited you pause this episode right now and go ahead and leave an honest rating and review. This is simple yet so powerful and I know will help other people be able to heal their relationship with food. All right, let's get into today's episode. I began our conversation by asking Carrie to introduce herself to everyone. Hi Bonnie, thanks so much for having me. My name is Carrie, obviously, just said that. I am guys. Before I'd be like somebody who was on their weight loss journey and now I'm just, I'm a woman in her 30s. I live in my hometown of Las Vegas Nevada. I traveled a little bit for work, ended up coming back here. But yeah, I'm just really excited to be here. Awesome. I'm so happy to have you here and I love how you said before you would have described yourself as a woman on your weight loss journey. And it sounds like now you kind of moved away from that, which is awesome and we're definitely going to dive into that today. And I also know the listeners, you can't see Carrie right now, but she's sitting outside and it just looks so beautiful where she is, so I wish you could see her scenery, but it looks awesome. So anyways, let's dive into today's episode. I recently looked at the goals that you set forth when we started working together. And we started working together. It was a while ago. So about, I believe it was November of last year, which is so cool that I have known you for this long. But I remember that your first two goals were to eat without guilt and then to separate eating and exercise. So I'm wondering if you can take us back to the carry group coaching, the weight loss woman carry and let us know what your relationship with food and your body was like at that time in your life. Yeah, most definitely. And I was thinking about that a lot this morning before we got on here about who I was, what was that? Ten months ago now. And I was a very different person, obviously, I was somebody who'd been on some sort of diet or wait cycling since I was 8 years old just for a time 33. So a quarter of my life has been spent trying to lose weight, which is now that I look back at it at a not the best way to spend especially in those your formative years of growing up. And finding out who you are. But the person I was at that time in my life and where I was in my weight loss journey at the time, I was always trying to only say it around 1415 hundred calories a day. But if I didn't because I never could because I was always starving, I was like, okay, well, I can eat more, but I have to exercise to earn that food. And so I was exercising three, four plus hours a day. And intense exercising, why 500 calories an hour, 500 to 600. I was walking my dogs like crazy. I was doing these crazy workouts. And I would get irritable. It's like I couldn't work out or if I ate more than and I didn't work out and a lot of the times and the person that I was then would not something when I went on. If it was not on I had already tracked it, that's what I'm eating if I attracted I'm eating everything on my plate even if I was full by attracted and wanted something else. I'm eating what I tracked and not what I wanted. I never let my house have leeway or if I did, I was ashamed of myself and I felt like I had to go work out and feel better about eating not even like take or anything like that. It's like eating like a chipotle bowl or something like that that I had made to a salad or something that didn't have really a whole lot of nutrition density there like it was just like Belize and maybe some chicken and balsamic. Happy those days are gone. Yeah. So very forced trying to stay in a smaller body and live in a or try and lose weight. Any time I noticed my point was going up, I run back to a diet right away. Wow. Wow. So this started at 8 years old and then it went to when you were well, I know you're 33 now. We started working together last year. So I'm guessing till when you were maybe 32? Yes. That's a long time. Yeah. That's a very long time. Yeah. But I feel like that's so relatable because for so many of us, the relationship with food that we have as an adult or the reason why we diet, or a reason that contributes to it is because of our upbringing. And, you know, like, what our relationship with food was like as a child. So it just sounds like so much that you went through, you know, with this restriction, the amount of calories you were eating, and I know that in our world, the number of calories you share that you were eating it sounds so normal. Sometimes even generous compared to the number of calories that are recommended by some diets, but seriously, that is still extreme restriction, like starvation, what you were saying, and obviously it had a huge impact on so much of your life with, you know, your relationship with exercise, how it sounds like. It just made you feel like you had to work out to earn food or burn off food that you ate and things like that just sounds so controlling. So I think I'd like to hear from you, how did

Carrie Bonnie Nevada Las Vegas
A highlight from How to Navigate People Who Constantly Use Triggering Diet Talk

Food Heaven Podcast

06:44 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Navigate People Who Constantly Use Triggering Diet Talk

"Happy holidays y'all this week we are doing something a little different. We are going to be rearing one of our most popular episodes, which I think is super timely during this time of the year. And it is how to navigate triggering diet and body talk, especially during the holidays. You're already know how that goes. You show up to these family gatherings or gatherings with your Friends and everybody got an opinion about how your body has changed, especially with COVID or the foods that you're eating, the foods that you're not eating. And so I think you're really enjoy this episode. We really touch on practical things that you can do to navigate these things. Also, wanted to let you know that on Monday, December 6th, we are going to be doing an IG live event. We haven't done these in a minute. So it's super exciting market calendar is going to be a 7 p.m. eastern, and we are going to be teaming up with MS advocate Azor antonette. We're going to be talking about the important role of food and nutrition for people who have chronic conditions and chronic pain. For people who have multiple sclerosis, it could be really hard to do a lot of these changes that are promoted as healthy. And so we're going to be talking about potential considerations that people should take into account, living with a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis, and I am actually going to be doing a food demo. We're going to be cooking so come through des and I will be there. It's always going to share her insight about how she approaches nutrition as someone who's been living with MS for over ten years. And this event is part of Janssen's more to MS campaign, which supports people living with MS with educational resources to help them live well to learn more. You can visit more to MS dot com. Make sure that you join us. It's going to be on our page so you can go to food heaven on Instagram, December 6th, at 7 p.m. eastern four p.m. Pacific. All right, y'all. Let's get into this episode. So what are we talking about today, girl? Girl, today is a heavy ish heavy ish topic. We're talking about how to deal with diet talk. And this has been requested actually a lot. And it almost kind of indirectly because people may send us a DM and say, hey, they want advice on how to deal with this. And then we realized we're getting so many of these different indirect questions about this that it would be really nice to have a podcast episode. On how to deal with it. So just to give you guys kind of background information on what is diet hawk and why some people might find it triggering. So I found this definition that I really like from the company nourish Rx and they write that diet talk includes any conversation around restricting foods, slash food groups to lose weight or exercise for the sake of wanting to change our body weight shape or size. Diet talk isn't limited to diets in the most obvious sense, such as Whole30 keto paleo Atkins macro county. It is swirling around us even in the most mundane conversations. And so why is this problematic for some people? Well, as people start to embrace more of the intuitive eating and health at every size ideals when it comes to their well-being and how they're taking care of themselves. You know, it's easy to really get triggered by everyone else who's doing something completely different, right? They're on the Whole30 or they want to talk to you about keto or people are posting before and after pictures or family members. You know, you go to dinner and they're not eating any carbs at the meal. And so people find it really hard to know how to navigate this. So we thought it'd be great to talk about it on the podcast today. And you might be wondering, well, I don't understand the big deal. If somebody wants to do macro counting, to lose weight, why is that a problem? Well, one of the reasons, you know, if you look at some of the research with health at every size and intuitive eating, the idea is that up to 95% of people who try to lose weight on a diet are really not able to sustain that weight long term. And in fact, two thirds of those folks gain back even more weight. And so when people are really embracing intuitive eating and health at every size, they're also essentially saying goodbye to diets and hello to learning about how to take care of themselves by discovering their unique blueprint for wellness. So this can be, again, kind of triggering for them when they're hearing about all these DIA talks. So Wendy, I'm wondering, can you think of an example of when someone has started talking about their diet or their body negatively around you? Oh my God, girl, all the time, a gun because we're dieticians. I think it's just very normal because people think that we are the chosen person to talk. These things with. And yeah, I hate it. But yeah, last week I had a close friend who was here at my house and we were talking about lots of different things. But anyways, his friend was talking about how they feel self conscious about their weight. And I think they were just venting about not being happy about their body and it was one on one. So I think that in that case, I tend to have more energy to really dig deep into these things and have a dialog because when it's in a group setting, I just get very overwhelmed and I shut down and it's like, I don't want to be the person to kind of lead the conversation or whatever. But in this case, we really dove deep into these issues and kind of like the root of it and where it's coming from and talking about different insecurities and stuff. And it was a great conversation that I've had many times with this friend because this is stuff that takes time. And I'm sure that we'll have the conversation again. But specifically, they were talking about how it's manifesting in their relationship and their intimate relationship because they are self esteem has been impacted because of body changes, especially during COVID. Yeah, that's a really great point and it's something that's coming up a lot in the work that I do with my clients one on one in terms of people have gained some weight during coronavirus, you know. And that has had an impact on some of my clients, self esteem, and a lot of them are even more vulnerable to this diet talk because of it. One example that came up recently, you know, this idea of diet talk was, I don't know if you saw that Instagram Live that Jillian Michaels did. Wendy. Did you see it? I did not

Azor Antonette IG Janssen Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis Instagram DIA Wendy Jillian Michaels
A highlight from #414: Will Machine Learning Overtake Traditional Nutrition Research Methods?

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:08 min | Last week

A highlight from #414: Will Machine Learning Overtake Traditional Nutrition Research Methods?

"Of the team on the podcast as well, which we'll get introduction to in just a moment. Today we're going to be talking about the topic of machine learning and data science within nutrition research going forward. And essentially, we're going to be discussing a claim around whether machine learning and data science can overtake traditional research methods within nutrition. Before we get to the setup of the episode, let me introduce the latest member of the sigma nutrition team as some of you may have seen through our recent posts on the website as well as on social media. We have a new data and research analyst on the team. Doctor neve aspire. So neve welcome to the show and maybe to start, can you give people an introduction to yourself, you're kind of research background and anything else you might think they'll find interesting. Okay, cool. Yeah, thank you so much for the introduction. And yeah, I'm really excited and happy to start joining your conversations and working with you both. So just a little background for myself, I suppose, maybe it's not so linear, but I have a degree in human nutrition. And during my undergrad, I worked on various different research projects. So they kind of focused on exploring different nutrients data, so vitamin D status B vitamins on different health icons in older adults, so we specifically focused on cognitive and physical function. And this is an area that I became really interested in after my PhD then as well. So I spent some time working in the institute in neuroscience and Trinity College in Dublin, and I decided that I wanted to kind of merge the fields of kind of nutrition and neuropsychology and psychiatry into the basis of my PhD. So I worked with a Professor of old age psychiatry and Trinity College, those professor Brian baldr and so her backgrounds more clinical nutrition. So we kind of merge both of those disciplines to create a PhD project on vitamin D supplementation and different outcomes in older adults. So we focus on cognitive health and did a small bit on physical health as well. So what might PhD research, I suppose it was divided into two streams of analysis, those thought of predictive based analysis, a.m. exploratory observation that allows us looking at different determinants of vitamin D deficiency and we observed kind of new and contributions to that area of work. And we also looked at kind of physical performance and vitamin D and I suppose all of that work then was fed in or some of the findings were fed into the design of the first double blind placebo controlled trial for vitamin D supplementation and cognitive health in community on older adults. So I designed that intervention run that intervention and got some really good kind of conclusions from that work. I also did a post grad and applied statistics of a bit of experience in that area. And I kind of brought that into my next bit of work, which was an adult social care, where I kind of looked at analyzing risks of dependent older adults who are receiving home support on their likelihood of transitioning into long-term care, so needing more support brought in some nutrition there folks and kind of on malnutrition. Innovative food clinical trial company in Ireland. I was a scientific manager involved me working with different nutrition reasons that could have been design and obtain ethical approval for their safety test. I'm going to work it on is respondent just to Raphael, but the moment what I'm projects kind of focusing more on tech or tills in healthcare. So my work kind of focuses on evaluating and ensuring that that tech is developed in an ethical and socially responsible way. So yeah, that's my background. Awesome. And that will, of course, be very relevant for much of what we're going to discuss today. And of course, also here with us is as usual, mister Allen flanagan. So welcome Allen. Thank you. And welcome to if I'm excited now to have a part of the team and our future discussions and content creation. So it's going to be going to be a nice nice ability now to really tease things apart, especially today I hadn't particularly looked that much into I've come across it in different papers. And I've been familiar just from people asking me about it a little bit with the predict study as an example. But it's not something I had delved into a huge amount the whole area of data science and generally independent of nutrition and then in relation to its potential application for nutrition. So the last few days have been interesting to say the least. So yeah, I think this is going to be certainly for listeners. I'd hope that if anything it's going to be something that they find. Novel, as a discussion, because I can't see that anywhere else is kind of delved into

Neve Aspire Institute In Neuroscience And Brian Baldr Neve Trinity College Dublin Mister Allen Flanagan Raphael Ireland Allen
A highlight from 1691: How Isometrics Build Muscle, Why Working Out More Can Actually Slow Your Gains, the Benefits of Regular Vs. Hex Bar Deadlifts & More

Mind Pump

01:11 min | Last week

A highlight from 1691: How Isometrics Build Muscle, Why Working Out More Can Actually Slow Your Gains, the Benefits of Regular Vs. Hex Bar Deadlifts & More

"Dot com slash mine pump. Then we talk about Channing Tatum, Justin was super excited. Yeah. He was in his neighborhood. Yeah. Then we talked about, what was that group called brass against? I guess they're cover band for raging against the machine. You won't believe the special bonus punk rock move ever. The special bonus of fan got onstage by attending one of the shows. I know Doug just bought tickets to the next one. It was golden. Then we talked about universal basic mobility in Oakland. They're experimenting with all kinds of new products. And then we talked about companies dividing up to focus on different things. So that was a cool part of the conversation. Then we got to the question. So here's the first one that we answered. This person wants to know how much more progress can be made with four gym sessions versus three. So how much better results am I doing at more more four days a week versus three? The next question? This person wants to know the differences between a traditional deadlift and a trap bar deadlift or a hex bar deadlift? The third question, this person wants to know about isometrics. What do they do for the body? How do you program them? What's the deal? Then the final question, this person wanted some advice because they want to start an online coaching and fitness business.

Channing Tatum Justin Doug Oakland
A highlight from How Does Fake Meat Affect Your Microbiome?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:11 min | Last week

A highlight from How Does Fake Meat Affect Your Microbiome?

"The market for these plant based meat alternatives is growing super fast. But some people are questioning whether these highly processed foods really are a better choice in terms of nutrition or the environment. And these days we're also curious about how various foods and dietary patterns affect the microbiome, which in turn influences so many aspects of our health. And there's some new research on that to share. But first, let me clarify what type of foods we're talking about today. I'm not talking about cultured meat products, which are actual meat but produced without animals. If you'd like to hear more about that, check out my episode number 596 on lab grown meats. I'm also not referring to veggie burgers bean burgers. And other products which aren't trying to mimic the flavor and the texture of meat, or at least they're not trying very successfully. I'm talking about products that are designed not just to stand in for meat, but to mimic it with increasing verisimilitude. For example, impossible burger, beyond burger, and meatless farm all have products that look and cook just like raw ground beef. They're often sold right next to the actual ground beef at the grocery store, and their packaged so similarly that if you weren't paying attention, you might easily think that they were ground beef. Now, these types of plant based meat alternatives are not intended for people who find the idea of eating meat disgusting. These are for people who really enjoy eating meat, but feel like it might be better for their health or for the health of the planet not to. But would it? Let's take a closer look at how they stack up starting with the nutrition. While old school veggie burgers are often lower in fat and calories, these new plant based meat alternatives are formulated to be much closer to the nutrient profile of meat. They have close to the same amount of protein, fat and calories, some of them even have the same amount of saturated fat, and heme iron. That's a form of iron that's normally only found in animal foods. So they may not offer the same nutritional advantages that people generally expect from a vegetarian diet. Now, you know me, I can't resist making charts and tables and graphs and I have made one with a detailed nutritional comparison of several different plant based beef alternatives and actual ground beef and also grass fed ground beef. So if you want to see all the numbers, you'll find that on my blog at nutrition over easy dot com. Now, one advantage that these plant based meat alternatives do retain is that they do not create heterocyclic amines, HCAs when they're grilled. These compounds are created when meat or fish are cooked over direct or high heat, and they have been linked to cancer. But the amino acids involved in this reaction are only present in animal muscle tissue. So grilling a plant based burger is not going to create those HCAs and does not cause this danger. But I want you to remember that the context in which we consume an individual food also matters. One of the ways that eating a lot of say hamburgers might drag down the nutritional quality of your diet is not necessarily the burger itself, but what goes with it, the bun, the French fries. The soda or the milkshake. So simply inserting a plant based burger instead of a beef patty into a fast food meal, obviously is not going to mitigate all of those other factors. And finally, it's worth mentioning that these plant based alternatives are all considered ultra processed foods. This is a category of foods that were supposed to be as chewing. Ultra processed foods are those in which a large proportion of the ingredients are not foods or ingredients that you might use in your own kitchen. Rather their extracts isolates fractions, concentrates additives and other industrially manipulated compounds. Diets that contain a lot of ultra processed foods have been linked with a lot of adverse health outcomes. But I think it's also worth taking into account the purpose that the processing serves. In this case, the primary purpose of all that processing is not to turn cheap ingredients into irresistible, high calorie snack foods that have a high profit margin and an indefinite shelf life, rather it's done in order to produce a plant based product that is sufficiently similar to meat that a meat lover would be willing or even happy to have it instead. I think some would argue that in this case, the downside of more processing is offset by the upside of not eating meat. And that argument might be even more compelling if your primary motivation for avoiding meat is a concern for the impact on animals or the environment as opposed to the effect on your own

Cancer
A highlight from Thanksgiving Classics Made Vegan | Audrey Dunham and Dustin Harder

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:32 min | Last week

A highlight from Thanksgiving Classics Made Vegan | Audrey Dunham and Dustin Harder

"Welcome to the exam room podcast, brought to you by the physicians committee. Hi, I am the weight loss champion chuck Carroll. Thank you so very much for racing your health IQ with us in more than 130 countries around the world and in healthy cities coast to coast in the U.S. like Idaho Falls Idaho. Laredo, Texas, and lacrosse Wisconsin. We appreciate you all helping to make the world a healthier place. This is episode 94 of season four. Number 289 overall. And if you are still working on your Thanksgiving menu, don't worry. This is the show for you. Because we have not one, but two, creative culinary geniuses here with us today. First up is Audrey Dunham. She is the founder of peanuts bake shop and the wife of comedian Jeff Dunham. But more importantly, Audrey is also the author of the new book, vegan Thanksgiving dinner and pies. Which, as the title suggests, turns all of your Thanksgiving favorites into vegan masterpieces. So we are going to get a lot of great ideas from Audrey and just a minute. Then after that, we're also going to be joined by my newest colleague who also happens to be a social media star. Dustin harder is his name, but you may know him better as the vegan roadie. He is actually joining us from his kitchen today. How appropriate? And he and I are going to have a lot of fun because I stumbled across a list of the most popular Thanksgiving side dishes for all 50 states. So we're going to run down that list and see how hard it will be to take all of the meat. All of the dairy out of those favorites and then flip them into vegan crowd pleasers. And there are some real surprises on the list too. Just wait until you hear what North Dakota's main side dish is. And here's a hint. You've really don't need to do too much of anything to veganize it. As a matter of fact, you may not need to do anything at all. But we start with Audrey Dunham and what's cooking for Thanksgiving and her vegan, California kitchen.

Physicians Committee Chuck Carroll Audrey Dunham Audrey Idaho Falls Laredo Dustin Harder Jeff Dunham Idaho Wisconsin Texas U.S. North Dakota California
A highlight from 400  Celebrating 400 Podcast Episodes and 500,000 Downloads

Health Quest Podcast

03:42 min | Last week

A highlight from 400 Celebrating 400 Podcast Episodes and 500,000 Downloads

"So that's quite an accomplishment. I'm quite proud that we have been influential over that many episodes, interviews, digging deep into the science of nutrition. That's what we do here. It's been my pleasure to do it all these years. And every 100 shows I pause to take a look at the state of the industry. How is the health food, health supplement, nutrition, industry, fairing? What are some of the challenges? Having been in this industry for over 45 years, I understand many of the challenges that are being faced both by independent health food retailers as well as small retailers in just about every industry. There are challenges. I've discussed some of these challenges in my past reviews. So if you want an interesting look back over what have been the challenges, look at the podcast number 102 103 hundred, and now 400, where we talk about the state of the industry and the state of affairs. We take a look at some of the challenges. So today we're going to look back at some of what I think are perhaps the most significant developments over the last few years since I did episode 300. So we're going to talk about the dietary supplement health and education act. I'm not sure how many people actually remember the de times. This goes back to the early 90s when the FDA wanted to take all dietary supplements off the shelves and make them illegal until they were tested like prescription drugs. Hundreds of thousands, hundreds of millions of dollars in science in order to prove that vitamin D is effective or that zinc is effective or some of these other nutrients that have all this good science behind it. So deshay was the attempt of the FDA to curtail curb, perhaps even destroy the supplement market. It's an interesting story and we're going to look at it in depth in upcoming interview. And so over the next few weeks pay attention and you'll hear our interview where we talk about the Shay and some of the challenges and some of the benefits that has come about. I happen to have been the leader of citizens for health in Wisconsin. I was lobbyist in Washington when all the health food stores and help food companies went to Washington to talk to the legislators. And what came out of that three year battle was in 1994 Congress passed the dietary supplement health and education act to Shea. Prior to deshay, the FDA had a definition of food, drugs, and cosmetics. And so they tried to fit supplements into those categories where they just didn't fit. They're not foods because they're not used in the preparation of a meal. They're not cosmetics because they're taken internally. Therefore they must be drugs. That was the only category left. And so this was the position of the FDA. So after three years of fighting, lobbying, grassroots support hundreds of thousands of letters into Congress, de chaise was passed overwhelmingly with 100% support in both houses of Congress.

FDA Washington Wisconsin Shea Congress De Chaise
A highlight from Reduce Anxiety With Food

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:01 min | Last week

A highlight from Reduce Anxiety With Food

"Wellness. If you have been experiencing more anxiety over the past 20 months, than you ever have in the past, well, just know that you're not alone. According to a new study, it was done by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. More United States adults are reporting having symptoms of both anxiety and depression during this COVID-19 pandemic. So currently they state that about 42% of adults are reporting to struggle with anxiety and depression. So that's most half of the adult population. So again, I just want to repeat if that is you, if you're one of those experiencing anxiety or depression, you're definitely not alone. Now it's no news that we have been and are currently remaining to be in a very stressful time. So today, on our show, we want to let you know what you can do personally to relieve some of that anxiety and depression. There's so many things out of our control these days, but there are some things that are in our control. And that is what we put into our mouths. What we're eating, what we're drinking. And some of you may be thinking, well, I could just take a medication and that will help my anxiety and depression. And I'm not saying, you know, stop your medication by any means. You'd want to work with a professional with that. But as nutritionists and dietitians at nutritional weight and wellness, we know that so many improvements can be made for our moods through eating better. What does eating better mean you might be wondering that and how can that help to manage anxiety and depression? Well, those are the questions that we are going to address today. So I better introduce myself. My name is Cara carper. I'm a certified nutrition specialist. I'm also a licensed nutritionist. And I will be sharing some personal stories because I've experienced a lot of anxiety, especially before I join the team at nutritional weight and wellness. And after I started working here, I really started to make those connections about that whatever I was eating or drinking or not eating or drinking. Affected my anxiety. So I'll share more about that today. But I also want to I would like to introduce my co host Carolyn Hudson, Carolyn is a registered and licensed dietitian. Now Carolyn, first of all, it's great to see you. Forever. The pandemic. I feel like we're all kind of in our own little world. But Carolyn, you have made some exciting future plans. And although I'm sad for me and nutritional weight and wellness, I'm very excited for you. Would you just mind sharing with our listeners? Some of the changes you're going to be making in your life. Well, sure, Kara. Good morning, good morning Cara and all of our listeners out there. I started my career as a dietician, way back in the 80s. I won't even give the specific 80s. But I've decided now at my age, it's time to retire and travel and start doing some different things. That's so exciting. Congratulations. It's exciting, but it's a little scary, too. You know, I've worked for a long, long time, and I love my job. I love working at nutritional weight and wellness. I love helping clients. So I'm going to really, really miss that part of it. So after November, I'm not going to be seeing clients in the office or even zoom or any of those things anymore. For any of those individual nutrition counseling or therapies.

Depression Center For Disease Control And Cara Carper Carolyn Carolyn Hudson Anxiety United States Kara Cara
A highlight from Biohacking Perimenopause with Alisa Vitti

Ask The Health Expert

08:00 min | Last week

A highlight from Biohacking Perimenopause with Alisa Vitti

"They're good to be back, JJ. How are you? I am great. Well, it's always good to talk to you about this because I get badgered with questions about perimenopause and you are such a voice of reason. I'm such great, easy, explanations and strategies. So I'm super excited to dive in. And you know, I thought this might be an interesting place to start. It's kind of one O one basic, but I mean, how would a woman actually know that she's in perimenopause? What constitutes this? What makes someone in this? I love you this question. Yeah, I love this question because there is so much confusion, right? People say perimenopause, they say menopause. They don't know where they are. And we really do need some specific structure to understand where are you on the timeline. So here's how it works. Starting at 35, for every woman, the brain begins the process of perimenopause, which is this transitional phase like puberty, but in reverse, which takes a decade or longer, just like puberty does, right? Puberty starts in the brain at 9, but you don't start to see physical symptoms until 12, 14, et cetera et cetera, and they increase in there, you know? Presentations, right? And it completes around 22 in the brain. Para menopause starts at 35, you may not notice a thing for 7 to ten years in terms of your cycle. You could still have regular ovulation, regular menstruation. That is wonderful. In fact, you should strive for that. The longer you ovulate regularly, the more you bank, cardio, neuro and osteoporosis for when you are no longer cycling. So it's a good thing to slow down this process. Then so that's what I call stage one Perry menopause. Approximately 35 to 45. What's happening in the brain is that slowly slowly, your body is making more and more follicular stimulating hormone. When it crosses a certain threshold, over a certain number like 14 to 16, right? Then we're at a place where you are going to start having irregular ovulation. And eventually, when that number gets high enough, you will not ovulate anymore. And then we sort of begin in that process. That's where this perimenopause completes. But stage one, there's still your FSH levels are still fine. You're still ovulating still menstruating, stage two, 45 to 52. Approximately that FSH level is going to creep up. You're going to have skipping of the ovulation you may have skipping of cycles and then you may go on this fun putting that near quotes estrogen roller coaster that creates a bunch of symptoms. So that's the journey, and then it culminates with menopause, which is the last bleed, and then 12 months after that, you are then considered postmenopausal if you do not have another period. And you can count 12 consecutive months. So you said you had the kind of fun in air quotes, I would say yeah, just wait. And what happens is estrogen starts to shift and drop, like, what are some of those symptoms that people might start to notice? And it's not just that it drops actually. The issue is that it goes like erratically up and down in response to this changing situation inside your brain and ovaries around not ovulating. So it's the roller coaster that can create the issues around or that could exacerbate the issues around hot flashes and night sweats and mood swings and vaginal dryness and some weight gain in these types of things. But I think we're going about taking care of our perimenopause journey. Not the right way. I think we could do better. I think we could dial it in better. And here's why, because we wait until stage two to take care of it. At that point, if we haven't been taking care of our cycle leading up to that, and you have had, let's say, unaddressed PMS for who knows three decades, you should plan on having perimenopause symptoms that feel like you're in a constant state of CMS, right? Because that's the whole problem there. You're having spiking and dropping estrogen levels at rapid rates and you're having a cessation in the production of progesterone, right? So now you don't have enough to oppose that estrogen. So you could feel like you're in chronic PMS all the time. But if we can start to take care of our cycles earlier and start to use supplements strategically at 35. There's a lot that we can do to not only prolong stage one, but mitigate dramatically what happens in stage two. And that's also where we have to change diet and lifestyle again. So there's sort of a diet and lifestyle supplement kind of thing that you want to do in 35 to 45 and then if you want to switch things up after 45. Okay, well, this is great information. So the tracking your cycle, so the 35 to 45, what should you be looking for in your cycle? What would tell you that things are a little bit off? And how should you be tracking this? You know, I think it depends on how deep down the rabbit hole you go, but using any tracker, we have a tracker called my flow that you can use to get yourself oriented to the cycle and the different phases of the cycle. But you can also use that in accompaniment with a basal body temperature tracker to see what's happening if you are ovulating. If you want to go even deeper, you can use one that you can there's a urine Alice that you can do on a testing strip that connects wirelessly to a device. That will let you know if you're having that LH surge. All of this is really for you to start to really track ovulation. You want to see if you're still ovulating. And this is an important thing to do. You can also then do some at home hormone fertility testing, right? Again, not for fertility purposes, but to see what is happening with FSH. You can do that, I would say every 6 to 9 months during this stage just so you can really keep an eye on what's happening with FSH because it's going to really tell you where you are in this timeline that we've talked about. Tracking symptoms is important as well. So again, if you have PMS, every single luteal phase, 35 to 40, don't brush that off and say, oh, well, it's just normal. I'm just moody and cranky and hungry and tired and acne. You want to really do what you can to boost progesterone production and support estrogen metabolism. So that again, you're really keeping yourself because what we're talking about here in order for you to do that is to stay micronutrient rich. The more full of healthy balanced micronutrients you are going into stage two, the better your experience is going to be. If you go into it, which so many women do, totally depleted from if you've had kids, depleted from childbirth, if you're have a career, depleted from stress, if you drink alcohol and caffeine, depleted from that, if you have a history of taking synthetic birth control, micronutrients get depleted. I mean, there's so many ways in which you are just leaking out essential micronutrients that then put you in a deficit position as you go through this very major transition after 45 that makes it worse and it doesn't need to be that way if you get strategic about it. So track it up. We're definitely going to talk about 45 plus and what to do if you hadn't done anything yet. So we don't worry. But let's say you're listening in your 35 to 45. What are some of the key things in terms of diet and supplements that you should

Confusion Perry
Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

"Two thousand nine. A team of researchers discovered a previously unknown microbe in the hot springs of yellowstone national park now. The fungus is the star ingredient in a new line of food products. He was very very high in protein. And it's actually a very exciting protein because it's a complete protein. There's really not that many sources of complete putting out there. That's thomas jonas. Ceo of nature's find the chicago based startup developed a process to ferment. the fungus and create. What's now called five protein. They're using it to make a variety of foods so we've been able to make things that range from chicken nuggets hamburgers breakfast sausages to yogurts and cheese earlier this year. The company offered a limited line of cream cheese and breakfast sausage on its website. Jonas says the products will soon be sold at stores. He foresees growing demand for protein. Filled foods produce more sustainably than meat and dairy that whole supply chain is completely inefficient and using a tremendous amount of resources of land of water energy. So jonas says fi could provide a more climate-friendly alternative.

Thomas Jonas Yellowstone National Park Nuggets Chicago Jonas
The Gut-Brian Axis

Food for Thought

01:28 min | 2 months ago

The Gut-Brian Axis

"Now is a good time to go into the evidence surrounding something could the gut brain axes i guess kind of it is and why suddenly become not suddenly. I'm bane. i guess discovered why it's important. Yeah great ray. And it is so much in evidence around the gut brain access and what we do know from. The studies is that the gut brain axis is all these microbes have a two way communication between basically the entering nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract so alcott and the central nervous system. Which is the brain the vegas nerve and is referred to as the gut brain axis now. This communication occurs via the power sympathic nervous system which also is known as the rest and digest mode and this is the complete opposite response to our sympathetic nervous system. Which is that fight or flight mode which gets us ready. But the power sympathetic returns our body to the state of calm and rest whereas the sympathetic massive nervous system get the body ready for that fight or flee which can increase blood pressure breathing slowing down at digestion and take him blood and oxygen away to other parts of the body. So it's important that people know is this of two way. Communication almost like a highway caused going back and forth between the garden rain.

Vegas
The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

Diet Science

02:27 min | 2 months ago

The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

"Week. We're talking about oats. Oh so very good. I always feel that everyone needs to know oats. Yes absolutely so. What would you like to share about oats well other than than the the typical health benefits votes. There's actually two compounds in oats that i don't think very many people know about and so wanted to talk about those today but then also talk about the various types of oats. I think a lot of people have heard of these different types but they don't really know how they're prepared and what makes them different from each other. Good good good topic all right. Yeah so. I think most people probably know that oats Help lower cholesterol. He also helped to lower blood pressure and stabilize blood. Sugar levels have also been known to help people with diabetes. So that's a one of the important things and a lot of these benefits In the past were attributed to a particular type of fiber that's in the oats called beta glue can And that has really kind of gotten most of the attention in previous studies on oats and their health benefits. But we're coming to find out that Oats contain more than twenty unique polyphenol compounds which are like phytochemicals Called evanston reminds have strong antioxidant anti inflammatory and anti itching properties which is why people can use. Oats says a bath like if you get poison oak or poison ivy. Get that itchiness on your skin. The compounds and oats are known to reduce that. Oh so that's why that you know they're known for that And then there's a couple of other compounds called avino kocides that Together with the of the ninian through reminds and the venacuro sides. Which are i mean. Both of them are really hard to say. Yes but these are just polyphenol compounds They've also been shown to prevent colon cancer And also heart disease because they help to reduce the the production of nitric oxide in the artery and And also help with the smooth muscle in the artery. So they're they've been studied widely for this now.

Diabetes Evanston Oats Colon Cancer Heart Disease
Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

Science Vs

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

"Today. We're looking at whether it really is that bad for your health to be fat and a quick note about our words in this episode. A lot of people don't like the words overweight or obese. Some people prefer the term fat as a neutral way to describe a person's body like tall but not everyone is comfortable with using fat this way and meanwhile overweight and obese have specific definitions medicine. So we're going to end up using all these terms but we'll try to be careful about when and why we use them okay so in order to talk about this at all we've got to with the bmi the body mass index every stat. You've never heard about how many americans are overweight comes from this measure. Hundreds of thousands of studies rely on it. It's a staple of modern medicine. So where on earth did it come from to find out. We're going to go back to the nineteen fifties do the university of minnesota's football stadium. The golden gophers are battling it out in the big ten conference. Our story starts down in the depths of the stadium entered through gate twenty seven. Just as if you had a ticket gate twenty so and then there's a maze of of hallways and offices along under the sloping of the The bleachers above this is henry blackburn. He's taking us to the lab where the bmi was born. He's a professor emeritus and minnesota so When when we worked there on a saturday could hear a distant rumble. When the minnesota eighteen got a touchdown run out and run up the causeway and see if we could see the extra point kick sometimes invaded by berman. Because of all those who left the stands and the carter but it was our place. Were very much at home. There and one thing they were doing and as weird lab was trying to answer this big question. How much fat do we have in our bodies. This was important because scientists figured it was the first step and understanding whether fat is bad for us

Golden Gophers Henry Blackburn University Of Minnesota Minnesota Football Berman
Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

Ask The Health Expert

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

"Have been talking about burbank for years. Because i've been talking about kito for twenty years and i've been talking about burberry for probably about half as long. It's one of the most houghton's anti-aging anti-diabetic key tone insulin sensitivity improving if improves amp k. Protects you from advanced location and products and glorification which is blood sugar damage. This is such a powerful compound. As is it's kind of drug equivalent metformin in so anyone associated with having diabetes or insulin resistance definitely as interested in metformin or the herbal equivalent of covering but certainly people that are into anti aging and looking to lower information with crp. Lower hemoglobin a. One c the blood sugar and live longer are taking things like verb ring. Or now the new form that i was involved in patents of kodi hydro bordering. So what's cool about die. Hydra ring is it's about five to ten times more bioavailable so it increases much more in the plasma at a much lower dose you only have to take about one hundred milligrams versus five hundred milligrams of burberry and also what's really cool is it lasts about twice as long in the plasma versus standard burglary so standard burberry. And you're taking five hundred milligrams three times a day and with diana jabbering you're taking around one hundred milligrams two times a

Kito Burberry Burbank Houghton Insulin Resistance Diabetes Diana
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

"Welcome to nutrition facts. I'm your host. Dr michael gregor today. We look at ways to mitigate a serious mental health disorder. Depression there's accumulating evidence in brain derived neurotrophic fact may be playing a role in human depression beady. Nf controls the growth of new nerve cells so low levels may explain the atrophy of specific brain areas. You see among depressed patients that maybe one of the reasons exercises so good for our brains. Starting our day exercise regimen within three months you can get a quadrupling obedient. F- reliefs from your brain. This makes sense. I mean anytime. We were desperate to catch prey or desperate not to become prey ourselves. We needed to be cognitively sharp. And so when we're fasting or exercising or an negative calorie balance. Our brain starts churning out. Bvd nf to make sure we're firing on all cylinders. So of course. Big farm as eager to create drugs to mimic this effect. But is there any way to boost enough naturally. Yes i just said it. Fasting and exercise. Okay okay but is there anything we can add to our diet to boost obedient. Well hiring takes dietary flavonoids appear to be protectively associated with symptoms of depression. The harvard nurses study followed tens of thousands of women for years and found that those who are eating the most to appeared to reduce the risk of coming down with depression. Flavonoids occur naturally implants. So there's a statue mountain variety of healthy foods. But how do we know. The benefits are from the flavonoids and not just from eating healthier in general. You don't know until you put it to the test. See some fruits and vegetables have more than others. Apples have more than apricots plums. More than peaches red cabbage. More than white kale. More than cucumbers. So if you randomize people into one of three groups more high flavonoids fruits and vegetables. More low flavonoids fruits and vegetables or no extra fruits and vegetables at all after eighteen weeks. Only the high flavonoids group got a significant boost and obedient f- levels which corresponded to an improvement in cognitive

Dr Michael Gregor Depression Harvard
Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Food Heaven Podcast

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

"To the podcast. Sabrina thank you on so excited to have you so tell us about how you started to explore issues of body image and wait specifically for women of color while this is actually almost like a family legacy for me. My grandmother was born in rural georgia during the late nineteen thirties and so she was growing up the jim crow era and lived in a racially segregated community as part of the great migration in nineteen sixty. She traveled west and at that time for the first time in her life she lived and worked around white women and she was amazed by the number of white women diets. Seems like what is this. You know sort of like a typical black grandmother fashioned. By the time. I came of age in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s. When i was in high school she was still troubling over. This question like what is going on here. She would even ask me like why women dying to be thin. And i was like sixteen years old but it wasn't until about ten years later when i was working in a predominantly black community in san francisco baby hunters points. I met women of color who were hiv positive. And we're attaining an hiv medication adherence clinic where i was a researcher who refuse to take their medications for fear of gaining weight. And i thought oh. Wow you know this. What was clearly a phenomenon that was mostly about middle class white women in the nineteen sixties arguably even through the ninety s. Clearly by the early dots was something. That was impacting women of color as well so i wanted to be able to dig further into this question of why is it so important for women of all racial ethnic backgrounds at this point to feel like they need to discipline themselves and maintain a particular. Wait

Sabrina Georgia San Francisco
Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

"We're going to look at. How dieting and disordered eating are similar. We're gonna look at what disordered eating looks like. And then we're also going to talk about what you can do to heal from disordered eating how you can start to take action if this is something that you struggle with. So we'll start by talking about what disordered eating actually is. And then i'll share with you. How dieting is very similar to disordered eating so when we look at the definition of disordered. Eating it's really used to describe a range of irregular eating behaviors. And it's important to know that this is just a description. It is not a diagnosis. So disordered eating is not a diagnosis. But it doesn't mean that it's not a valid struggle which will talk about a little bit. Everyone who struggles with an eating disorder has disordered eating. But not everyone who has disordered eating struggle with an eating disorder. So i think that's a really important distinction here An eating disorder must fit a very specific narrow criteria in order to be diagnosed and disordered. Eating doesn't have to fit that particular narrow definition And also it's not a diagnosis. But here's the thing. I really don't want you to get caught up in the fact that there is no official diagnosis for disordered eating. Because that doesn't mean that your struggles aren't real. It doesn't mean that they aren't valid. You do not need a diagnosis in order to get support in order to ask for help in order to know that what you are going through is really