Nutrition

Hear the inside skinny with the latest audio on nutrition, how to eat well and maintain a healthy diet and weight, from audio aired on premium podcasts.

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

Audioburst Playlists

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

"Welcome to Audioburst’s Nutrition playlist. You’ll hear bite-sized audio highlights from the latest podcasts and talk radio shows on eating well and maintaining a healthy diet. Bon appetit!

A highlight from How CoQ10 Supports Heart Health, Prevents Migraines, And Improves Cognition

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:02 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How CoQ10 Supports Heart Health, Prevents Migraines, And Improves Cognition

"Now, when you get older, your compute ten production declines, it declines with other things like stress, chronic stress, toxins, zebra medications like statins, and when you have lower levels of cooked you can, it leaves this lower level of energy that we experience as we get older, but it also leads to some serious diseases. Now, it's kind of a cool thing. It was discovered, as I said, in the 50s and 1957, scientists didn't really catch on to it for a number of decades, but in 1978, the Nobel Prize was awarded in chemistry to the scientists who understood how mitochondria make use of CoQ10 to make energy. And then the science is exploded on CoQ10. Now one of the benefits of cooking pan. Why should we care what should we do? Well, it has a lot of benefits. Specifically for the fact that it's so key to making energy, which is key to everything else in their body. It's also a great antioxidant and helps deal with free radicals that can damage ourselves. Now, when you see COVID ten in the research, you see low levels linked to all sorts of age related diseases, whether it's dementia, Parkinson's, degenerative diseases, but the good news is that you can increase cocoa and your diet and it's good for you, but I'm going to explain to you how it works, why it's important and some of the amazing research that we now know about CoQ10 kind of implore us to be way more cognizant of how much we're getting, even we can even measure and I do this in my practice measure country ten levels. I see lots of people with low co detail almost. And yet the foods that increase CoQ10 reduce the reasons and exposures to things that cause us to reduce CoQ10 production like the stressors and bad diet and all the normal stuff we talked about toxins allergens microbes, stress, all that that actually cause injury to the mitochondria and damage to our energy production. But it can do so many things. One of the areas where it's so great is heart health. In fact, there's a whole field of metabolic cardiology, which is, how do we rejuvenate weak hearts? Congestive heart failure is really common. And it's a debilitating disease. The average life expectancy once you get at about 5 years, which is like cancer, most people don't realize that. But, you know, in the heart muscle is and the brain are the highest concentrations of mitochondria. And so it's no surprise that CoQ10 plays a huge role in heart function. And one study about 420 people with heart failure, where the heart's not pumping, the muscle isn't working because of lack of energy. If they were given coenzyme Q ten, they had improved symptoms and they had a lower risk of dying from heart related issues. Another study treated about 600 patients with CoQ10 or placebo and found that the group that got the CoQ10 was in the hospital less and had fewer complications than the placebo group and did better overall in their heart function. It's also important in the brain. And migraines, it's something I use regularly for migraines regularly for heart patients. By the way, everybody with a statin, which I don't prescribe that often, but it can be useful sometimes. Definitely gets cooked you can. But it's great for migraines. Not all migraines, but there are certain migraines because there's not such thing as a migraine. There are many, many different types of migraines, and maybe caused by gluten or hormones or the microbiome or by the candle issues or compute issues. And so there's a lot of reasons for migraines, even though they all manifest as the same symptom. And functional medicine we say, just because you know the name of the disease, it doesn't mean you know what's wrong with you. You know, the name of the disease is just the name we give to people who share a set of symptoms, but the causes may be different for different people. And sometimes it is a CoQ10 deficiency that's been linked to migraines because bad mitochondria function can lead to more inflammation, oxidative stress and India. And that actually can result in these headaches. So when you actually take a ten, you get better mitochondrial function, lower inflammation, and researchers in one study found that high quality cookie ten supplements, three times, were three times more likely to reduce migraines than a placebo. Another study of about 1500 patients found they had fewer and less severe headaches after they began taking CoQ10. So it's something you have to figure out why are you even migrating in the first place, but it can be a great adjunct. It also helps blood sugar control and since about 93% of us are metabolically unhealthy and if some degree now of insulin dysregulation and pre diabetes, we see that it really helps with improving insulin sensitivity and blood sugar and that's great because we are seeing just such a burden of this and something we can do to actually mitigate that is to take a little CoQ10. And may even prevent diabetes by reducing the number of fat cells that accumulate in the body that lead to more obesity and diabetes and is an energy problem. Also, it's been shown to help slow down or stay off reverse Alzheimer's. Mitochondria are the main energy source of your cells, especially brain cells, and when your mitochondria are not functioning, it can kill the brain cells or make them not work well.

Migraines Parkinson's Congestive Heart Failure Nobel Prize Heart Patients Dementia Cancer Headaches Diabetes India Alzheimer's Obesity
A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Great Skin

Ask The Health Expert

01:00 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Great Skin

"Skin that ages faster than it should is no fun. And best yet, though, it's preventable. There are things we can do to prevent or slow down the signs of aging skin. So let me ask this. We all know it's normal to see changes in our skin as we age. But why is that normal? Now, first of all, we're all going to deal with some level of oxidative stress. And this is something that can age us faster if we have too much of it. Now I'm going to give you some examples, but first, let me explain this process. Oxidative stress happens when there's an imbalance of free radicals and antioxidants in your body. And too many free radicals do damage. So unless your body is able to maintain a balance between the antioxidants and free radicals, the way it works is that your cells produce free radicals during normal metabolic processes, but your cells also produce antioxidants in those antioxidants. They neutralize the free radicals.

A highlight from Industry Bias: How Big Sugar Manipulates the Science

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

05:52 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Industry Bias: How Big Sugar Manipulates the Science

"That was a lie, forcing the journal to publish a corrected version after The Associated Press obtained emails showing the industry front group requested revisions. It also came out that a co author conveniently forgot to mention a 25 grand grant she got directly from Coca-Cola. You know it's bad when candy bar companies criticize an industry funded paper on sugar. The makers of Snickers, skittles, and M and ms broke ranks with other food companies and denounced the industry funded paper. They themselves were a member of the ISI, but come on, telling people to ignore guidelines to cut down on sugar, that's just making us all look bad. If you look at the relationship between funding source and the conclusions in nutrition related scientific articles, there's like 7 or 8 times the odds of the conclusion will skew favorably compared to studies with no industry funding. For interventional studies, the proportion of studies paid for by industry that reached unfavorable conclusions about their own products was a big fat 0%, which should not surprise anyone. So what can journals do to counteract the tactics that industry often uses to advocate for the safety of unsafe products or question the integrity of science that calls their products into question? To combat the tobacco industries influence over scientific discourse, leading journal editors have refused to be passive conduits for articles funded by the tobacco industry, they just won't accept tobacco industry funded studies period. Accordingly, high quality journals could refrain from publishing studies on the health effects of added sugars funded by soda and cookie companies. But they're not. This was published in the annals of internal medicine. And so, four years later, with the next batch of dietary guidelines on the way, and the last scientific report of the guidelines committee encouraging people to eat diets, not just lower in sugar, but lower in meat as well. Big beef decided to follow in the footsteps of big Butterfinger. Same journal, same guy, same scientist for higher Bradley Johnston as lead author, and the rest is history. We'll dig into exactly how he pulled it off next. In 2016, Washington based lobby group published a scientific review which concluded that evidence in favor of guidelines recommending limits on added dietary sugar was low quality and did not meet criteria for trustworthy recommendations. This was a group funded by multinational food and agrochemical companies from Coke to Monsanto to the captains of corn syrup. Accused of hijacking the scientific process in a disingenuous way to sow doubt and jeopardize public health. But exactly how did they get away with it? Here's their paper. Questioning the scientific basis of guideline recommendations on sugar intake. Using the grade approach. They concluded that the overall quality of evidence to support such recommendations was low to very low. Grade stands for the grading of recommendations assessment development and evaluation initiative, which was developed to make clinical guidelines more evidence based and thank heavens for that. Clinical guidelines are like which drug to give to whom used to be developed by like the gob set method, just some good old boys sitting round a table. Under grade, high quality evidence appears to be derived exclusively from randomized trials. This is not surprising, given that the grade process was designed for drugs. And of course, you want your drugs put to the test. Like, remember the premarin story where for a decade, organizations recommended that clinicians encourage postmenopausal women to use hormone replacement therapy because women who are taking it appear to have fewer heart attacks. But when put to the test, randomized controlled trials instead showed the opposite. So we definitely want drugs put through randomized double blind placebo controlled trials where people are randomized to take the drug or annoyingly take a placebo instead and no one knows who's and which group until the code is broken at the end and you see how well the two groups did compared to each other. Everyone agrees that randomized controlled trials are enormously valuable in many areas of medical research such as the testing of drugs, but wait a second. How do you do that with diet? I mean, there's no such thing as a placebo diet. How can you randomize people to different diets, but somehow hide from them, which diets they're following. People tend to notice what they put into their own mouths. In RCTs, randomized controlled trials are so expensive. They typically last for only weeks or months, but it takes most cancers decades to develop. So as nearly impossible to see if different diets prevent or cause cancer that way. To see if smoking causes cancer, you can follow large cohorts of smokers and non smokers out for decades to see who gets cancer and who doesn't, but it's not like you can randomize people to smoke or not smoke for decades, when studying lifestyle interventions, you often just can't do randomized controlled trials, and even if you could, it might not be ethical. Take crib death, for example, sudden infant death syndrome, a pivotal study studying the habits of infants who died, discovered that sleeping on their stomachs was a risk factor. So we started educating parents face up to wake up, and the Sid's rates dropped. What more do we need?

Industry Front Group Same Journal Bradley Johnston Washington Based Lobby Group Coca ISI The Associated Press Cola The Journal Monsanto Coke Heart Attacks Cancer Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
A highlight from The Power Of Finding A Purpose Bigger Than Yourself with Lynne Twist

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:00 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Power Of Finding A Purpose Bigger Than Yourself with Lynne Twist

"Your life is about, how to have meaning how to be happy, how to live a life, it's fulfilled. This is going to be a very important conversation because it's with an extraordinary woman. Sometimes I've known for many years, lyn twist. She's the founder of the soul of money institute and she's the author of the bestselling award winning book called the soul of money, transforming your relationship with money and life. And over the last 40 years, she's had almost a storybook life from the looks of it. She's worked over a 100,000 people in 50 countries in doing all sorts of amazing things looking at how we can live with integrity through conscious philanthropy, strategic visioning, and having a healthy relationship with money. Her clients have ranged from Procter & Gamble and Microsoft and the international unity church, Charles swab, United way, the black theater of Harlem, at Harvard University, and many more you'd be surprised to hear, including working with groups like the united nation Beijing's women's conference, the state of the world forum synthesis dialog with this holiness a Dalai Lama, the governor's conference on California women and lots of other things. She's a visionary leader. She's been adviser to the Desmond Tutu foundation, the Nobel women's initiative, and the recipient of many, many awards. She's the cofounder also of the pachamama alliance, a nonprofit whose mission is to empower the indigenous peoples of the Amazon, rainforests, to preserve their lands and their culture, she's served on a number of nonprofit boards. And she's gone from working with Mother Teresa and Calcutta to refugee camps in Ethiopia. To the threatened rainforest of Amazon and being on the ground and getting her hands dirty and being in the real thick of it has brought Lynn a deep sense of understanding of the social Tapestry of the world and historical landscape of the times we're living in. And her new book, a living a committed life finding freedom and fulfillment in a purpose larger than yourself is out. And if you want to learn how to be really fulfilled and happy, I think the first thing you need to do is go get this book. So welcome link. Thank you. Wow, that's maybe tired listening to us. I know, right? I think it would be like, did we do this? Well, you've had a pretty amazing life. I mean, from working with Microsoft to the indigenous peoples of the Amazon to the Dalai Lama, the Desmond Tutu. I mean, it's pretty pretty amazing. And where you've been and what you've seen and I think most of us live lives that somehow our grasping for more. And knowing there's more longing for more wanting more, craving more. And not knowing quite how to get there. And, you know, I really found that in my own life. And I think the more that I do this, the happier I am, the more that I serve, the more that I get, the more that I don't just think about myself and what I want and what I need, the happier I am. I remember just a quick story to kind of illustrate a little bit about what you're talking about in your book was I went to Haiti after the earthquake and it was just a scene of absolute devastation with 300,000 people killed, 300,000 people wounded. We were the first medical team in the hospital in the main hospital in Port-au-Prince. And it was just a scene of utter devastation and suffering. And I worked 20 hours a day, barely 8. Just, you know, it was so grueling. But I don't remember time when I felt more fulfilled. I wouldn't say happy, but in a sense, I was kind of full of happiness and joy in a weird way, being in that situation. It's hard to describe. It's a paradox, but the more I helped others, the more I felt better. And I think there's a quote in the book from Howard thorough this is don't ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and go do that because what the world needs is people who have come alive. And so tell us from that context. What does it mean to have a purpose larger than yourself? Well, I think we get a little bit bamboozled by this wanting more of everything more and more and more and more and more. We kind of translate that into consumerism. When what we want is more fulfillment in our heart and soul and it just doesn't get filled up by more stuff or having a bigger house or making more money or trying to raise your status, even though that's kind of what the culture we live in points us toward. But what we actually, you know, Howard Thurman's quote is so great because really what we want is we want our hearts to sing. We want to feel great about ourselves. We want to be filled with joy and that comes from making a big difference with your life. It comes from living the way you live. I mean, it comes from realizing like when you were in Haiti, that this opportunity of the life we've been given, that if you think about life as given to you, like a gift you received, then you want to give that life as a gift to something that's bigger than yourself. And when we do that, that it's so amazing because we think that sacrificial and giving things up, it's kind of the opposite. I found that when you make a commitment that's larger than your own life, it gets you out of this life starring me. And the life starring me is never fulfilling because you're always worried about am I too young or too old or too fat or too pretty enough or my smart enough. A life starring me is all about measuring up or trying to fit in. But when you realize that you can dedicate your life to something larger than yourself, something you probably can't even accomplish in your own lifetime. It starts to shape you into the person you need to be to fulfill that. And so an ordinary person, you know, people ask me

Soul Of Money Institute International Unity Church Charles Swab Black Theater Of Harlem Desmond Tutu Foundation Pachamama Alliance Amazon Dalai Lama LYN United Nation Procter & Gamble Microsoft Harvard University Mother Teresa Calcutta Desmond Tutu Beijing Ethiopia Lynn Haiti
A highlight from Increasing Your Brain Span with Bryce Wylde

Ask The Health Expert

02:46 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Increasing Your Brain Span with Bryce Wylde

"Doctor Bryce Wilde, I thought you'd been a regular on the show, which clearly we will need to make you be a regular on the show. But I was compelled to have you on with the title, the subtitle of your latest book, what have you done for your brain today? That's so cool. Thank you. Thanks so much. Well, you know, we often get forgotten about here in Canada. This is where I am based in Toronto, Canada, born and raised in the dual citizen. And we've got a really pretty good healthcare system here, which I'm proud of. When it works and we've been our functional medicine gurus. So we're keeping up. We're keeping up with the Joneses here in Canada, I think, yeah. Well, I think healthcare should start at home. That's my own opinion. And I know a lot of the stuff that you do really helps people take this stuff home. But why did you decide to focus on the brain? It was actually a major impetus was my own mom. And my father in law, so back in 2017, they were duly diagnosed with Alzheimer's, wasn't in the family. I had no idea really much. I mean, as a clinician myself, about the stages. Yeah. Yeah. And pretty much the same stage. You know, my mother was an education all her life. And my father in law, pretty smart guy in engineering. And they can dupe you, you know, an intelligent well most folks, you know, when they have this diagnosis or are known to fool the average individual, especially close family and friends when they don't want to admit there's something wrong. I don't know if you've seen the movie beautiful mind Russell Crowe, there's a scene where he enters in the cabin, where his wife is really not privy to and it's like, you know, area of refuge and experimentation. And there's all these notes hanging from the ceiling and the wall and you get this impression of, you know, obviously psychotic break schizophrenia was his issue. So one day I had been my mom's condo for months. I'd pick her up regularly, bring her over to the house and you'd have dinner. I'd bring her back or Uber back. And I walked into her condo, and there were notes everywhere. Very similar to that I've seen in beautiful mind. And one of my first read was my sisters, whose name is Tanya. It's built with a Y and it was spelled with an I and it was a DOB or date of birth or the question mark on it. And I thought to myself, wow, yeah. So that was the first awakening I had if something was going down with my mom, had her tested and assessed, and she was already well into stage two of Alzheimer's.

Bryce Wilde Canada Alzheimer's Toronto Russell Crowe Schizophrenia Tanya
A highlight from How To Reduce Your Toxic Burden And Prevent Exposure

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:31 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from How To Reduce Your Toxic Burden And Prevent Exposure

"With Harriet Washington on the specific challenges, minority populations face in terms of lead, pesticides and other toxic exposures, and with Maggie ward and the functional medicine approach to identifying toxins that are contributing to illness. Let's jump in. There is definitely some easy practical tips that we can do to help ourselves. I think the first one is eat real clean, sustainable, sustainably grown food. You know, this is the basic building block of the body for improving biologic resilience. And if you're eating whole foods that are grown in a clean sustainable way, you're getting a lot of the way there. It means that you're getting the micronutrients that are going to help your body process these chemicals. It means that you're getting the different plant chemicals that are going to up regulate our antioxidant defenses in our anti inflammatory pathways. It means that we're going to be avoiding pesticide exposure, which is an obesity. It means that we're not buying things that come in plastic. So just by eating fresh whole clean, sustainably grown food, you're hitting a lot of the different boxes with the obese agen problem. Within whole foods, there are some that are extra special. So of course, cruciferous vegetables, which are going to have the sulforaphane that activates our antioxidant defense system. So this is the cauliflower broccoli kale bok choy cabbage. Sauerkraut, these things that are directly going to change gene expression to protect us from some of these obesogenic chemicals. Then of course it's like what your food stored in. So we want to avoid plastic storage as much as we can and really try and opt for glass and other materials. And now it's so easy to find this stuff. You can go on Amazon, you get glass Tupperware, glass water bottles, aluminum, or ceramic, things like this. And again, it's not just about BPA. I think that's a little bit of a, we often now look for BPA free plastics, but plastics contain as many as 15 endocrine disrupting chemicals. So BPA is just one and it's great that it doesn't have that, but there's other things like BPF and BPS and these other chemicals that we know are endocrine disruptors. So be the weirdo who brings the bamboo fork and knife in your purse to the takeout restaurant, get be the person who always has the glass water bottle and who has the brings your own storage containers because these things actually do add up and make a difference. The weird story that is really important be the weirdo. Be the weirdo. And give these things as gifts. I have a running Google Doc of gift ideas and a lot of them are becoming basically these types of things. Like give people the portable reusable wood cutlery, you know, and things like this that they might not think about, but they can really help their health. I am someone who loves personal care products. I love cosmetics and all this stuff. And so this one has been really important to me figuring out how to basically reduce the toxin toxins and toxic load of all these products I'm using. And so I think this is a really low hanging fruit. So basically, look at your bathroom, look at your shampoos conditioners, lotions, makeup, deodorant, toothpaste, and probably throw out most of what's in there and look for the brands that have very few ingredients that are ingredients that you recognize and know, and that are approved ideally by the environmental working group website, which has a basically a registry of all personal care products. And you can just walk through the store and search things on your phone and find out what is least likely to be toxic.

Harriet Washington Maggie Ward Obesity Amazon Google Environmental Working Group
A highlight from #301: How Low-Level Restriction Saps Your Energy

Food Psych

00:46 sec | 5 d ago

A highlight from #301: How Low-Level Restriction Saps Your Energy

"Your energy. I'll explain how even if you think you're eating, quote unquote, plenty of calories. You might still be taking in too little energy and what you can do about it. Before I answer just a few quick announcements, this episode of food site is brought to you by my intuitive eating fundamentals online course. The course is an incredibly deep dive into intuitive eating with dozens of hours of content helping you work through the ten principles of intuitive eating, troubleshoot common sticking points, and finally get to a place of peace with food. Of course now has a new home on a new platform that's easy to use on any device and a huge library of q-and-as from me and my team to help answer all the frequently and not so frequently asked questions that come up in the process of relearning intuitive eating.

A highlight from Bitesize: Weight Loss 101

Food for Thought

07:26 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Bitesize: Weight Loss 101

"In each of these episodes, we have incredible guests who are at the forefront of their fields who will be giving us the trusted advice. That's what we all need and answering your burning questions, which let's be honest in nutrition, the questions seem to be never ending these days. Now, this series combines some of the many highlights over the years and I hope will continue to support your nutrition and well-being. Dieting is often unsustainable and I think this is something we see in the traditional clinic all the time. One analysis, for instance, a 14 popular diet programs found that weight loss was mostly reversed after 12 months. So any results or go on a year down the line. And there are so many weight loss plans out there to choose from. And all too many of us choosing them and trying them out. But what I want you to know is that we don't all respond to one size fits all diet in the same way. That's half the problem. It's not you being a failure. It's the fact that diets are failing you. So this final bite sized episode of food for thought had to be a weight loss one O one. What better way than to make sure that we arm you all with the advice that you need to know about weight loss and the sustainable measures to achieve it? Let's start this episode with a conversation with doctor Joshua woolwich, who's ethos really is about escaping diet traps. I think it's such an important conversation that we have here that we've selected for this episode from privilege. What to do for losing weight, health and psychology, the impact on us, of course, in both of those areas. Our BMI should we even be taking that seriously now BMI as a calculation, there's lots of putting in versus taking out type of discussion here. So enjoy. It's always finding things to avoid, right? That tends to be that tends to be the go to, doesn't it? It's what is not going to work for me. What am I in quote intolerant to? What am I what should I be avoiding because it's bad in quotes for me? Rather than just let's focus on the good stuff. But let's be honest, the reason why we do that is because if we're talking about taking out, it makes us feel more safe and more secure because taking out everything around food is also wrapped up in our desire to be thin and what we look like. So taking out feels safer than adding in. Because we've spent so much of our life the vast majority of us trying to remove what we eat, or what we want to eat because we're concerned about that, making us put on weight. And so in thinking about including changing our mindset to what can we put in, can feel really scary because that is wrapped up in this fear of but if I add stuff in, I'm going to be eating in quotes too much and then I'm going to put wait on and it's just much safer for me to stay what I'm doing and take it out instead because then I've best of both worlds. If you're somebody who has been exposed to weight stigma, if you're someone that's been exposed to being told that you're too fat and you need to lose weight, if that's something that has happened in your life, everything starts getting wrapped up in all of your decisions start getting wrapped up in that. And that continues to get propagated by the medical profession as well. And it is a big issue. I think it was something that I realized going to university to study nutrition. What's the appearances and aesthetics for me? It was life-changing. I have nothing to do with your health. And it's one of the first things we're taught because obviously you can be underweight, a healthy weight and still not be ideally healthy. It doesn't matter how you look. It's what's going on. Obviously on the inside and what you've said is right, and we see it in clinic again and again and again, the psychology and nutrition that's interwoven together arrive and it's incredibly important to make behavior changes or to let go. You have to be able to let go of these inbuilt rules and ways that we've seen the world. It's like unlearning that's the way I used to describe it. I'm learning everything you thought you knew and starting again and one of the biggest things that we always found in the clinic. This is from the very early days before I even had a team at Patricia. It was just myself. I was that BMI was incredibly confusing for my clients. And I think it's still still in the same position now. What are your thoughts on using obviously because you come from the medical side of things as well? BMI in terms of health today. Incredibly problematic. I'm not surprised that still confusing for people because nothing's changed. I mean, it's the same. It's the same simplistic equation to give you a number that doesn't really mean anything. Like it literally doesn't mean anything. It is a number based on your height and weight. That means nothing. It's just a number. And we have assigned meaning to it because as humans and as a society and asthmatics, we like, we like brackets, we like kind of black and white thinking. We like putting things into sections and putting things into categories. And so we kind of we want to do that in terms of, well, here's a number we can determine. Okay, good. Well, now I can use this number and decide whether or not I need to exercise more. But it's really harmful. Your health is not defined by that number. In any way, shape or form. And even just add a simplistic note, you can tell that based on the fact that there are strict cutoffs between these supposed categories. And so if you, if you put on half a kilogram, your suddenly unhealthy the next day. That's clearly nonsense, like that's just not how that works. And yet we are still very strict with these cutoffs. BMI as at a population level can be useful. And what I mean by that is when you, because there are so many flaws to it, when you then take an overall measure of millions of people in a population. Those flaws kind of even out. And so some of those discrepancies can kind of get lost. And so as a population level, as a statistic, it can be useful for certain things. But at an individual level, it's useless. Like and it's super lazy. We have even in a very weight centric environment of going through medical school, we learn an awful different number of ways of assessing somebody's health. And BMI has never the be all and end all of that in any way, shape or form. And if we remove BMI entirely from our assessment, we can still just as easily work out and assess somebody's health. And I would argue that we should be because it actually confuses matters because it gives us a bias because BMI is probably one of the first things. And so if we're, let's say someone's BMI is 27, which ironically statistically at a population level is supposedly the healthiest BMI, even though it's in the overweight category, we have a BMI of 27 and that's the first thing that you see on a screen at a doctor's office, and you go, okay, well, automatically, before you assess anything else, it's labeled as overweight and therefore unhealthy.

Joshua Woolwich Patricia
A highlight from How To Maintain Healthy Joints

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:34 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from How To Maintain Healthy Joints

"I have a master's in holistic health. And co hosting with me today is Melanie Beasley. Melanie is a licensed and registered dietitian. She sees clients virtually and in person at our Egan office. And Mel teaches a lot of our classes. You may have been fortunate enough to see mal teaching some of our pre recorded online classes. And she's just a wonderful counselor and educator. So it's really great to be here with you today, Mel. Wow, thanks, Cara. You know, when I'm meeting with clients, I would say nearly half of them are suffering from arthritis, joint pain, or stiffness. Like you said, there is a big range in how bad the pain can be. For some, their stiff just getting out of bed in the morning. That's no fun, but then others experience things like chronic pain and that consumes their day. The CDC, which is the Centers for Disease Control, states that one in four people have some form of arthritis. Now, think about that. That's pain for one in four people. And that seems like it's on the rise from what I saw in clinic just even ten years ago. Oh, I'm sure. I'm sure it is on the rise. 70% of older adults say they experience joint pain. And women are a bit more likely than men to report having joint pain. I learned a lot when preparing for today's show. And one really interesting thing that I read is joint pain is the leading cause of disability in the workplace. Joint pain just kind of think about that. Out of all the different reasons that people take short or long-term disability and they're unable to work, it's because of issues with their joints. And trying to work with pain is no fun. I mean, there's a lot of people that are white knuckling it through their work day because they're in pain. When my clients come to see me, and they have been dealing with hip pain or knee pain for years, they think it's just a part of getting older and aging. Like my mom had it, my grandma had it. And they both had all the same issues that I have. Well, they're often surprised when I tell them that joint breakdown is not a normal part of aging. Even if there is that genetic piece that runs in the family, that's usually not the risk factor. That's only 10% of your risk factor. So there's a lot more that goes into play with the breakdown of joints, and that's what we're going to talk about today, right, Cara. We are. And we're going to give steps to that you can take to help with your joints. Again, no matter what your age is. Ideally, people would be starting to think about their future joint health years before they ever first experienced stiffness or pain. Arthritis and joint pain and joint breakdown, they don't happen overnight. So by the time someone is actually experiencing pain, it's likely the joints have started breaking down years prior, maybe even decades. Yes, I always think of it as when your body has inflammation, and by the time you get a symptom, your body can not handle that inflammation anymore, and it's it's flare gun. And once that flare gun goes off and you're having that pain, boy, something's been going on for quite a while, like you said. Well, Cara wouldn't it be great if teenagers and folks in their 20s and 30s had a proactive plan to prevent joint issues down the road. Although join issues are most common for people age 50 and older, it starting to happen more and more to those in their 30s and 40s. I have a lot of friends and family members who have gone in for major surgeries like knee replacements, hip replacements, and even shoulder replacements. And like you mentioned earlier, this is the most common reason people are out of work or on disability is due to these darn joint issues, and then all the recovery time you need to take after a big surgery. 1 million hip and knee replacement surgeries are done in the U.S. every year. Gosh, it's a lot. I read a study showing that the rate of hip and knee replacement surgeries is due to increase to 3.5 million by the year 2025. So what's happening that we're breaking down our joints? And what can we do? Yeah. I mean, that's three times 300% in three years is the future estimation. And when we say it, it sounds so benign to say a hip replacement, right? But the journey to get to the place where you need that replacement is a painful one. It really is, yeah. I see that firsthand. In fact, I have my best friend's husband who is early 50s. He just last year had a hip replacement. Major surgery out of work. Obviously disability. And I just found out, you know, this time of year, we're doing our show towards the end of the year here, November, December time frame. So a lot of people have met 30 deductibles. They're having surgeries. I just found out he is about to have a total knee replacement. And had that hip replacement a year ago. So young, you know, it's happening younger and younger folks. It is. I had a client and her son has had degenerative discs in his back. And he's 22 years old.

Melanie Beasley Egan Office Cara MEL Arthritis Melanie Centers For Disease Control CDC U.S.
A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Liver Health

Ask The Health Expert

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from What to Eat When to Eat and Why for Liver Health

"Hey, this is JJ virgin. Thanks so much for joining me. This is ask the health expert. In each episode, I put the power of health in your hands and share ways to get healthy, lose weight, heal your gut detox and lots more so you can look and feel better fast. If you'd rather watch the video, hey, I did put on my makeup and do my hair, so check it out on my YouTube channel. How do you feel about your liver? You don't even think about it, do you? Nope. Our livers don't get enough love. Let's face it. And I mean, they are amazing. They digest our food. They store energy. They clean our blood and fight infection. And if you drink wine, thank your liver. But if your liver is neglected, that's not good. Things can go wrong in a hurry, and you could end up dealing with a serious disease. In this video, I'm going to give you the Intel on what to eat. When to eat and why,

Jj Virgin Youtube Intel
A highlight from Nutrition Facts Grab Bag 25

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:34 min | Last week

A highlight from Nutrition Facts Grab Bag 25

"You may have heard the expression knowledge is power. Well, today we're going to give you more power to control your diet and lifestyle by giving you the facts. Welcome to the nutrition facts podcast. I'm your host. Doctor Michael greger. It's time for the nutrition facts grab bag where we look at the science on a wide variety of topics. Today we start with a pressing question. Why don't health insurers embrace plant based eating? Many of the diseases that cause a constant drain on healthcare budgets can be prevented by proper nutrition. So why aren't the big payers getting involved? I mean, even like a 1% decline in excess body fat cut alone, save tens of billions. You'd think at least the health insurance industry would try to get people to eat healthier to try to pay out less money. Well, one could see the insurance industry actually benefits from high healthcare costs because these rising costs are simply passed on to both individuals and employers in terms of higher premiums. And ensures take a fixed percentage of these premiums as increasing profits. They get a piece of the pie so the bigger the pie, the unhealthier everyone is, the bigger their piece. As such, ensures have not done as much as they could to help reduce healthcare costs because lower costs would hurt their bottom line. What if there was a medication that could successfully treat an even reverse heart disease, type two diabetes, high blood pressure,

Michael Greger Heart Disease Diabetes High Blood Pressure
A highlight from Is it Worse to Be Overfat or Under Lean? with Dr. Gabrielle Lyon

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:12 min | Last week

A highlight from Is it Worse to Be Overfat or Under Lean? with Dr. Gabrielle Lyon

"Coming up on this episode of the doctor's pharmacy. Those individuals that have a higher protein breakfast are much less likely to crave later on in the day and or go to the high satiety, highly palatable foods like you had mentioned for breakfast like the French toast and the donuts later on in the 3 o'clock afternoon when everyone is going for it. Hey everybody, it's doctor Mark. It's hard to overstate how important magnesium is for all aspects of our health. There's a long list of symptoms and diseases that can be treated or even cured with magnesium. It's my favorite mineral. In fact, way back when I was an ER Doc, magnesium was a critical element of our care. We used it to treat all sorts of things like arrhythmias, to constipation, to preeclampsia, even seizures. In pregnant women. So it's really essential to our health and well-being, and yet over 80% of the population doesn't get enough magnesium on a regular basis. And 45% are probably really deficient. Now, this is a problem because magnesium deficiency can increase your risk of all diseases and keep you from performing optimally, but even more critically, there's not just one type of magnesium. There are 7 different types that we need in our diet to ensure both our health and our mentality remain strong. I'm normally a big advocate of getting as many of your nutrients as you can through a well balanced diet.

Preeclampsia Mark Seizures
A highlight from Why Our Current Healthcare System Keeps Us Sick And How To Fix It

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Why Our Current Healthcare System Keeps Us Sick And How To Fix It

"Doctor Hyman speaks with doctor annad parikh on the challenge to get policymakers to appreciate prevention with former senator Bill frist on the importance of grassroots bipartisan efforts to generate change and with doctor Darius mazza farian on the need for government policies and why we can't solely rely on big food to change. Let's jump in. We all agree that prevention is important, but why has it not been that policymakers sort of elevated the why haven't they elevated this issue at the top? And I came up with a couple of reasons that would be happy to share. I think the first is it and you touched on this. A lot of policymakers are just reactive in general and prevention requires a proactive approach. And the reason they're reactive is whether you're in the executive branch or you're a member of Congress, they're oftentimes so many emergencies either real or imagined or crises or political controversies that oftentimes you spend a lot of time reacting. Putting out the fire. Yeah, absolutely. As opposed to thinking about proactive policies to improve health. And then prevention, oftentimes, takes time as well. So you have to have that patience and oftentimes the results are at least from a public health perspective, are often invisible when things are working. And health is being protected. And so I think the first reason is that the mindset of policy makers needs to shift from being reactive to proactive. I think the second reason is it could very well be that policymakers are just not as attuned to the evidence base, whether it's lifestyle medicine, whether it's prevention, whether it's a social determinant of health, understanding the evidence now that has been generated about the effects of all of these other modalities, I think is critical. And when you don't know the evidence, then you tend to think, well, that might be a slush fund. Those dollars in prevention might be a slush fund. And why should we support it? There are others then, as you said, who may think of prevention as you're right, part of the nanny state prevention is about individual responsibility and the government shouldn't be involved. So I think those are a couple of reasons. But then I think it goes beyond that. Prevention and public health, they require resources and right now in this country, if you look at our national health expenditure accounts, only about 3% of our dollars go to public health. Only about 5% go to primary and secondary prevention. And so even though we're in a tight fiscal climate, we're always going to be in tight fiscal climate. Finding opportunities through our discretionary budgets that are mandatory budgets, CBO doesn't always help with their tenure budget window in terms of scoring. So just to clarify for people, congressional budget offices, the watchdog. That's right. That looks over the cost of things for the government. The policies and laws. And policies based on their impact over a ten year period. But it's a benefits of prevention might be over a 20 year period. So it's like a cost center instead of a cost savings. Absolutely. Absolutely. And I think that's a very important point. And I think so there needs to be more focus on finding the will really, the political will to expand resources using our discretionary budget as well as our mandatory budgets and through Medicare and Medicaid because that's really how we scale things. So I think that's also critical point. I think doctor Hyman, another reason why policymakers haven't gravitated towards prevention is we have a $3.6 trillion healthcare system and frankly can't make a lot of money. You can't make as much money on prevention as you can on treatment. So the incentives there in the system are not as much there. Now value based from the government, from people running healthcare. Absolutely. Now, value based healthcare transformation with the focus on payment based on outcomes as opposed to volume should change that over time. But that's going to be a long haul. So just to clarify for people, the way typically doctors get paid in hospitals they paid is like widgets. The more stuff you do the more you get paid the more angioplasties you do, the more surgeries you do, the more colonoscopies you, the more visits you do, the more money you make. That's right. And it doesn't care if the product is good or not. It's like imagine paying for a car, but it didn't work. You're not paying for the outcome, and so value based care is a

Doctor Hyman Annad Parikh Senator Bill Frist Darius Mazza Farian Congress CBO Hyman Medicare
A highlight from #300: What to Do When Your Family Makes Diet-Culture Comments

Food Psych

02:39 min | Last week

A highlight from #300: What to Do When Your Family Makes Diet-Culture Comments

"Your book and podcast have been liberating from the life thief. My question is, how do I approach comments from family members that are diet culture ish? I'm trying to teach my daughter now 11 about body acceptance, but it's sometimes derailed by family and friends who have their own issues. Signed Stella concerned mama and recovering disordered eater slash exerciser. So thanks Stella for that great question. And before I answer, I'll just give my standard disclaimer that these answers and this podcast in general are for informational and educational purposes only aren't a substitute for individual medical or mental health advice. And don't constitute a provider patient relationship. Also, this is just my take as one dietician and journalist, and I hope you'll seek out other perspectives and consult your own inner compass as well. So having a family that makes diety comments is really so common and understandable, given that we all live in diet culture, right? So you're definitely not alone. I know many, many people who've gone through the same issue. And personally, for me, as a anti diet dietitian and journalist who has friends and family members who know what I do for a living and I've talked about my work with them. Unfortunately, that's stuff still comes up, right? Still in my life, the people who know what I do for a living will occasionally make these diet culture comments and I have to navigate it as just a human living in the world. And I myself was on the flip side of that, right? Like years ago, I actually made some comments, some diety comments to the friend who introduced me to the wait inclusive paradigm more than 12 years ago now. And so now here I am over a decade later as a major proponent of the anti diet approach. So I've been on both sides of this and I think I'm kind of living proof that people can evolve in their views. But it really does take time and often people just aren't going to be open to challenging their own internalized diet culture beliefs. I know I certainly wasn't when my friend first brought it up to me and it wasn't until a few years later when I started working with eating disorders and really took a hard look at my own history of eating disorders and disordered eating that I was really able to open up to anti diet concepts and dig into the science for myself. But my friend had planted that seed, right? Which made me more receptive when I finally did encounter that paradigm at a time when I was in strong recovery myself and really ready for those ideas. So right now, Stella, your family members might be really entrenched in their diet culture beliefs and closed off to other views, just like I was back then or so many of us probably have had that experience, right?

Stella
A highlight from [Beginnings & Breakthroughs] Training While Healing Injuries with Mekenna Smith

Ask The Health Expert

01:41 min | Last week

A highlight from [Beginnings & Breakthroughs] Training While Healing Injuries with Mekenna Smith

"All right, you may not know this about me, but I was on a show called freaky eaters on the learning channel on TLC for a couple of seasons. And that show lives on. I don't know, YouTube or somewhere every time I do Instagram or anything else. I get fans. It's pretty crazy. Anyway, I have a gal we're going to be talking to you today in beginnings and breakthroughs. Who found me on freaky eaters. She's in her 20s. But she found me and she decided to do something about her sugar addiction using the sugar impact diet. So we're going to unpack that. What she did that you can use for yourself. And then what we're doing now to help her set her up for a great long, healthy kick in life. So I will be right back with me up before I do that. Let me just tell you a little bit about McKenna who is at the university of Arizona. And yes, those are my dogs fighting in the background. Yes, they are. They are like my new puppy 6 months old is literally terrorizing my 15 months old. My 15 year old chihuahua. Anyway, super active gown McKenna. She is works at a ranch. She is a university student who is coming a therapist specializing in trauma and super active gal and really, really resilient and really focused and someone I think is going to go far in life. So it will be right

Youtube Mckenna Gown Mckenna University Of Arizona Chihuahua
A highlight from Bitesize: Better Brain Health

Food for Thought

07:00 min | Last week

A highlight from Bitesize: Better Brain Health

"Self belief here, lifestyle tips, kindness, the importance of deep breathing, how to really use social media and technology, I think, to our advantage, and of course asking for help. Sometimes day to day, the smallest things that we do, the daily things I guess, good or bad, however we want to describe it that have the biggest influence over us, don't let it doesn't have to be something catastrophic. Oh, absolutely. I mean, obviously catastrophically things can have an impact. But in terms of improving your mental health, sometimes we think it's a big thing that we do. Big overhauls in our life, but actually it's the small daily things, often tiny things that can improve our mental health that we really need to focus on. Yeah, completely. I guess I guess it's being kind to ourselves in a way because how do you even start acknowledging these watts and how's every day we feel and wise and changes that we should perhaps be navigating through because I think change can be one of the most terrifying things as a human being I said all the time in the clinic that we don't like change, do we as humans? Oh, absolutely. Our brains find change stressful, which is probably why the last year has been so stressful. And therefore, it goes along with its habitual ways, which are much easier and create less effort for your brain. So change can be overwhelmed and particularly big change. And I think you've tapped into something there about kindness, sometimes it's not necessarily behavior. Sometimes it is about how we speak to yourself or how we focus on ourselves, kindness has got lots of evidence or compassion has lots of evidence that it can improve mental health. I grew up with a focus of getting into the music industry. One of the biggest things that I think aided me at the time I didn't know was deep breathing because diaphragmatic breathing as a soprano is huge and I think that when we do that, do correct me if I'm wrong, we are Tapping into our parasympathetic nervous system by engaging in breathing because that's something everyone can do. Is that correct? That's absolutely correct. And it's actually a really, really efficient way to engage that system. What happens when our threat system is engaged, our breathing increases, our body's attempt to get more energy in, trying to get you going, trying to get more oxygen into kind of get all those body systems active and ready. And when I do think it's really quick and rapid, and what you need to do is really slow it down. And relax the system. And that is, I think we think of breathing as so simple and so easy that surely the simple thing can't actually have an effect. And I actually think as I call just have also been guilty of that, think, and I can't tell people to breathe, you know, what are they going to think about it? But the further one I've got in my career, the more I use that and I've seen how powerful it can be for people and it's also really good because it's something you can do at any point. You can set a bus and do it. You can do it in a cafe. You can do anywhere. It's not something people are going to even be aware you're doing. So it's really nice technique to use. How important would you say self belief is? Because if you struggle with confidence, I don't know how to phrase it. How can we, I don't know, bolster this in a positive way and get improvement there and perhaps self belief is something if we have better self belief, we can manage situations in a better way. Yeah, I think it depends what we mean by self belief because I think we often talk about self esteem and self esteem can be very achievement based. So I need to do this and then I will feel good about myself. But actually if we shift self belief to maybe self compassion and come back to that kindness, that's often a far easier thing to do rather than say I need to be kind of believe in myself all the time, actually none of us do do. We all have self doubts and that's all key. But if we shift it to C, I'm going to recognize itself doubt and distress of feeling bad at times are normal and that I can still be kind to myself and recognize that that's a common human trait and be compassionate to myself in the middle of it. That's a lot stronger kind of belief system than having to base their own achievement because we can't always achieve. We actually need to be kind and compassionate to ourselves when we don't achieve and when we make mistakes because that's normal. So I think maybe switching it from self belief to self compassion is a really positive thing. But obviously we do need to kind of see ourselves, which I think is also part of self compassion as equal to other humans. We're not worse than anybody else. We're not necessarily named jails. We're just all human. We've got this common humanity. We all make mistakes. We all mock up at times. We all get things wrong. None of us achieve and do our best all the time. It's not normal to do things well all the time. We all make mistakes, and we're all learning. And if we can start to see ourselves in that way rather than having to achieve or having to get things right, but we can start to believe that we are just as good as all other humans because we make mistakes because we get things wrong because we've experienced a stress, I think that's a lot more powerful than based on what we do or don't do if that makes sense. Do you have any suggestions on some really easy lifestyle tips that people can incorporate to feel better? I mean, I think you've just said to them, guess outside, move in your body and both have been shown to have really positive impacts on your well-being and mental health. And actually, because often when we're outside, we actually move our body anyway because we're moving through the environment, we're doing something. It doesn't have to be good to play a game of football or going to a game of tennis or whatever, just even getting outside and moving around looking at the horizon, looking at the trees, can be really beneficial for a well-being. So really interesting exercise, lots of benefits for a well-being for lots of different reasons. It releases chemicals, which makes us feel good. It actually manages that stress response and helps reduce it, and we just chemicals which help really set or reduce it. But also it helps our brain as well. Releases are going to growth hormone, which helps our brain thrive. So multiple mechanisms in which exercise are good for well-being. Yeah, oh, I completely agree, and I think something I guess reducing technology if it's something that spikes anxiety may be another useful one. It's a really hard, I think, mentioning technology at the moment isn't it because it's so much of our livelihoods can depend on it. Oh, absolutely. I think it is about us you see, not seeing technology as kind of black and white, good or bad. It's about how we use it, how we consume it, and note someone it starts to impact negatively on us. Now we're all becoming aware that social media is designed to capture your attention. It's driven

Watts Tennis Football
A highlight from Heartburn Prevention Plan

Dishing Up Nutrition

02:04 min | Last week

A highlight from Heartburn Prevention Plan

"Along with other uncomfortable symptoms, you're going to want to stay tuned today for your heartburn, perhaps you're taking one of the popular medications that's supposed to keep that heartburn at bay. But you are still having symptoms. Let me reassure you. If you have acid reflux, you are not alone because at least a third of people taking heartburn medication still have a burning sensation in their throat or their chest. They still have terrible heartburn. Well, what does research tell us about medication and acid reflux? A study conducted by doctor Brennan Spiegel, director of cedars Sinai's health services found that half of the GERD patients who took over the counter medication called proton, pump inhibitors, still had persistent symptoms. For many, medication was just not the answer for their heartburn. Today, we'll focus on some nutritional solutions that may give you some relief. Again, I'm Melanie Beasley. I've been in the field of nutrition for over 30 years, and I have seen so many clients struggling with acid reflux. And I am pleased to say, I have been able to help most of these clients. I know Leah, you have as well. Absolutely. Of course, it takes some commitment and work on the part of the client, but we do see great success. Some clients do better after they give up alcohol. And while others, pizzas, the food that causes heartburn. Listeners, what food do you need to give up as you hear me talking? Is there some that comes to mind for you personally? Joining me today as our co host is Leah cline trout. Who is also a registered and licensed dietitian who has been with in WW for the past 8 years. She's also the mother of Landon who's four and baby Carly, who's 9 months. I remember those busy years, Leah. They're the best.

Brennan Spiegel Cedars Sinai Melanie Beasley Gerd Leah Leah Cline Landon Carly
Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

"Two thousand nine. A team of researchers discovered a previously unknown microbe in the hot springs of yellowstone national park now. The fungus is the star ingredient in a new line of food products. He was very very high in protein. And it's actually a very exciting protein because it's a complete protein. There's really not that many sources of complete putting out there. That's thomas jonas. Ceo of nature's find the chicago based startup developed a process to ferment. the fungus and create. What's now called five protein. They're using it to make a variety of foods so we've been able to make things that range from chicken nuggets hamburgers breakfast sausages to yogurts and cheese earlier this year. The company offered a limited line of cream cheese and breakfast sausage on its website. Jonas says the products will soon be sold at stores. He foresees growing demand for protein. Filled foods produce more sustainably than meat and dairy that whole supply chain is completely inefficient and using a tremendous amount of resources of land of water energy. So jonas says fi could provide a more climate-friendly alternative.

Thomas Jonas Yellowstone National Park Nuggets Chicago Jonas
The Gut-Brian Axis

Food for Thought

01:28 min | 1 year ago

The Gut-Brian Axis

"Now is a good time to go into the evidence surrounding something could the gut brain axes i guess kind of it is and why suddenly become not suddenly. I'm bane. i guess discovered why it's important. Yeah great ray. And it is so much in evidence around the gut brain access and what we do know from. The studies is that the gut brain axis is all these microbes have a two way communication between basically the entering nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract so alcott and the central nervous system. Which is the brain the vegas nerve and is referred to as the gut brain axis now. This communication occurs via the power sympathic nervous system which also is known as the rest and digest mode and this is the complete opposite response to our sympathetic nervous system. Which is that fight or flight mode which gets us ready. But the power sympathetic returns our body to the state of calm and rest whereas the sympathetic massive nervous system get the body ready for that fight or flee which can increase blood pressure breathing slowing down at digestion and take him blood and oxygen away to other parts of the body. So it's important that people know is this of two way. Communication almost like a highway caused going back and forth between the garden rain.

Vegas
Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

Science Vs

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

"Today. We're looking at whether it really is that bad for your health to be fat and a quick note about our words in this episode. A lot of people don't like the words overweight or obese. Some people prefer the term fat as a neutral way to describe a person's body like tall but not everyone is comfortable with using fat this way and meanwhile overweight and obese have specific definitions medicine. So we're going to end up using all these terms but we'll try to be careful about when and why we use them okay so in order to talk about this at all we've got to with the bmi the body mass index every stat. You've never heard about how many americans are overweight comes from this measure. Hundreds of thousands of studies rely on it. It's a staple of modern medicine. So where on earth did it come from to find out. We're going to go back to the nineteen fifties do the university of minnesota's football stadium. The golden gophers are battling it out in the big ten conference. Our story starts down in the depths of the stadium entered through gate twenty seven. Just as if you had a ticket gate twenty so and then there's a maze of of hallways and offices along under the sloping of the The bleachers above this is henry blackburn. He's taking us to the lab where the bmi was born. He's a professor emeritus and minnesota so When when we worked there on a saturday could hear a distant rumble. When the minnesota eighteen got a touchdown run out and run up the causeway and see if we could see the extra point kick sometimes invaded by berman. Because of all those who left the stands and the carter but it was our place. Were very much at home. There and one thing they were doing and as weird lab was trying to answer this big question. How much fat do we have in our bodies. This was important because scientists figured it was the first step and understanding whether fat is bad for us

Golden Gophers Henry Blackburn University Of Minnesota Minnesota Football Berman
Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

Ask The Health Expert

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

"Have been talking about burbank for years. Because i've been talking about kito for twenty years and i've been talking about burberry for probably about half as long. It's one of the most houghton's anti-aging anti-diabetic key tone insulin sensitivity improving if improves amp k. Protects you from advanced location and products and glorification which is blood sugar damage. This is such a powerful compound. As is it's kind of drug equivalent metformin in so anyone associated with having diabetes or insulin resistance definitely as interested in metformin or the herbal equivalent of covering but certainly people that are into anti aging and looking to lower information with crp. Lower hemoglobin a. One c the blood sugar and live longer are taking things like verb ring. Or now the new form that i was involved in patents of kodi hydro bordering. So what's cool about die. Hydra ring is it's about five to ten times more bioavailable so it increases much more in the plasma at a much lower dose you only have to take about one hundred milligrams versus five hundred milligrams of burberry and also what's really cool is it lasts about twice as long in the plasma versus standard burglary so standard burberry. And you're taking five hundred milligrams three times a day and with diana jabbering you're taking around one hundred milligrams two times a

Kito Burberry Burbank Houghton Insulin Resistance Diabetes Diana
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

"Welcome to nutrition facts. I'm your host. Dr michael gregor today. We look at ways to mitigate a serious mental health disorder. Depression there's accumulating evidence in brain derived neurotrophic fact may be playing a role in human depression beady. Nf controls the growth of new nerve cells so low levels may explain the atrophy of specific brain areas. You see among depressed patients that maybe one of the reasons exercises so good for our brains. Starting our day exercise regimen within three months you can get a quadrupling obedient. F- reliefs from your brain. This makes sense. I mean anytime. We were desperate to catch prey or desperate not to become prey ourselves. We needed to be cognitively sharp. And so when we're fasting or exercising or an negative calorie balance. Our brain starts churning out. Bvd nf to make sure we're firing on all cylinders. So of course. Big farm as eager to create drugs to mimic this effect. But is there any way to boost enough naturally. Yes i just said it. Fasting and exercise. Okay okay but is there anything we can add to our diet to boost obedient. Well hiring takes dietary flavonoids appear to be protectively associated with symptoms of depression. The harvard nurses study followed tens of thousands of women for years and found that those who are eating the most to appeared to reduce the risk of coming down with depression. Flavonoids occur naturally implants. So there's a statue mountain variety of healthy foods. But how do we know. The benefits are from the flavonoids and not just from eating healthier in general. You don't know until you put it to the test. See some fruits and vegetables have more than others. Apples have more than apricots plums. More than peaches red cabbage. More than white kale. More than cucumbers. So if you randomize people into one of three groups more high flavonoids fruits and vegetables. More low flavonoids fruits and vegetables or no extra fruits and vegetables at all after eighteen weeks. Only the high flavonoids group got a significant boost and obedient f- levels which corresponded to an improvement in cognitive

Dr Michael Gregor Depression Harvard
Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Food Heaven Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

"To the podcast. Sabrina thank you on so excited to have you so tell us about how you started to explore issues of body image and wait specifically for women of color while this is actually almost like a family legacy for me. My grandmother was born in rural georgia during the late nineteen thirties and so she was growing up the jim crow era and lived in a racially segregated community as part of the great migration in nineteen sixty. She traveled west and at that time for the first time in her life she lived and worked around white women and she was amazed by the number of white women diets. Seems like what is this. You know sort of like a typical black grandmother fashioned. By the time. I came of age in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s. When i was in high school she was still troubling over. This question like what is going on here. She would even ask me like why women dying to be thin. And i was like sixteen years old but it wasn't until about ten years later when i was working in a predominantly black community in san francisco baby hunters points. I met women of color who were hiv positive. And we're attaining an hiv medication adherence clinic where i was a researcher who refuse to take their medications for fear of gaining weight. And i thought oh. Wow you know this. What was clearly a phenomenon that was mostly about middle class white women in the nineteen sixties arguably even through the ninety s. Clearly by the early dots was something. That was impacting women of color as well so i wanted to be able to dig further into this question of why is it so important for women of all racial ethnic backgrounds at this point to feel like they need to discipline themselves and maintain a particular. Wait

Sabrina Georgia San Francisco