Native American

Listen to the latest audio content in Native American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Native American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Canada's colonial co-dependency with the Assembly of First Nations (ep 307)

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

00:48 sec | 8 hrs ago

A highlight from Canada's colonial co-dependency with the Assembly of First Nations (ep 307)

"When it comes to describing the financial relationship between the assembly of First Nations and the Canadian government, which, let's face it, signs its checks, critics saw anything but kind. Through their jaded eyes, the department of Indian affairs purse strings serve more like a leash on AFM, tightened whenever someone misbehaves. And if this chief's lobby group can't much function without so called Canadian taxpayers money, which to be fair is more like first nation's resources, effectively given back to them, is this oddball offshoot of perennial paternalism the best we can do in this era of reconciliation, a long-standing question recently renewed by documents, appearing to show federal bureaucrats committed to keeping the assembly from coloring outside the lines. In a moment, we'll sit with the

Canadian Government Department Of Indian Affairs Assembly Of First Nations Assembly
A highlight from Friday, December 2, 2022  Native playlist: Northern Crees skimactahowin: A New Beginning

Native America Calling

04:53 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Friday, December 2, 2022 Native playlist: Northern Crees skimactahowin: A New Beginning

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Vice president Kamala Harris vowed to fight to protect the Indian child welfare act, Harris discussed ICWA in remarks at The White House tribal nation summit, which was held this week in Washington, D.C.. She says she has a long-standing history of fighting for the principles of ICWA pointing to her work as an attorney and now as vice president. Harris says she's fully aware of the essential protection ICWA provides. And back to my time doing that work as an attorney, representing children and families in San Francisco and working on equal cases to my time as attorney general of California and partnering with tribal leaders and child welfare agencies and law enforcement officials to enforce ICWA. I will tell you, as I stand here as vice president, the President Biden and I remain determined to work with you with native leaders to safeguard the protections of ICWA. Some had attendee Monique baker, governance administrator for the tribal government of St. Paul, Alaska, says she feels comforted, The White House is acknowledging the challenges tribal families face. It gives me comfort to know we have someone like vice president Harris in this position, who's not only acknowledges what tribal families went through native children being torn away from their families and the trauma they endured and knowing that something is being done to make sure this will never happen again. It's truly amazing to hear all this during the summit this year. And I look forward to hearing more next year. Harris made the comments about ICWA as challenges to the decades old law intended to keep native children with native families was recently heard in the U.S. Supreme Court. On Thursday, tribal leaders and top federal officials hosted a number of panels at the summit, including on healthcare, baker says she's interested in information and discussions about extending healthcare after childbirth. Baker says providing postpartum care including depression screenings is a huge step in the right direction for native families. That means so much for all native women. I mean, as a mother, myself, I wish I had that coverage. I wish I knew more about things like that. The two day White House tribal nation summit concluded Thursday with topics ranging from veterans issues to a special message from astronaut Nicole Mann, who's currently in space on a mission, the first Native American woman to go to space. The interior department is putting $75 million toward community relocation efforts for three tribes in Alaska and Washington state that are struggling with the consequences of a changing climate. We've never really done anything like this before. In this country, particularly for tribes. Brian Lynn is the assistant secretary for Indian affairs, he says the interior department hopes to capitalize on some of the progress new talk Alaska has already made and develop a blueprint for the federal government's future response to climate change. You know, we want to make sure that we are gaining experience on the federal side of things working with tribes to do climate relocation work. Newland says the department wait a lot of factors in deciding how to allocate the money. We evaluated a number of communities that have gone through some of our climate funding programs before. And we waited a number of different factors like readiness need existing plans as well as our ability to glean lessons learned. The tribes will also receive funding from the federal emergency management agency, 8 other tribes across the U.S. will share $40 million to assist in planning for climate change mitigation. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. What if someone said you owe money to the IRS and have to pay with a gift card, or they ask for a gift card so you can avoid going to jail, stop it's a scam. Gift cards are for gifts, not payments. Report scams at report fraud dot FTC dot gov support by the Federal Trade Commission.

Icwa Harris Antonio Gonzalez Vice President Kamala Harris Washington, D.C. Monique Baker Tribal Government Of St. Paul Alaska White House Nicole Mann Interior Department Biden Brian Lynn San Francisco U.S. Supreme Court California Baker
A highlight from How the Labrador Innu are picking up the pieces of the past to build a new future

Unreserved

02:08 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How the Labrador Innu are picking up the pieces of the past to build a new future

"Organic air? It's village. As indigenous people, we are used to our stories getting a little twisted. So listen up as we set the record straight. Please join me as we hear from dozens of indigenous people together we will decolonize our words and our minds on the telling our twisted history's podcast. You can find an episodes on the CBC listen app or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. Davis inlet, the shantytown on the Labrador coast that the people of Netflix used to call home. This is where the inu were dumped and ignored for 50 years. Canada's third world, a dark secret of despair that the federal government had been told was as bad and inhumane as some of the poorest places on earth. Last night, life took another chilling turn in Davis inlet, an innu village on Labrador's north coast to the community's horror 6 local children were found nearly unconscious in an unheated shack on the town's government wharf. They had been hiding inside and sniffing gasoline, apparently trying to commit suicide. For years, the inu have been asking to be moved again. This time to a place where they can at least have a sewage system and clean water. The federal and provincial governments are considering that request, but it's expensive. And so far, government leaders haven't been able to decide on what they think is best for the people of Davis inland. It's the early 1990s. The headlines and news stories are heartbreaking. Children huddled in a cold shack sniffing to numb themselves. From the poverty, violence, and hopelessness that surrounded their tiny in you community. After ignoring the problem they created for decades, the government finally took action. Eventually moving the inu from Davis inlet further down

Davis Inlet Labrador Coast CBC Netflix North Coast Labrador Federal Government INU Davis Inland Canada Government
A highlight from Thursday, December 1, 2022  The importance of tribal museums

Native America Calling

05:16 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Thursday, December 1, 2022 The importance of tribal museums

"Welcome to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Tribal museum serve an important purpose. There are resource hub, they house archives for important and sacred items, and they're always buzzing with educational and cultural activities. And the knowledgeable people curating exhibits are also some of the same people advocating for the return of important cultural items, and heavily involved in nagpur efforts. As the first ever tribal museum's day approaches, we're getting the celebration started. We'll be back after the news. This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. President Biden on Wednesday told tribal leaders he made a commitment to tribal nations as a U.S. senator in his 30s. Then when he ran for president and is now continuing his promise to tribes as president of the United States, Biden says he's respecting nation to nation relationships. He made the remarks at The White House tribal nation summit taking place in person in Washington, D.C., Biden says his administration has worked on strengthening relationships with tribes and has made financial investments in Indian country. He says tribes not only have a seat at the table, but also have Native American representation and key positions, including secretary of the interior Deb haaland. My watch rushing into new era in advancing away from the federal government to work with tribal nations. And it starts by appointing Native Americans to lead the front lines of my administration. You know, starting with secretary Howland, the Holland, we followed dozens of Senate confirmed Native American officials, over 60 Native American appointees, all across my administration, including in the federal courts. Biden says he also restored The White House council on Native American affairs to improve coordination with federal agencies and tribes, the administration is making a number of announcements this week relating to its work in Indian country from sacred site protection to measures to boost economic development to native language, preservation. About ten tribal leaders met privately with President Biden Wednesday, central council of Clinton and haida Indian tribes of Alaska president Richard Peterson was one of them. It's pretty great. I actually was one of the few tribal leaders selected to meet the president, so that was pretty special. Peterson says tribal leaders were able to have a brief moment with the president to share priorities. Peterson mentioned the taking of land into trust by the bureau of Indian affairs for his tribe, according to the interior department that recent action is the second feed of trust acquisition in Alaska since the passage of the Alaska native claims settlement act in the 1970s. And it's the first in 5 years. The land is located in Juneau among things. It will help with federal services and programs and foster economic development. And so we're appreciative of that. Talked about some of the other issues. We talked about broadband Arthur infrastructure, you know, it was a very fast turn. Peterson says he's grateful to have had a moment with the president. He says under this administration, tribes are seeing more Native American and Alaska native representation in Washington, which is helping tribes gain traction on their priorities. Vice president Kamala Harris also addressed tribal leaders Wednesday. She reiterated the nation to nation relationship building and the administration's commitment to tribes. The White House tribal nation summit continues Thursday. Montana U.S. senator John tester Wednesday announced the introduction of a bill that aims to provide more support for homeless native veterans. Aaron Bolton has more. The Bill would carve out a portion of housing vouchers for use by indigenous vets enrolled in the VA and tribal housing authorities. The housing vouchers are offered by the U.S. Department of Housing and urban development and given to vets enrolled in VA case management services, Native Americans serve in the military at higher rates compared to other racial groups and studies indicate that native veterans experience the highest rate of homelessness according to the VA. The bill would also require that both the VA and hud consult with tribes to better offer resources to homeless vets, and report to Congress on the issue every 5 years. The current term of Congress is scheduled to end in the coming weeks. In Columbia falls, Aaron Bolton. And Damien Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Program support by Penguin Random House publisher of probably rooted by Lisa bird Wilson, a novel about a make tea woman adopted by white parents who goes in

President Biden Biden Sean Spruce Tribal Museum Antonio Gonzalez U.S. Washington, D.C. Deb Haaland Secretary Howland Alaska White House Council On Native Peterson Central Council Of Clinton Richard Peterson Nagpur Bureau Of Indian Affairs White House Vice President Kamala Harris Aaron Bolton Federal Government
A highlight from Wednesday, November 30, 2022  Klamath River tribes praise dam removal momentum

Native America Calling

05:33 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Wednesday, November 30, 2022 Klamath River tribes praise dam removal momentum

"Welcome to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. For decades, tribes along the klamath river in Northern California and southern Oregon have been calling for the removal of several hydroelectric dams, and their nonstop advocacy has paid off. The federal energy regulatory commission just cleared the way to take out four of the largest dams. It's an important move to save the river salmon, which is a precious cultural resource for the tribes along the river. We'll hear more about this historic decision right after the news. This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Secretary of the interior Deb haaland says in the last two years, the Biden Harris administration has committed to working with tribes and has made many investments in Indian country. Holland delivered opening remarks at The White House tribal nation summit Wednesday morning, which is being held in person in Washington, D.C.. She told tribal leaders the interior department alone has invested more than $45 billion in Indian country through the American rescue plan, the bipartisan infrastructure law, and the inflation reduction act. Holland talked about a land transfer for Montana tribes and announced a new oral history project slated for 2023 for Indian boarding school survivors. This has never been undertaken by the United States government. And is a resource that I know many of you will have requested as part of your own work to document your own history. This project demonstrates the new era I spoke of over the next two days you will hear even more about the work that is happening and the opportunities with your partnerships that lie ahead. Holland announced the creation of a new office of strategic partnerships, which is working to build 9 new bureau of Indian education school yards across the country. She touched on tribal coast stewardship to address climate change and co management of lands and waters. She says there's work being done on broadband, including an agreement to help bring electromagnetic spectrum access to tribal lands. Holland says she'll be meeting with tribal leaders throughout the next two days to discuss issues impacting Indian country. Wednesday morning also included tribal leaders and administration officials taking part in a panel on education and at native languages. Tribal leaders from the country's 574 federally recognized tribes were invited to take part in the two day summit. During the white house tribal nations summit, President Biden is expected to proclaim a Nevada sacred site off limits to development, with a formal designation of Avi kome as a national monument, native groups have been advocating for its protection. The area is sacred to 12 tribes and is the center of creation stories, says Taylor Patterson with the native voters alliance, Nevada. It's the place where all of their traditional stories and knowledge comes from and then for our southern pipe tribes in the area, it's also a part of the salt song trail. And so that tells really the life cycle of paiute people and how they moved through the land and all the important places plants and animals in the area. It's located between the Lake mead national recreation area and the Nevada California border covering nearly 450,000 acres in southwestern, Nevada. A federal judge has ordered Enbridge and the bad river tribe in Wisconsin to come up with a joint plan to avoid a spill from an oil and gas pipeline showed erosion worsen on the tribe's reservation. Danielle Katie reports the ruling stems from the tribe's lawsuit that seeks to shut down the Canadian energy firms pipeline on its reservation, and bridges line 5 pipeline will continue to operate, but U.S. district judge William Conley said risk of a significant rupture exists where it crosses the bad river. Conley said the negative effects in the bad river watershed and Lake Superior could be catastrophic. The line carries up to 23 million gallons of oil per day from superior across northern Wisconsin to sarnia Ontario. The federal judge ordered Enbridge and bad river to meet by December 17th to discuss installation of emergency shutoff valves, a joint proposal for shutting down and purging the line and projects that could slow further erosion. The two must submit their proposal by Christmas Eve. An Ember spokesperson says it looks forward to discussing the issues with bad river. Bad river tribal chairman Mike Wiggins junior did not respond to requests for comment. For national native news, I'm Daniel kading. And Antonio Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. You've probably seen those car ads, low price low payments, but when you get to the dealer there could be a catch. If a dealer isn't honest when it comes to its car ads, tell the Federal Trade Commission at report fraud FTC dot gov support by the Federal Trade Commission. Program support by Penguin Random House publisher of probably ruby by Lisa bird Wilson, a novel about a make tea woman adopted by white parents who goes

Holland Antonio Gonzalez Sean Spruce Deb Haaland Biden Harris Administration Washington, D.C. Office Of Strategic Partnershi Bureau Of Indian Education Sch Nevada Klamath River Federal Energy Regulatory Comm President Biden Avi Kome Interior Department Center Of Creation Stories Taylor Patterson Northern California Native Voters Alliance United States Government
A highlight from Tuesday, November 29, 2022  Native in the Spotlight: Major Robinson

Native America Calling

03:25 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Tuesday, November 29, 2022 Native in the Spotlight: Major Robinson

"Request for comment, dot Lake village president Tracy Charles Smith said, TCC is not a tribe, but is asserting tribal rights without getting the consent of its member tribes. And so doing TCC is claiming that it may violate its governing rules without consequence. TCC did not respond to an interview request by Ku AC, but an oppressed release announcing the case dismissal. TCC chief and chairman Brian Ridley says they're ready to move past these issues and have worked hard over the past year to heal the organization and continue to move forward with strength unity and respect. A new study shows that a wide variety of Arctic animals, including polar bears, are being exposed to a tick-borne disease normally associated with rabbits and hairs the Alaska Beacon and online journal reported the findings, the U.S. geological survey conducted the study to look for signs of exposure to the bacterium that causes tularemia, also known as rabbit fever. The research is designed to help scientists track diseases as the Arctic warms and they spread north, Alaska native people could be the first to feel its impacts if tularemia spreads to the animals they hunt. Arctic foxes and Arctic ground squirrels showed the highest levels of antibodies in the blood to fight it, Caribou showed the lowest levels polar bears were in the middle. Geese examined in the project also showed exposure antibodies to the bacterium do not necessarily mean the animals had tularemia, only that they were exposed to it. It's rare for the disease to spread to humans, although some cases have been documented in Alaska, according to the CDC, some of the symptoms are skin ulcers, sore throats, and in the most serious cases, pneumonia like coughs, chest pain, and breathing difficulties. A Native American writer and actor for the peacock series Rutherford falls says, while it's disappointing the show was not picked up for a third season, indigenous representation and popular media is still strong. Here's Janice meeting. There tend to be elimination of newer shows, shows that don't have as many viewers and I think Rutherford falls as possibly a victim of some larger shifts that are happening in the industry. And that we're seeing with other shows as well. Meaning adds many writers and performers with Rutherford falls are already involved with other productions. She's continuing work with another native theme series, reservation dogs, which has been renewed for a third season. President Biden will host The White House tribal nation summit Wednesday and Thursday at the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., the summit provides an opportunity for tribal leaders from the 574 federally recognized tribes to engage with the federal government. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by quantic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for

TCC Tularemia Tracy Charles Smith Ku Ac Brian Ridley Rutherford Falls Alaska Rabbit Fever Skin Ulcers Online Journal Geese Arctic Coughs Chest Pain U.S. CDC Pneumonia Janice President Biden Washington, D.C.
A highlight from Monday, November 28, 2022  The Menu: Native gifts a la carte

Native America Calling

07:56 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Monday, November 28, 2022 The Menu: Native gifts a la carte

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Saint George island is an Alaska native community that prides itself on its resourcefulness, but that was put to the test after its water system failed. The island is about 200 miles off the coast of Alaska. Only 35 people live there and they were not able to drink their tap water for almost a month. It's been pretty murky. It's Brown even boiling, don't trust to use it for washing dishes. Anastasia, cashew vero off says tribes and native corporations donated supplies of bottled water, which went fast. The public safety building did have water that could be used for cleaning. Cashew veer off says families had to haul 5 gallon buckets to their homes to flush toilets and mop floors. This went on for several weeks as crews tried to pinpoint the cause of the problem. Finally, they tracked it down to a broken water line when the city crew dug into the ground, they were shocked at what they found, a clean break in the pipe that was right on top of a huge rock. The mayor of saint George, Mark Marquis, began to wonder if an earthquake caused the damage, one had jolted the island a few days before the water ran out. Although the cause of the break will likely remain a mystery, he says the community learned a lot from the experience. And also to be able to whether it's state agencies or federal agencies build and explain situations like that. The water system was up and running in time for Thanksgiving, but saint George still has to boil its drinking water until the lines are completely flushed out. Mary peltola, who won a special election to cover the rest of the late Alaska congressman Don young's term went on to become the first Alaskan native woman elected to Congress, and now has become the first Alaska U.S. representative to be elected by ranked choice voting. Last week, when second choice ballots were counted, peltola received enough to win the race and credits the new system of voting to her election. I am not liberal leaning enough. I think that at the beginning of the race and the special, there were two individuals that were really favored and chosen and it was their time was the feedback that I was getting from a lot of folks within the democratic establishment. Pel tola won with 54% of the vote about 10% more than her Republican challenger, former governor Sarah Palin. Proponents of ranked choice voting say the system helps to elect more moderate candidates and minorities. Peltola says she'll focus on Alaska priorities and will try to balance that with efforts to work on behalf of Native Americans. She says her election gets her a seat at the table, which puts her in a position to help tribes. Native American comedian and writer Janice meeting switched gears ahead of her planned visit to the university of Oregon last week. Brian bull has more. Schmidt had planned to do a day full of activities at her Alma mater, but Tessa positive for COVID after landing in Eugene. I got it at a smashing pumpkins concert at the Hollywood Bowl. So we'll blame the smashing pumpkins fans. Instead, Schmidt did visit NAB indigenous joy campus presentation via Zoom to keep people safe. She's a U O alum of the class of 2005. And it's written enacted for two native themed series, Rutherford falls and reservation dogs. Schmittian assures fans that are COVID cases mild. She's up on our vaccinations, and she's resting at her parents place. I'm not suffering at all. And I'm well taken care of. My mom and my dad are really showing up for me. Relatives, including her brother, grandmother, and a cousin, appeared at the Tuesday event on her behalf. For national native news, I'm Brian bull. And Dan Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. You've probably seen those car ads, low price low payments, but when you get to the dealer there could be a catch. If a dealer isn't honest when it comes to its car ads, tell the Federal Trade Commission at report fraud FTC dot gov support by the Federal Trade Commission. Support for law and justice related programming provided by Hobbes Strauss dean and walker, a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for nearly 40 years. More information available at Hobbs Strauss dot com. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is the menu on native America calling, our regular feature on indigenous food and food news. I'm your host Andy Murphy. The holiday season has officially started and you're probably thinking about gifts for your loved ones. If you're like me and you love everything to do with the kitchen and pantry, a gift of food is the best. Native foods like cornmeal, wild tea, and maple syrup, bar specialty, and there are actually plenty of native food companies out there that are making our traditional foods available for purchasing and gift giving. In this hour, I'll talk with a couple of folks who are very familiar with dozens of native food businesses across the country. You can join us too. What native food businesses are you excited about? Do you have a question about native food and or where to get it? We're at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's also one 809 9 native. Joining us now from vernal, Utah is latasha red House. She's the director of American Indian foods and she is Navajo. Welcome to native America Colleen, Natasha. Hi, wonderful. It's so nice to hear from you. Here to you. Yeah. Yeah, you too. It's been a while. I think the last time we talked was last year during, you know, when we were all working from home and everybody was moving their conferences and everything over to zoom, you guys still held in a tribal agriculture council conference online. And you know, I want to talk about that conference. It's coming up in just a bit, but I want to ask you first latosha, can you just give us a definition of American Indian foods? Yeah, yeah, this is with my hat on of American Indian Food Program director. American Indian foods is just this amazing celebration of our harvest or even just of our traditional teachings or culture, it's just in the American Indian foods program. We promote and market various different products from rock commodity to value added. So it's just really, really interesting to see how many different products are available out there. And so I feel like when we're talking about American Indian foods, it's just, again, going back to celebrating our traditional and cultural

Alaska Brian Bull Antonio Gonzalez Saint George Island Mark Marquis Mary Peltola Peltola Pel Tola Federal Trade Commission Schmidt Schmittian Saint George Don Young Anastasia
A highlight from Friday, November 25, 2022  The buying season from a Native retailers perspective

Native America Calling

05:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Friday, November 25, 2022 The buying season from a Native retailers perspective

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Efforts to restore bison in central Wyoming could hold the key to strengthening ecosystems and economies across western states. Eric galatis has more. Eastern shoshone tribal member Jason baldus is working to bring buffalo back onto tribal lands to roam freely, starting with a small herd on the wind river Indian reservation in central Wyoming. He says restoring a wildlife economy will require a shift in vision for land management away from the status quo driven exclusively by dollars. But for native people, a healthy environment is much more valuable. And so as we restore bison to the landscape for their Keystone role as an ecosystem engineer, then we're restoring the land and we're thinking more about biodiversity in the interconnectedness of all these beings that are here. Unlike grazing cattle that decrease plant and animal biodiversity critical for ecosystems, baldus notes bison increased biodiversity by creating food and habitat for hundreds of species. Their dust bathing creates micro depressions, important for seed dispersal and water accumulation, their hooves naturally aerate the soil, every winter, they put on a new coat which becomes available for many species of birds when they shed in the spring. For thousands of years before America's first residents were stripped of their lands and food supplies, the health and wealth of native communities in the region was directly connected to bison. Baldwin says despite being separated for a 130 years, the animal is still very present in cultural belief systems, including their annual Sundance. It's in our sweat lodge ceremonies. It's in our House ceremonies. We still have songs about the buffalo. That animal historically was our life's commissary. It was our store was where our foods are medicines, our tools, our material came from. The eastern band of shoshone were also widely renowned as buffalo eaters, and baldus says bringing herds back to western lands managed as wild animals will also help tribes heal. We have the highest rates of diabetes and heart disease and other health related issues because of the removal of buffalo from our diet. So incorporating that back into our diet again is very important. It's the highest in protein, minerals and vitamins in the lowest in fat and cholesterol than any other meat. This is Eric galatis reporting. Miss Indian New Mexico 2022 says she's a cultural ambassador role model and public servant. Alicia Corey's is representing the 23 tribal nations in New Mexico, but says she's also serving the state as a whole, as well as an understanding that this title is a pillar of hope for all of our communities. And it's also another space for me to utilize this platform to call forth and inspire others to continue to be the solutions to their communities needs. The miss Indian New Mexico pageant includes traditional talent, traditional skill, contemporary talent, personal interview, and knowledge about New Mexico. She ran on a platform of empowerment through community building. When we get our communities, people together to have conversations and connect with one another. And continue to build a deeper understanding of the issues and the impacts that the challenges that we face. This is a time where we're able to meet and continue to build community together. And that's all part of how we honor ourselves through kinship through community. And as well as when we find that connection, we feel that we have the support system. We are building that system. In order for us to feel empowered to have a voice and continue to regroup as a community and find the solutions and be the solutions. Corey's will serve a year as miss Indian, New Mexico. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by chronic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support by Ramona farms offering wholesome and delicious foods from our heirloom crops as our contribution to a better diet for the benefit of all people. We are honored to share our centuries old farming and culinary traditions online at Ramona farms dot com. Support by BNSF railway proudly supporting the nation's economy by moving the goods that feed, supply, and power communities across the country. More at BNSF dot com slash tribal relations. Native voice one the Native American radio network.

Eric Galatis Buffalo Antonio Gonzalez Jason Baldus Wind River Indian Reservation Wyoming New Mexico Baldus Alicia Corey Baldwin Heart Disease America Diabetes Antonia Gonzalez Ramona Farms Corey Bnsf
A highlight from episode 417 "A National Day of Mourning"

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

02:51 min | Last week

A highlight from episode 417 "A National Day of Mourning"

"Today, Americans are celebrating a holiday, they call Thanksgiving. It is a time where they share food and time with families. Watch commercialized parades on TV, and then some. Finish their day by watching a professional football game. For myself, I do spend time with my family. And I definitely share a nice meal. However, I am not celebrating this day as a holiday. Instead, today is one of my national days of mourning. I am thinking about my pequod ancestors who unwillingly gave their lives for this country. Not through a military war, but instead they had their lives destroyed by this country through acts of genocide. Their deaths were literally celebrated by the first colonial settlers. Under the first established American colony in Massachusetts. That celebration in 1637 marked the first American Thanksgiving. It is why on this day it is considered our national day of mourning. Since 1970, indigenous people and their allies have gathered at noon on Cole's hill in Plymouth, Massachusetts. To commemorate a national day of mourning, on the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday. Many native people do not celebrate the arrival of the pilgrims and other European settlers. Thanksgiving Day is a reminder of the genocide of millions of native people. The theft of native lands, and the erasure of native cultures. Participants in national day of mourning honor indigenous ancestors and native resilience. It is a day of remembrance and spiritual connection. As well as a protest against the racism and oppression that indigenous people continue to experience worldwide. This year, we are sharing some of the speeches given at the united American Indians of New England, national day of mourning event. We hope our listeners will hear some perspectives that you did not hear through any national news media or cable news organization. And for more information about the United American Indians of New England, please visit our website at WWW dot U, and E dot org. And now, the 53rd annual national day of morning. As presented on Thanksgiving Day, November 24th, 2022.

Cole's Hill Massachusetts Football Plymouth United American Indians U.S. New England
A highlight from A decade of Idle No More

Unreserved

01:12 min | Last week

A highlight from A decade of Idle No More

"That's the sound of over 4000 people, taking over a mall with a round dance. It's just one of many videos that captured similar historical events across the country. This unprecedented testament was recorded at polo park mall in Winnipeg. A testament that said, we are idle no more. Don say anin, boujee. Hello and welcome. This is unreserved on CBC radio one, I'm Rosanna dear child. It was a resistance movement that shook a nation, and this year I don't know more, is ten years old. Today, on radio indigenous, how the drum beat of idle no more continues to reverberate. In her hearts, our communities and around the world. This is the reason why you are here today. To tell the concern is they do not have your consent.

Polo Park Mall Anin Winnipeg Cbc Radio Rosanna DON
A highlight from Thursday, November 24, 2022  The enduring artistry of Buffy Sainte-Marie

Native America Calling

04:43 min | Last week

A highlight from Thursday, November 24, 2022 The enduring artistry of Buffy Sainte-Marie

"Hold your hand welcome to native America calling, I'm Sean spruce. Cleans Cree singer songwriter Buffy saint Marie remains a creative force as she enters her 9th decade. The trailblazing artist is the subject of an American master's profile now out on PBS. It includes one on one interviews with her and her contemporaries, including Joni Mitchell and Robbie Robertson and other musicians like Jeremy dutcher who looked to her as an inspiration. We'll talk with Buffy saint Marie and have a few surprises. That's coming up after the news. We're saying. Keep playing. We're praying. It ain't money. This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. A boarding school healing ceremony was held in anchorage, Alaska this fall, the ceremony took part as people from across the state gathered for the 2022 first alaskans institute's elders and youth conference. To call the regalia storyteller and cultural bearer, bob Sam from sitka opened up the healing event by sharing some history of boarding schools in southeast Alaska from the early opening of the Sheldon Jackson school to students who were sent to the Carlisle Indian school in Pennsylvania. Sam says it was devastating for students to be stripped of their languages and cultures. He also shared some stories of boarding school survivors talking about the trauma they endured. Students were often told, they were worthless, and many were physically mentally and sexually abused. And when they arrived in Carlisle, it had to have been the worst experience of their life. Sam, who works on repatriation efforts, has brought home the remains of many students. He says that work and his overall research of U.S. Indian boarding schools has caused him much trauma. He spent many years in Japan learning about Japanese culture. He then returned home to Alaska, embracing his clinic culture to help him heal from the trauma primarily I returned bodies. Public, but I. Began to listen to the survivors and people who suffered from the trauma of boarding schools and from there I developed the ceremony. Sam put on his traditional regalia, which he says. The healing process describing each piece from his tunic to an orange apron representing every child matters, a robe and a woven headband representing indigenous boarding school students in Canada. Sam then told a story about Raven and the return of traditional knowledge to the people. Sam ended the ceremony by having people form two lines, boarding school survivors, then walked down and were given affirmations, handshakes, and hugs from each person. As Sam sang. I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The department of interior is continuing its investigation into U.S. Indian boarding schools, the agency is traveling across the country gathering testimony this fall, a stop was made in South Dakota as lay strub iner reports. 78 year old rosalie quick bear attended one of the 31 boarding schools located in South Dakota. The cej Lakota describes being powdered with the pesticide DDT, spending weeks with an untreated broken leg and getting locked in a dark cement cellar for days. Quick bear describes her experience like this to her grandkids. You see all this horse stuff on TV? Real bad. That's how we grew up. That's why we're like we are. Quick bear says her experience at Saint Francis Indian boarding school still affects her. There was no God. Just torture. Another survivor says every boarding school story is similar. Cheryl angel also spoke. We were treated inhumanely, its stories like this, the department of interior is collecting as part of the federal Indian boarding school initiative. The initiative hopes to identify marked and unmarked burial sites from across the boarding school system, interior secretary Deb haaland was also in attendance. She says the tour is one step among many. That we will take to strengthen and rebuild the bonds within native communities that the federal Indian boarding school policies set out to break. Unleashed in mission South

Buffy Saint Marie Sean Spruce SAM Jeremy Dutcher Antonio Gonzalez Alaskans Institute Alaska Bob Sam Sheldon Jackson School Carlisle Indian School Robbie Robertson America Joni Mitchell I. Began Department Of Interior PBS Sitka Anchorage Sam Sang Antonia Gonzalez
A highlight from Wednesday, November 23, 2022  The Native American Music Awards

Native America Calling

02:52 min | Last week

A highlight from Wednesday, November 23, 2022 The Native American Music Awards

"Networking activities designed to foster confidence in starting or growing a business. According to project leaders, the last cohort graduated 67 women who have started 30 businesses in Arizona. Van winkle previously worked in the medical field and says she didn't know much about what it took to run a mechanic business, but she's taken her skills and experienced and used them in new ways in her new company. She says one of the most overwhelming parts of the journey was knowing where to begin, but dreamcatcher helps participants devise a plan. They had a professor come in and talk to us about how to understand revenues, expenses, gross profits, value, cash flow and owners equity. Those are large words for some of us that didn't go to business school. Van winkle says having a support system as the new business is fundamental. She encourages the next women who enroll in project dreamcatcher to be open minded, ask questions and use the resources available to them. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, American Indian and Alaska native owned businesses contributed over $39 billion to the economy last year, but make up only 1% of all firms. That was Alex Gonzalez reporting. Longtime tribal university president Lionel Bordeaux has passed away. The enrolled member of the rosebud Sioux tribe served as president of Cynthia Glasgow university for 50 years, said to be the longest serving university president in the United States, the university is located on the rosebud reservation in South Dakota. Bordeaux was well known as a strong advocate in the tribal college movement, his career also included working for the bureau of Indian affairs, his experience in Washington, D.C., was instrumental in helping him pursue passage of legislation to support tribal colleges and universities. Bordeaux was passionate about culturally based native higher education and service to the native community. He was a founder of the American Indian higher education consortium, which represents the 35 tribal colleges and universities across the country. And he was a founder of the American Indian college fund, the world's indigenous nations higher education consortium, and the tribal college journal. He passed away at age 82, a celebration of life is planned for December 1st at the tribal university. The Phoenix Suns honored the Native American basketball invitational or knobby Tuesday night during a game in Phoenix, Arizona. They celebrated a 20 year partnership between the organization and the professional basketball team, nabi host, the largest all indigenous basketball tournament in North America with more than 100 teams taking part in games each summer. Zombies event generates a local economic impact to the Phoenix area and has awarded thousands of dollars in scholarships to native college students. The organization was involved in the sun's new uniforms celebrating native culture and the showcasing of Arizona's 22 tribal nations at the arena. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Van Winkle Tribal University U.S. Census Bureau Lionel Bordeaux Rosebud Sioux Tribe Cynthia Glasgow University For Bureau Of Indian Affairs Washington, D.C. Bordeaux Alex Gonzalez Arizona American Indian Higher Educati American Indian American Indian College Fund World's Indigenous Nations Hig Tribal College Journal Alaska South Dakota
A highlight from Tuesday, November 22, 2022  Tracking missing people one name at a time

Native America Calling

01:05 min | Last week

A highlight from Tuesday, November 22, 2022 Tracking missing people one name at a time

"Welcome to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. The disparities when it comes to missing indigenous people are well documented. For a number of factors, native people are more likely to go missing than other populations. In new Mexico, federal law enforcement officials have devised with they hope, is an effective way to improve those statistics. Its concept seems logical, make a list of names that evolves over time or provide the comprehensive target to work with. It's part of a strategy officials and advocates in the state are using to address the problem. We'll hear more about it coming up after the news. This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. U.S. Department of Transportation secretary Pete Buttigieg met with tribal leaders in Albuquerque, New Mexico last week to discuss roadway safety in tribal communities, infrastructure investments,

Sean Spruce New Mexico America Antonio Gonzalez U.S. Department Of Transportat Pete Buttigieg Albuquerque
A highlight from Monday, November 21, 2022  The strength of female competitive weightlifting

Native America Calling

05:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Monday, November 21, 2022 The strength of female competitive weightlifting

"Lift? For female competitive power lifters and strong women, that number is an ever changing goal. And the weights they lift seem far out of reach for most of us. But it's more than just brute strength. There's rigorous conditioning and mental preparation. Today we'll talk with indigenous women who have taken up the sport of competitive lifting, we'll hear about what goes into it and how they're making their mark. That's coming up after the news. This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. For the first time in history of the state of Minnesota, off reservation land, has been returned to tribal hands. Has Barbara Jean Myers reports a ceremony to celebrate the land return, took place last week. The return plan, a stretch of beach along Lake superior's north shore, outside grand mere Minnesota, was once part of a larger native settlement known as chippewa city. The historic occasion was celebrated with the ceremony at the Graham portage lodge in casino. John Warren, a Graham portage tribal elder, was one of the keynote speakers. I heard many stories from my mother and my aunts and uncles about growing up in chip OS city. And growing up in walking on that and running and playing on the beach that we know gotten back. So it's a very personal day for me in a very historical day for the state of Minnesota Cook County and the grand portage homeland. The celebration was also very personal for area historian author and Graham portage tribal descendant Stacy drew lard. Like John Moore and chippewa city was home to many of drew lard's ancestors. Which means the edge of the forest or where the trees stand, which is a very, I think, beautiful name for the place. Drew lord's book, walking the old road, a people's history of chippewa city in the grand mere anishinaabe, helped raise awareness in the broader public about the significance of the area. Bobby de champ is the grand portage tribal council chairman. And 2022 like this for Indian country is just unbelievable. That 27,000 acres of that. Fondling, that Wisconsin point back. Did you guys tip what I said to you? For national native news, I'm Barbara Jean Myers. The northern Cheyenne tribe in southeastern Montana slated to receive $52 million in federal funding to expand broadband to nearly 2000 homes on the tribe's reservation. Aaron Bolton has more. Funding from the infrastructure Bill passed by Congress and signed by President Biden earlier this year is expected to connect 1700 homes in the northern Cheyenne Indian reservation to high-speed Internet. According to a broadband now report a little over half of reservation residents have access to high-speed Internet, but none of the available services are considered affordable for low income people. The confederated salish and kodi tribes and the blackfeet nation were both awarded nearly $75 million in grants through the same Internet for all initiative earlier this year. Roughly $3 billion of federal funding has been set aside to help tribes across the country improve broadband access. In Columbia falls, I'm Aaron Bolton. In Alaska's U.S. House race representative Mary peltola is still on track to win, absentee ballots counted on Friday. Now give her 49% of the vote. She needs more than 50% to win, a number she's expected to reach on Wednesday when second choice ballots are added to the totals under Alaska's new system of ranked choice voting in August, peltola was elected to serve the remainder of the late congressman Don young's term, which made the yupik from bethel the first Alaska native to serve in Congress. In the race for a full term, the Democrat is ahead of two Republicans, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin and Nick begich. Two New Mexico pueblos okay wingate and Santa Clara recently signed an agreement with the Army Corps of engineers to restore habitat and espanol, which is located 25 miles north of Santa Fe. The espinola valley ecosystem restoration project is a $100 million project to restore more than 900 acres of aquatic and riparian habitats along the Rio Grande river and its tributaries. The tribes will be working with the Army Corps Albuquerque district team, the agreement is said to be the first of its kind between the Army Corps and the pueblos and includes a provision to greatly reduce the cost share with tribal partners. I'm Antonio Gonzales. National native news is produced by kornik broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support for law and justice related programming provided by Hobbes Strauss dean and walker, a national

Chippewa City Barbara Jean Myers Antonio Gonzalez Minnesota Aaron Bolton Graham Portage Lodge Graham Portage Stacy Drew Drew Lard Drew Lord Bobby De Champ Grand Portage Tribal Council John Warren President Biden Lake Superior John Moore North Shore
The Stolen Indigenous Children

Unreserved

02:03 min | 1 year ago

The Stolen Indigenous Children

"It's a hot summer day in nineteen ninety emotions are high in boston. Independent nations today. This ojibway community is taking a stand. After decades of losing their children to the child welfare system they have come together to say no more. No more taking children by the busload from their homes. No more broken families. You aren't taking any more of our children get out. Stay out as a social worker. I'm responsible for the welfare of these children. My name is nicky. I can tell you being ripped away from my mother at six years old had nothing to do with my welfare look. I'm just doing my job. It's not your job anymore as chief of the wab soon nation. I'm here to tell you. We have passed a resolution. Banning the children's aid society from entering our community and taking any more of our children. You can't do that we just did. Yeah our children our future give sure give back our future. We did it teddy. You would have been so proud of us after the chaos of the rally. Nikki comforter her daughter at the kitchen table. It is a modest home. The sun streams through the windows colorful drawings of thunderbirds and pencil caller. Portrait's a woman and cad eyeglasses. A young shy smiling. Boy named teddy adorns the walls the pair sit together at the small table sipping tea and eating cookies

Boston Nicky Nikki
Sipekne'katik Chief Mike Sack Arrested as Treaty Fishery Begins Its Season in N.S.

Native America Calling

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Sipekne'katik Chief Mike Sack Arrested as Treaty Fishery Begins Its Season in N.S.

"The chief for the second largest mic. Mac band and nova scotia was arrested after launching a treaty lobster fishery negative first nation chief. Mike sack was arrested monday. He says officers with the canadian department of fisheries and oceans detained after his communities. Boats left the wharf sack told abt end that their charges were filed the treaty fishery which started in two thousand and twenty is self regulated by Inequity first nation is not been endorsed by the dfo federal body that regulates fisheries in canada. The f. o. Says the treaty fishery is an illegal fishery mcmahon non-indigenous lobster fishers continued about all for fishing rights stemming from one thousand nine hundred nine canada's supreme court ruling that upholds the halifax treaties the provides for the right to fish for digits people in canada. Last fall fishers began what they called it moderate livelihood fishery fishing where and when they wanted including outside the federally regulated fishing season. Non-indigenous fishers disputed the fishery pulled traps and burned a lobster pound the second equity fisheries department says that it is no longer using the term moderate livelihood fishery because it's a phrase coined by a court decision. The black feet incident command team issued an announcement this week outlining strategies to stop a recent surge in in nineteen cases. You'll also public radio's taylor. Stagner has more the black feet incident. Command team issued an announcement outlining strategies to stop a recent surge in cove nineteen cases. The black feet nation has issued a mandatory mask mandate tribal offices will be closed to the public and non essential tribal government. Travel will be suspended. James neely is the public relations representative for the black feet nation. He says that the reservation is not shutting down and it is. This does not affect her coming through to the park. This does not affect anybody leaving the reservation. Neely also says there are eighteen. Active cases of corona virus and these individuals have been linked to one hundred others through contact tracing the black feet nation has lost forty eight tribal members to the cove in one thousand nine pandemic for national native news. Taylor stagner

Mike Sack Canadian Department Of Fisheri Canada DFO Nova Scotia Stagner Mcmahon Halifax Supreme Court James Neely Taylor Neely Travel Taylor Stagner
When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

Native America Calling

02:00 min | 1 year ago

When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

"This summer saw some of the worst runs on alaska's yukon river but bristol bay processors have been enjoying great runs and donated fish to alaska native tribes along the yukon river kyi. Uk's olivia egberts reports. You're going to write the number of fish on this label. that's tanya ives. She's packing up chum. And kim salmon to be distributed to villages along the lower yukon river bristol. Bay processors sent the salmon too. Quick pack the only fish processing plant on the yukon. This donation is about twelve thousand. Pounds of salmon. Quick pack is splitting it up. Between ten lower yukon river villages the yukon river has seen its. Worst summer chum. Salmon run on record that means the commercial. Fishery is closed and puck can't sell salmon this year subsistence. Fishing for chum. Shook is also closed and many people along. The river have not had a taste of the fish yet. This season with puck voted the salmon community to community we down thousands of pounds of frozen fish a tender boats lowly motors up the cold rainy yukon. At the helm stands captain darren jennings saving delivering salmon to the villages is new to him in previous years. It'd be picking up commercial. Fisherman's fresh catch and taking it. Back to quick. Look we dock in saint. Mary's workers from all gotcha and undressed ski. Tribes the fish into their pickups and then drive them to households all evening a woman inge bay from saint. Mary's is grateful to have at least a bit of fish. We got to right now. I have them dying out. So i can can them with little opportunity for subsistence salmon. Fishing her grocery bill has gone out. her husband. walkie says they'll have to try for other species of fish to get them through the winter in saint. Mary's i'm olivia egberts.

Yukon River Olivia Egberts Tanya Ives Kim Salmon Yukon River Bristol Alaska Bristol Bay Darren Jennings UK Yukon Mary Walkie Saint
Wisconsin Sets 300-Wolf Limit After Runaway Spring Hunt

Native America Calling

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Wisconsin Sets 300-Wolf Limit After Runaway Spring Hunt

"A policy-setting board for wisconsin department of natural resources approved a wolf heart. Evista quota three hundred wolves for the states fall. Wolf hunts wisconsin tribes oppose and have called on the us fish and wildlife service to reconsider its decision to remove federal protections for the animal daniel creating reports the board's vote goes against the wisconsin. Dnr's recommendation to set the harvest at one hundred thirty wolves state. Wildlife managers supported a conservative harvest due to uncertainty over the populations response to the february wolf hunt state licensed hunters harvested nearly double their allotted quota killing two hundred eighteen wolves and less than seventy two hours. John johnson senior is president of the lack of flambeau band of lake superior chippewa. He told the board that tribes view the wolf. As a brother adding their fates are intertwined. Six people lived in existence with wolves for longer than europeans walk. North america the main gun. We know respect and understand seems to be a different animal than the wolf that so many others despise johnson also chairs the voigt intertribal task force which represents a jib way tribes. The task force has called on the us. Fish and wildlife service to reconsider the wolf's delisting due to wisconsin systemic failures to manage wolves and prevent over harvest for national native news. I'm daniel catering

Wisconsin Department Of Natura Wisconsin Fish And Wildlife Service Flambeau Band Of Lake Superior DNR John Johnson Voigt Intertribal Task Force North America Johnson United States Daniel Catering
New Review to Give a Second Chance at Medals of Honor for Black, Native American Vets

Native America Calling

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

New Review to Give a Second Chance at Medals of Honor for Black, Native American Vets

"The us military will review whether some awards to black native american veterans should be upgraded to the medal of honor. Defense secretary lloyd austin wrote in an august second memo that the review will cover black native american veterans of the korean and vietnam wars as well as native americans who fought in world war two. The army navy conducted similar views for black world. War two veterans. The medal of honor is the highest award for valor in combat in. Release to defense department said that the review will make sure that veterans who served at a time of widespread. Racial discrimination receive equal opportunities for their valor to be recognized.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin Army Navy Vietnam United States Defense Department
Bryan Newland Snags Senate Approval for Indian Affairs Role

Native America Calling

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Bryan Newland Snags Senate Approval for Indian Affairs Role

"On saturday the. Us senate confirmed the nomination of brian. Newlyn to assistant secretary of indian affairs. New england is a former president of the bay mills indian community based on michigan's upper peninsula. A major step. Recently in advancing the may t- people's of manitoba right to self-government is dan carpenter Reports the provinces mateen federation signed a recognition and implementation agreement the deal recognizes the matey of manitoba people's right to self government it also recognizes the federation's authority over citizenship leadership selection elections and the running of their government on behalf of the matey of manitoba. It's a step that lays out what happens next to recognize the f. As an indigenous government under canadian law david charter on the president of the says justices now being achieved. And it's something people have fought for. We've always been a government and no one will ever take that from us. We are the only truly recognize government province-wide in this country of canada. That is a powerful statement being made by canada. This is a legal legitimate document. And i hope. I hope that every party listening odor i ask you now. If you're going to challenge agreement challenge it now but not all are as satisfied as chartrand. The assembly of manitoba chief says ottawa did not consider the implications to the inherent and treaty rights of first nations as the original treaty partners of the crown. They argue first nations. Have yet to be given the right to self-governance chief. Arlen duma says canada's now clearly signaled it prioritizes the may t- over first nations people who claim rights and land that have existed long before the may t- came to be for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Manitoba Bay Mills Indian Community Dan Carpenter Mateen Federation Newlyn David Charter Upper Peninsula New England Senate Brian Michigan Chartrand Canada Assembly Of Manitoba United States Arlen Duma Ottawa
Canada, First Nations Reach $8B Settlement Agreement Over Drinking Water Advisories

Native America Calling

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Canada, First Nations Reach $8B Settlement Agreement Over Drinking Water Advisories

"The canadian government has reached an agreement in principle with the first nations to settle to class action lawsuits over drinking water advisories as dan carpenter reports. More than one hundred forty thousand people could be compensated. If the court approves the settlement. The proposed agreement is worth nearly eight billion dollars. One and a half billion would be direct compensation to people who have not had access to clean drinking water. There would also be money for the creation of a four hundred million dollar first nations economic and cultural restoration fund to first nations launched. A class action lawsuits against wall over the lack of safe drinking water in their communities. Mark miller is canada's indigenous services minister as well as forward commitment to support reliable access to safe drinking water on razor with six billion dollars in targeted supports including capital at operations and maintenance and finally the modernization of canada's first nations drinking water legislation the canadian government of prime minister justin trudeau had pledged in two thousand and fifteen to lift all drinking water advisories in first nations communities by march of this year. One hundred and eight advisories have been lifted. Fifty-one remain in effect. Most of them in ontario miller says the agreement in principle brings the parties. a step. Closer to reconciling a long history and it can be celebrated as a step in the right direction toward achieving the goal of clean water for all for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Canadian Government Dan Carpenter Mark Miller Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Canada Ontario Miller
Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

Native America Calling

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

"The royal canadian mounted police has confirmed. They have been investigating allegations of sexual abuse at a former residential school in manitoba as dan carpenter chuck reports. The investigation has been ongoing for more than a decade. The large-scale criminal investigation was launched in two thousand eleven into allegations of sexual abuse at the ford alexander. Residential school officers traveled to ottawa to review archives of the school and to the manitoba archives. For historical information they ended up interviewing more than seven hundred people across america in the search for potential victims or witnesses since then rcmp officers have compiled a total of seventy five victim and witness statements. Here's dan vandal. The federal minister of northern affairs. The i think the fact that there's an ongoing investigation is Is something that that is is is justified. And we know that there were crimes committed the ford alexander residential school operated from nineteen zero five to one thousand nine hundred seventy it was built on the ford alexander reserve which is now the sad king i nation last week. The first nation began searching the former school site for any unmarked graves. Police say they will not be. Providing any further information about their investigation meanwhile rcmp in saskatchewan of opened an investigation into a death that is alleged to have taken place at a children's home which was not recognized as a residential school but which housed former matey and first nation students for national native news. I'm dan carpenter took

Rcmp Dan Carpenter Chuck Manitoba Alexander Dan Vandal Ford Ottawa America Saskatchewan Dan Carpenter
Mary Simon Officially Becomes Canada's First Inuk Governor General

Native America Calling

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Mary Simon Officially Becomes Canada's First Inuk Governor General

"Mary. Simon has become the first indigenous leader to be sworn in as canada's governor general as dan carpenter reports. A ceremony took place in ottawa on monday. The seventy three year old. Simon of prominent inuk leader and former ambassador has held several key roles in promoting inuit culture. She has also been a social environmental and human rights advocate and negotiator. She knob becomes canada's thirtieth governor-general representing queen elizabeth as head of state is of enormous significance to me thirty nine years ago. When this was the government conference centre. I worked with other indigenous leaders and first ministers to have. Our rights affirmed in the constitution of canada. That moment made this possible in her. First comments as governor general. Simon talked about reconciliation for canada's indigenous. People the urgent crisis of climate change in its impacts and pledged to be an advocate for equality and mental health. She said she would strive to hold together. The tension of the past with the promise of the future in a wise and thoughtful way prime minister justin trudeau said he expects simon to use her unique experience and perspective to help steer canada's future. This is a big place. This is a diverse place and so we need people like ms sign because we need people who build bridges and bring us together. Simon also becomes the commander of canada's armed forces will grant royal assent so bills can become law. She will also play a key role in minority governments when it comes to issues of confidence and the calling of elections. She is expected to serve for five years for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Simon Canada Dan Carpenter Ottawa Queen Elizabeth Justin Trudeau Mary
Saskatoon Preschool Plans Cause Controversy

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Saskatoon Preschool Plans Cause Controversy

"According to the saskatoon starphoenix a community association. Saskatoon has decided. It's not really cool with a proposed preschool To be owned and operated By the saskatoon travel council in their neighborhood. It's it's part of the tribal council aboriginal headstart program for indigenous children. The idea is to have a first nations based curriculum and that the preschool is expected to accommodate forty kits bracha. What's your understanding of what their beef is with. Having these these kitties plan their hood. Yeah i mean The reasons they're giving public and most of the people who apparently have raised concerns are not willing to come out publicly with their with their reasons for opposing development. One woman was willing to go on camera and she claimed she loves kids. Works with kids. But she thinks it's too dangerous to have them on that property and she gave the example of a kid running out onto the road. Which of course could happen anywhere so it. It seems that some of the concern here is as not being openly stated and certainly there. There's accusations that have gone out that if this were just a any kind of preschool. There wouldn't be the same resistance but because it's a first nations led initiative and an average head start program would be located there that that's actually with generating the the response the negative response to development and having lived in saskatchewan. That totally makes sense to me. I it doesn't surprise me at all that i've wait neighborhood would be resistant to having first nations. People have a business even preschool.

Saskatoon Starphoenix A Commun Saskatoon Travel Council Bracha Saskatoon Saskatchewan
A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

Native America Calling

01:25 min | 1 year ago

A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

"More than a century ago nearly two hundred ojibway graves were removed from the burial grounds of a lake superior tribe to make way for. Us steals plan to develop or docks that were never built now. A new effort seeks to return those lands and reburial site to the fondling band of lake. Superior chippewa danielle catering. Reports wisconsin. Point is a remote strip of land on the shore of lake superior. It marks the ancestral home of the fondling tribe whose relatives settled there as early as four hundred years ago. Seven generations were laid to rest at the wisconsin point cemetery including the communities leader chief joseph osan gave the company uprooted the dead and those still living like calling aired parents. Aired who is ninety. Seven is a direct descendant of chievo soggy. It's hallowed ground to me. We just love dead aired says. Her father would be thrilled to see. The land turned over to the tribe. They're one step closer to that goal. After the superior city council passed a resolution supporting the transfer fonda lack chairman kevin dooby says returning. The lands would provide some closure to tribal families. Remember what happened in the past. It's our laos and we have to take care of it. Continue move forward. City and tribal officials will work with wisconsin. Us senator tammy baldwin office to petition the us department of interior to place the lands in federal trust for fonda lack for national native news. i'm daniel catering.

Superior Chippewa Danielle Cat Wisconsin Point Cemetery Joseph Osan Superior City Council Wisconsin Kevin Dooby United States Fonda Senator Tammy Baldwin Us Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
Sioux Tribe Opening First Legal Marijuana Business in South Dakota

Native America Calling

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Sioux Tribe Opening First Legal Marijuana Business in South Dakota

"Legal marijuana sales are happening in south dakota's borders for the first time it's only for medical purposes and there's only one place to shop. A store operated by a tribe theft tupper of south dakota public broadcasting reports the flender santee sioux tribe is the first seller of medical marijuana in the state. Native nations cannabis is a tribal business. That began sales this month of voter-approved law legalizing medical marijuana took effect july. First alex cheddar is one of the first to customers. He drove to flounder forty miles from his home. In sioux falls. I came here to get some medical marijuana. I exercise my rights. Nobody else in the state is selling medical marijuana. That's because the state health department is not ready to start issuing medical marijuana cards yet. The tribe has its own sovereign. Government doesn't have to wait for the state so it prepared to open immediately. When the new law took effect era cagan is the ceo of native nations cannabis. We've had more patients than expected. I think it's been a huge success for not only the trial. But also the state of south dakota I'm glad that we're open. The tribe requires patients to have a valid doctor's recommendation. Hagan says the tribe also accepts licenses from other states that have medical marijuana programs. We've been seeing a wide variety Tribal members non tribal members age group. Non-tribal dispensaries can sell medical marijuana. Once the state health department starts issuing licenses medical cards the department will announce a process for that by the end of october for national native news. I'm seth tupper.

South Dakota Flender Santee Sioux Tribe Alex Cheddar Cagan Native Nations Cannabis Sioux Falls Hagan Seth Tupper
Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

Native America Calling

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

"The rosebud sioux tribe in south dakota welcomed home the remains of children who died more than one hundred years ago at the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania native youth and their mentors repatriated the remains from carlisle last week and escorted them home. A four hour. Service was streamed online saturday where people gathered at the tribes college quilts photographs and other items line. The front of the gym for each of the nine children brought home. The service included speakers songs an honoring before the remains were escorted out to the burial site by native youth veterans and the community. They were placed in graves in buffalo robes and buried on the rosebud reservation.

Carlisle Indian School South Dakota Carlisle Pennsylvania Buffalo Rosebud
More Unmarked Graves Likely at Former Residential School Site

Native America Calling

01:31 min | 1 year ago

More Unmarked Graves Likely at Former Residential School Site

"Discovery of unmarked graves near a side of a former indian residential school in british columbia. A local first nation says it has found more than one hundred and sixty undocumented unmarked graves down carpet chuck reports the discovery on lockett island off. The coast of vancouver island was confirmed by the chief of the tribe. Joan brown the island is small. One was once home to the cooper island industrial school. It was run by the roman catholic church from eighteen. Ninety to nineteen seventy five in a statement brown said we understand that many of our brothers and sisters from our neighboring communities attended the cooper island industrial school we also recognized with a tremendous amount of grief and loss that too many did not return home cynthia. Wesley s coma is with the national center for truth and reconciliation. She says she's not surprised. By this discovery. We have been talking about this for decades and many of these survivors has said repeatedly that their children that were buried that were killed or died of various things and they knew that they were there. Nothing unfortunate thing was that people didn't believe that an hour Evidence that in fact this happens. The penalty at nation is hosting to healing sessions on the island in the weeks ahead and a march for children. One survivor of the school says he wants the provincial and canadian governments to step up to help indigenous people still reeling from the realities of the residential schools for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Cooper Island Industrial Schoo Lockett Island Joan Brown National Center For Truth And Vancouver Island British Columbia Roman Catholic Church Chuck Coma Cynthia Wesley Brown Dan Carpenter
Rapid City Boarding School Continues Unidentified Bodies Project

Native America Calling

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Rapid City Boarding School Continues Unidentified Bodies Project

"Work continues on a boarding school project in rapid city. South dakota as discoveries are made of burial sites at former residential schools in canada. Mike mohan reports almost a decade ago. Volunteer driven effort was launched to verify details about native children buried at a former federal boarding school. On rapid city's westside that research pave the way for an historic agreement with the city to establish parcels of land for native purposes project volunteer valerie. A big eagle says news out of canada and the remains of two hundred and fifteen children found their as an emotional element to the local effort. We tried this horror stories of children. That were you know killed and buried and we've heard this from others and it's really really challenging new details about the land. Transfer will be shared at a public meeting this thursday including converting some of the property into a native american community center that follows a resolution approved by the city council. Last fall acknowledging that tribes were never given a portion of the land along after the school closed. fellow project. Volunteer eric zimmer notes. The non native population can share in this experience as well what we're talking about doing. This undertaking work that sort of raises the quality of life for everyone in the community through a long careful deliberate process of trying to understand and respond to the more challenging. Parts of our history in volunteers were recently recognized for their work with an honorable mention in the outstanding public. History project award issued annually by the national council on public history. That was mike

Mike Mohan Rapid City Canada South Dakota Valerie Eric Zimmer City Council National Council On Public His Mike
Pope Will Meet With Indigenous Leaders About Canada's Residential Schools

Native America Calling

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Pope Will Meet With Indigenous Leaders About Canada's Residential Schools

"Canada's assembly of first nations will join may t- and inuit leaders on a trip to the vatican in december to ask for an apology from the pope for the catholic church's role in the residential school system. But as dan carpenter chuck reports the head of the af en says there are no guarantees. They will be successful in getting that apology in his final report released in two thousand and fifty the truth. Reconciliation commission called for the pope to come to canada to personally apologize to the survivors and their families for the abuses indigenous children faced in the residential school system. The anger over the lack of an apology has been heightened by the recent discoveries in british columbia and saskatchewan of hundreds of unmarked graves on the sites of former residential schools. Now assembly of first nations and inuit leaders will make the trip to rome in late december to ask for that apology. Here's perry bell guard the national chief of the a. f. n. the meetings been confirmed at the vatican's or we're going to take that meeting and then as well at that time. Take the opportunity to invite his holiness back to canada. At some point in the future and again there are no guarantees of any kind of apology or anything coming forward. There's no guarantee that he'll even come back to canada but we have to make the attempt bell guard. Says he is optimistic. He says the canadian government and the roman catholic church complicit in the operation of the residential schools. They were funded by the government and run by the churches about one hundred. Fifty thousand native. Children were forced to attend the schools from the late. Eighteen hundreds to nineteen ninety-six. Thousands were abused is not clear. How many died of neglect and abuse. The estimates range from just over four thousand to as many as fifteen thousand the three other churches involved in running the schools be anglican presbyterian and the united have apologized. The catholic church still has not for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Assembly Of First Nations Dan Carpenter Chuck Reconciliation Commission Canada Roman Catholic Church Perry Bell Vatican Canadian Government Saskatchewan British Columbia Rome United Dan Carpenter
Ceremony Held in Support of Remove the Stain Act

Native America Calling

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Ceremony Held in Support of Remove the Stain Act

"Descendants of the wounded knee massacre tribal leaders members of the national buffalo soldiers association and some members of congress took part in a recent ceremony in washington. Dc descendants of buffalo soldiers. African american cavalry presented a proclamation showing their support for the remove the stain act legislation to revoke medals of honor awarded to soldiers for their participation in the eighteen. Ninety massacre of lakota people on the pine ridge reservation in south dakota buffalo soldiers association members touched on reconciliation and acknowledging past wrongs. Tara cooks let this be the first step in honoring the commonality that unites us rather than the fear which divides us we march together not to force a perfect helium but to achieve the promise of a less imperfect one manny iron. Hawk is a descendant of the wounded knee massacre. We have to have healing. We need fuelling one hundred thirty years. We carried it from generation to generation. My mother read. The store tells the story if she cries. And so i said some day it needs to stop and with the help of our all of our allies than our brothers here. We have hope hope for children and grand jury to continue and you remember what happened in wounded knee

National Buffalo Soldiers Asso African American Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers Association Buffalo Congress South Dakota Washington Tara Hawk
Manitoba Moose Hunt Divides Opinion

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Manitoba Moose Hunt Divides Opinion

"Begin in western manitoba more specifically the region of duck mountain site of an otherwise illegal. Moose hunt led by derek deepak neck grand chief of the assembly of manitoba chiefs now. According to a report from the winnipeg sun last month's traditional hunt negotiated with and sanctioned by the manitoba government involve the harvesting of alone. Bull moose. Now the thing is the region's moose. Population is said to be dangerously depleted by as much as ninety percent so perhaps comes as no surprise that the hunt as apparently upset non indigenous hunters in the province in particular members of the manitoba wildlife federation. Indeed the federation's managing director felt this act quote. Antagonize people at a time when we need people to come together

Duck Mountain Derek Deepak Neck Assembly Of Manitoba Chiefs Manitoba Government Winnipeg Sun Manitoba Manitoba Wildlife Federation
Priest Resigns After Comments About 'Good Done' by Catholic Church on Residential Schools

Native America Calling

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Priest Resigns After Comments About 'Good Done' by Catholic Church on Residential Schools

"A catholic priest and ontario has resigned over comments. He made about the good done in residential schools as dan carbon chuck reports the archdiocese of toronto apologized for the remarks. Who in keenan was the pastor of the merciful redeemer parish in mississauga just west of toronto. He was criticized in june for a sermon in which he talked about canada's residential school system. Part of keenan sermon was posted online. Now i presumed that the same would thank the church for the good that was done in those schools but of course that question was never asked and in fact. We're not allowed even to say that good was done in those schools. Those comments were widely criticized. Here's mississauga mayor. Bonnie crombie his comments show a fundamental misunderstanding of one of the core tragedies of the residential school system in canada. The children were forcibly separated from their parents for the first time. We are truly confronting our history and learning the truth about what really happened. Who statement keenan apologized and acknowledge the pain and anger which has been magnified by his comments. He also pledged to do better. He also said as a catholic priest. He does not condone the residential school system and he regrets deeply that those schools existed cardinal thomas collins of the archdiocese of toronto accepted. Keenan's resignation keenan is now on an indefinite leave of absence for national native news. I'm dan carpenter

Keenan Dan Carbon Chuck Mississauga Toronto Bonnie Crombie Ontario Canada Cardinal Thomas Collins Dan Carpenter
Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

Native America Calling

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

"Another grim discovery in british columbia the remains of one hundred and eighty two bodies near a former indian residential school. As dan carpenter reports the find was made using ground penetrating radar. The lower kootenai band says the remains were found in unmarked graves near the site of the former saint. Eugene's mission school near cranbrook. The school run by the catholic church operated from nineteen twelve to the nineteen seventies about one hundred members of the kootenai band attended the school. Chief jason lewis says. The ben's leaders met with survivors of the school in the community before making the announcement and louis added his voice to the growing calls for the catholic church to be held accountable for running the schools. The nazis were held accountable for their war crimes. And i see no difference in locating the priests and and the brothers that are responsible to be held accountable for their arts. In this attempt of genocide on indigenous people the announcement comes just a month after another british columbia. First nation found the remains of two hundred and fifteen children buried on the site of a former residential school near kamloops and the remains of seven hundred fifty. One bodies were found near a former residential school in saskatchewan. Other native leaders. Say the need for mental. Health services for survivors will increase as more graves discovered near former residential schools across canada for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Dan Carpenter Chief Jason Lewis Catholic Church British Columbia Cranbrook Eugene BEN Louis Kamloops Saskatchewan Canada
What Stories Should We Tell on Canada Day?

The Big Story

01:28 min | 1 year ago

What Stories Should We Tell on Canada Day?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story i today. We welcome either. Ju an associate fellow at the yellow head institute. Eva is initially bakeware from desch. Kenzi chippewas of the thames. First nation. you've let's just start with this. What if anything has candida day historically meant to you well. It's always been a day of celebration for a settler colonial state that has never included me or my community or indigenous peoples more. Broadly and i've never celebrated canada day. So i was raised by my parents as inish knob. A on. my mother's side in an ongoing way on my father's side and my dad was very adamant that we are not citizens of the state but in fact were members of our pre existing nations and so things can today was not really in our family celebrations. And it actually wasn't until nineteen fifty that first nations people were even granted canadian citizenship. So candidate hasn't really ever been Something that i don't think anyway in my immediate family and circle has been celebrated and canadian citizenship by need to remind folks is not actually something that our leaders even desired at the time. It was something that was a. It was an involuntary enfranchisement to the state because our leaders had always asserted that we are nations.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Yellow Head Institute Desch Kenzi Chippewas JU EVA Canada