Mindfulness

Sit back, relax and listen to the latest in mindfulness, awareness, and compassion in all aspects of life. Sourced from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

Tara Brach

04:23 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

"In these heart practices, we're really moving from this realm of thinking. Conceptual to the heart and keeping the heart in the body at the center of awareness as a way of homecoming. It has to be an aesthetic. This particular practice today will be really emphasizing goodness. Because of our negativity bias, we don't really immerse and take in and sense the feeling of what it's like to observe goodness in ourselves or others. And with ourselves we rarely acknowledge it, we're so organized around what's wrong. So that's where we'll pay attention today. Rumi says whenever some kindness comes to you, turn that way toward the source of kindness. So we'll be looking for the source of loving and turning in that direction. Finding a posture that allows you to be alert sitting upright and also at ease. This is a way of initially collecting your attention. You might take a nice full deep in breath. And then a slow out breath slow enough so you can feel the sensations leaving the nostrils. And then another nice long deep in breath. Slow out breath, letting go. Letting go. One more time, deep full in breath. And slow out, breath. Relaxing outward. Letting the breath resume, and it's natural rhythm. Noticing the quality of presence. It's right here. From that space of presence sensing your most sincere intention. For this practice. As a way of creating a receptivity and openness in the body, I'd like to do a classical pre meta practice in a way it's a body meta practice of the smile down. Begin by a great smile spreading through the sky. Just vast that great sky that's out there just spreading through it. The uplift of a smile. You can imagine the mind and the sky emerging so that the mind is filled with that uplift curve, openness of a smile. Letting the smile spread through the eyes, lifting the outer corners of the eyes. Softening the eyes. Letting the brow be smooth. Sensing the mouth, slight smile. Just directly helps to quiet the

Rumi
A highlight from 401: How to Embrace the Anti-Diet | Christy Harrison

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:53 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 401: How to Embrace the Anti-Diet | Christy Harrison

"This is the 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey gang, one of the things that happens to a lot of people when they start meditating, and it definitely happened to me. Is that you might become more aware of your thoughts. And as you become more aware of your thoughts, you may notice that many of them are venomously self critical. You might notice this background swirl of judgments and worries and regrets that can make your life a lot more miserable than it has to be. Again, I'm speaking from genuine personal experience here. Oftentimes, some of the most pernicious and most harmful thoughts revolve around our relationship to food and our bodies. Longtime listeners may have heard me say this before and I think this is something more men should say out loud. But I often find myself in spirals of self laceration when I walk past a reflective surface, especially if I'm wearing a bathing suit, for example. The visible abs I prided myself on back in my 30s or not here anymore and the thoughts that follow this observation can be pretty nasty. And my inner weather can have outer consequences. Maybe I start fanatically counting my calories or maybe I'm so caught up in obsessing over food that I'm barely president mealtime or maybe I get so into the habit of beating myself up that I extend that aggression to other people in my orbit. So all that is the bad news. The good news is that there's a way out of this, at least in my experience. Hence the two part series we're doing on the show this week, which we're calling the anti diet series. This is episode two, by the way, if you haven't heard the first episode with the actress Jameela Jamil, I highly recommend you check it out because she's amazing. Today's guest argues that the dysregulation I just described inside my own head isn't just common, it lives in just about all of us. But also that it has a common source, which she calls diet culture. What's more, she says there's another better way to interact with our food. It's called intuitive eating. I should say this is something I've been practicing personally for a couple of years now, and to use and overused phrase, it has genuinely changed my life. My guest today is Christie Harrison. She's an anti diet registered dietitian and nutritionist, a certified intuitive eating counselor and a certified eating disorder specialist who has struggled with disordered eating herself. She's come out the other side of it, and she's written a book called anti diet, and today she's here to talk about how to transform your relationship with food and your body. In this interview, we talk about Christie's personal experience with eating disorders. The problem with diet culture, the deep historical roots of diet culture, the scientific evidence against dieting and then the principles of intuitive eating. Just a few notes before we go for it. This conversation, as you might imagine, touches on some sensitive topics, such as eating disorders, body image. Some of these issues may carry an emotional charge for some listeners, so just a heads up on that. On an audio tip, you may also hear a tiny bit of airplane noise in the distant background at certain moments that's what happens when you record remotely during a pandemic. Also, you may notice that Christie's voice at times is a tiny bit breathy. That's not because she's nervous, it's because she was very pregnant when we recorded this. By the way, if you like what you hear today, I've got another bit of good news. We've tapped Christie to be the instructor in our brand new anti diet challenge over on the 10% happier app. In this 7 day challenge, we're gonna help you build a better relationship with food and your body. The approach is back by science and supercharged with meditation. And the challenge Christina and I are going to talk through the principles of intuitive eating in a series of short videos and then after the video is complete, Christie will lead you in a guided audio meditation to actually kind of pound the lessons of intuitive eating into your neurons.

Dan Harris Jameela Jamil Christie Harrison Christie Christina
A highlight from Daryl Davis - Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

07:24 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Daryl Davis - Healing Hate with Friendship

"I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how two disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis, and he's a black man who is convinced over 200 Ku Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today we're going to hear Daryl's story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight and bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together, learn from one other, become friends heal and grow. Welcome, Daryl. Thank you, Ariel. It's a real pleasure to be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being. Sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. Oh, it's my pleasure and I hope your listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the backstory to how and why you were able to penetrate the clan? Okay, I'm age 62 currently. And as a child, my parents were in the U.S. foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three, and on through elementary school, traveling abroad, living in various foreign countries. You go to a country for two years, then you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years. While overseas, my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries out of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigerian Italian Russian Japanese French, you name it if they had an embassy there. I was in school with their kids. And to me, that was the norm. That was my first exposure to school. And so when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools or black and white schools, meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones. What year was this? Well, I left Chicago shortly after I was born. But we would come back and we would be like in Washington, D.C. or we'd be in Massachusetts, different places for a short time before being reassigned. Every other two years. So I was back. I know I was back for part of the second grade. I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in 6th grade, and I was back here in 8th grade. When I would come back to schools were either all black or black and white, meaning still segregated or nearly integrated. And there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade, 1968. I was ten years old. And I was one of two black children in the entire school. Myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently all of my Friends were white. And many of my male friends were members of the local cub scout group. And they invited me to join, which I did. And during a march we had from Lexington to Concorde to commemorate the riot of Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with sort of pop bottles and cans and Ross and Joseph debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk. Not everybody. Most of those people were cheering us and waving. And all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe 5 people off to my right. I remember there being a couple of kids, perhaps a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who were throwing things. And when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this, my first thought was, oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was. Because I had never been through that kind of thing before. And it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my club leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized then that I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection. And I asked him, I said, why am I being here? Why are they doing this? I didn't do anything. And all they would do was kind of shush me and rush them along, telling me everything would be okay, just keep moving. And so they never answered the question. At the end of the day, when I returned home, my mother and father who were not at the parade were fixed me up cleaning me up putting band aids on me and asked me, how do I fall down and get all scraped up? I told them I didn't fall down until the what had happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism. They explained what racism was to me. And my ten year old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever. I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point. And none of them, whether they were my fellow Americans, my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And the issue that not all white people do this, but there is an element of some they do. And I just could not wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them. Well, about almost two months later, that same year, 1968, on April the fourth, Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word that I had learned called racism. So then I understood that this phenomenon does exist. But I did not understand why. Why are people raise this? What makes them that way? So I formed a question in my mind at that age, which was how can you hate me when you don't even know me? And now, for 52 years since then, I've been looking for the answer to that question. So how better would you get an answer and who better to go to to get it from, then somebody who would go so far as to join an organization whose whole premise has been now for a 155 years practicing hating people who don't look like them or who do not believe as they believe. So I began to question Klan members and clan leaders to get the answer to this question. And as a result, not only did I get some answers, but I also changed some minds along the way. Now, I don't like to say that I converted them what I want to say is that I was the impetus for them to rethink their ideology. And then they would make the change or make the conversion themselves. I planted the seed. It's amazing. Can you tell us some of the stories? I know I've heard some of them before and they're extraordinary. Top clan members that became like family to you. Sure, absolutely. The first leader that I interviewed was a grand dragon, which means a state leader. What you and I would call a governor, and he would later the one to become an imperial wizard, which means national leader.

Daryl Davis Daryl U.S. Foreign Service Washington, D.C. Ariel Paul Revere Massachusetts Lexington Chicago Ross Joseph Aids Martin Luther King
A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Two Types of Desire

The Angry Therapist Podcast

01:16 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Two Types of Desire

"Hi, my name is John Kim. I'm a therapist who went through his own rebirth many years ago, and I've been documenting my journey ever since sharing my life lessons and revelations. I believe in casual over Pinnacle with you instead of at you. I come unrehearsed on purpose because self help doesn't have to be so complicated. Hey, I want to tell you about the lab. If you haven't heard, it is wellness. Anywhere you go, you can listen to it like a podcast. They're basically live zoom classes, but you could listen to them on a run, or you could turn the camera on and engage with them. We have a thriving community of like minded people trying to live better lives and it's been amazing. Not only do we have the foundational classes like codependency and trauma and relationships and all that. But we also have a lot of fun classes because it's so hard to make friends as adults, right? So we have Terry card readings, we have so shower. We have astrology readings. We're turning wellness into a lifestyle. We're also going to run a retreat soon. So come and hang out with us, come ride with us. Go to the website to get into the lab and then go download the app. We have a brand new app out with tons of audio.

John Kim Terry
A highlight from 400: Jameela Jamil on Mental Self-Defense

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:04 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 400: Jameela Jamil on Mental Self-Defense

"That. Feels like we started this thing just yesterday. Anyway, thanks for supporting the show, and thanks to all the incredible people who have worked so hard on this show. This episode number 400 is a doozy. Let me just step back for a second before I tell you about our guest. As everybody knows, the holidays are here and as everybody I believe knows this season can bring up a whole cornucopia of complex psychological issues. One of the biggies, here is food and how we feel about our bodies. Many of us can get super obsessive about food and body issues at any time, but especially so during the holidays. Pretty much every woman I know will relate to this immediately, but a quick note to my male listeners. Dude, you might think you're immune to this stuff, and maybe you are, if so, God bless. But I urge you to look closely at the noise inside your dome. How much time do you spend perseverating about what you eat? How much you eat and how you look as compared to your friendly neighborhood Instagram influencer. Is it possible that turning down the volume on food slash body preoccupation, self assessment and self criticism would make you happier and healthier and free up limited bandwidth to focus on something that is perhaps more constructive? We're launching a two part series today, which we are calling the anti diet series on Wednesday. We're going to be talking to an expert in something called intuitive eating, which has had a huge impact on me. Today though, our guest is Jameela Jamil and actor and activist who you may have seen on such shows as the good place, the misery index and legendary. As you're about to hear she has opinions, strong opinions, which she will express with a lot of conviction and humor and profanity. Outside of her acting, jameela is known for launching a movement and a platform called eye Wei. That's W ei, GH way, not W ay way. So I weigh is the name of her organization. And she's also the host of the I weigh podcast, where she talks to everybody from Reese Witherspoon to Vivek Murthy, the U.S. Surgeon General to Gloria Steinem. In today's conversation, jameela and I talk about her struggles with weight, fatphobia, and eating disorders since childhood. We talk about how to develop what she calls mental self defense and how to be ruthless and you'll hear she is ruthless when it comes to personal boundaries. We also talk about the difference between body positivity and body neutrality, how she handles the scrutiny and toxicity of social media and how men can play a positive role in a world with profound double standards when it comes to looks. Before we dive in just a quick content warning in this interview we touch on the topics of suicide eating disorders and sexuality, so just a heads up on that. Also, as I said, there's a lot of cursing. We bleep all of it, but never have we had to use so many bleeps. It's pretty hilarious, actually. And while the content is serious, this wearing is pretty hilarious. Anyway, we've made it child proof in case you've got a kid in the car or nearby, whatever. One of the things to say before we dive in, this is an item of business, in conjunction with the anti diet series right here on the podcast, we are launching an anti diet challenge over on the 10% happier app. In the challenge we're going to give you an introduction to intuitive eating, which I mentioned earlier. By way of background here, my own relationship with food and body image, which, well, luckily has not been dangerously bad, in any way, has often been, you know, more than a little bit fraught. For years, I would watch my diet like a hawk, counting my macros, pushing myself at the gym, only to get to the end of a long day and hoes an entire sleeve of Oreos. A lot of this was driven by the fact that I'm on TV, but I think it's very common among all humans and more common than it is commonly admitted among men. As I got older and my body started to change, I also developed a whole host of subtle, but pretty pernicious mental habits that would crop up every time I passed a reflective surface. What finally broke me out of this vicious cycle with something I first learned right here on the show. Intuitive eating. It's an evidence based approach to food that flies in the face of every diet I've ever heard of. That's why we've been calling it the anti diet. In the 7 day anti diet challenge over on the app, we're gonna help you build a better relationship with food, better relationship with your body. This approach, as I've said, is backed by science and in classic TPH fashion. It is supercharged by meditation. In the anti diet challenge, we're going to be working with a phenomenal anti diet registered dietitian and nutritionist by the name of Christy Harrison. She's actually our guest on the podcast on Wednesday. She and I will talk through the principles of intuitive eating in short videos. And then when the video is done, it will roll directly into a guided audio

Jameela Jameela Jamil Vivek Murthy Gloria Steinem Reese Witherspoon U.S. Christy Harrison
A highlight from My First EFT Session

The Angry Therapist Podcast

08:31 min | Last week

A highlight from My First EFT Session

"It's case sensitive, so all lower case, one word live better. And I will see you in the lab. All right, so Sheila, welcome. Hi. Hi, I'm actually super excited about what we're going to talk about today because I don't know a lot about Tapping, I know about the other thing we're going to talk about, which is anger. But let's talk about its EFT, right? Yes, it stands for emotional freedom technique. Yes, before we begin, tell us a little bit about yourself. Okay, well, I'll tell you about the part that's related to EFT. Yeah. So I got into doing EFT way back when I was a graphic designer because I was working. I was doing remote graphic design work for a lady in the Houston Texas. And I started listening to what she was talking about, and I was looking at the issues that she was clearing. And I thought, wow, this is a really diverse range of issues to tackle with one technique. And I was, you know, 30 years old at the time. It was like 21 years ago. And I was a single parent of two kids. My oldest son had Asperger's on the autism spectrum. And I always felt like there was a strategy that I could learn that would be more helpful than just medicating him. Yeah and I got, I started trading instead of her paying me to do the graphic design. I started trading services with her. So I was doing graphic design and exchange for EFT Sessions. And I was blown away at how well it works. How quickly and thoroughly and deeply reprogrammed I was. And so how does it work? Why do you think it worked as far as far as the science behind this? So it uses the same energy meridians that you would use for acupuncture accumulation for one thing. And you're Tapping on the ends of those energy meridians. So it's almost like, you know, you put in a battery into your remote control, but you put it in reverse. And through the, you know, it's the same energy. It's just not hitting the right. You know, the energy is not flowing. Yeah. We flip that battery, all of a sudden the energy is flowing, positive to negative all the way around. This sounds like my life, the battery being reversed and just nothing's connecting. Nothing is flowing. So this is going to be my first time doing this with you, which I'm super excited about. And also now you run classes in the lab and this is one of your classes. Yeah. And I try and pick things that are sort of universal. I mean, we all were all human will. Things. But, you know, it was when you posted your real about anger. Yeah. You were talking about anger and powerlessness and acceptance. And so the other component of EFT is that it uses neural linguistic programming. Right. NLP. And Tony Robbins is kind of made that famous, correct? Yeah, and I mean lots of people use it in different ways and sometimes in manipulative ways. And advertising uses it and things like that. But it's a really good way of anchoring so EFT with NLP combined. It anchors certain concepts into the body. And so it also relies on that mind body connection. Right. Somatic component as well. We begin to realize that universally people feel tension and pressure and burdens up over their shoulders or their gut feeling, every culture says it, but very few use it. So your gut, you know, that gut instinct that feeling is actually your solar plexus. And oh, that's interesting. Yeah, I carry everything in my shoulders. That's where all my stress is. There you go. You know, you feel burdens by things. So what was it about that video on anger, you know, for that day, my definition of banker, what about anger? Did you did it move you? And you're like, oh, I need to have this conversation. Well, I run into people not being able to label their emotions. So sometimes repressed anger, what I call latent anger. You know, people know when they're going yelling at somebody and they're like, you know, frustrated and angry and it comes out. They're really able to identify that. They're not so easily able to identify, you know, the fact that they've broken out in hive. Right. Or they've got eczema all over their body. So that latent anger being able to identify some of our emotions when they're not raging. Yeah. Builds up and it takes a toll on people physically. It manifests physically. Yeah. All right. Cool. So what do you want to do? How do you want to do this? I was thinking, you know, dive in cold. I'll show you how it works and we'll dive in completely cold on it. Let's do it the issue. All right. Dealing with anger. So just to give you a little background, so on your on your pectoral muscles, there's these sore spots. So see if you can find them. So, right? Right in the middle of your pectoral muscle. So those are points of lymphatic drainage. And you don't want to dig too deeply there. You want to just sort of gently massage them as we say this setup phrase. And so this was another thing that you said in your video. You talked about acceptance. So then he word that we use in EFT all the time. Am I doing circular motions? Yeah. Okay. Okay. If you're listening to this on my podcast, I am with my hands rubbing the top of my chest. If you're watching this and you just came in, it might look a little strange. Yeah. Okay. There we go. So we always sandwich whatever the issue is with. So let's say the issue was anger. So experiencing anger or even latent anger, we would say, even though these repeat after me even though, I experience all forms of anger. I experience all forms of anger. Some are really obvious. Some are really obvious. When I'm yelling in traffic, when I'm yelling in traffic. Stomping my feet. Stomping my feet. Shouting, shouting. Swearing. Swearing. Being short with people. Being short with people. Being frustrated with myself. Being frustrated with myself. Those are all really obvious forms of anger. Those are all really obvious forms of anger. But sometimes but sometimes I like to throw myself that I'm all teaching positive. I'd like to tell myself that I'm all peachy and positive. I calm myself all these wonderful affirmations. Tell myself all these wonderful affirmations. And all kinds of havoc is going on around me. In all kinds of havoc, it's going around me. And I just pack that back there. And I just packed that back there. I carry it around and I carry it around. I carry it around. I carry it around. Can I get all this tension in my back when my shoulder?

Asperger's Sheila Tony Robbins Autism Houston Texas Eczema
A highlight from Gratitude: Entering Sacred Relationship

Tara Brach

06:17 min | Last week

A highlight from Gratitude: Entering Sacred Relationship

"Well, we. Really embrace others that have felt so different as part of our heart. You know, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity can our hearts wake up in that way. Then we think ahead and here's a big one. Which is that the number one word the Oxford dictionary has identified for its biggest use of the year. It's actually two words, climate emergency. Because usage of the year, it's in our nervous system, we know it. We know the great dis ease of the service, so then we learn this pathway to sacred relationship and act as we need to act. We don't know the answer to that. But these are the questions that come up when we think of holy days and sacred relationship. So here's where the I'm looking around. If you're not here watching, it's everybody who's gone kind of like this. And I understand because I'm feeling that also. Where the hope is is that we create our future and how we live today. Really this moment how we live this moment. And we can let these holy days and all days matter and very consciously cultivate our hearts. And tonight, I'm honor explore a key entry to that. And it's the entry of gratitude. It's really a gratitude and honoring and appreciating. And I'll start off with a quote from a great bodhisattva fairly contemporary Fred Rogers who's becoming more and more central for so many. Here's what he says. I believe that appreciation is a holy thing. That when we look for what's best in the person we happen to be with at the moment, we're doing what God does. So in loving and appreciating our neighbor, we're participating in something truly sacred. And appreciating our neighbor and appreciating each other and appreciating nature when we are feeling gratitude. We are participating in something sacred. I think that's just such a beautiful way to say it. How many of you have seen a beautiful day in the neighborhood, anybody? A few. Yeah. Yeah, it's just out. The more I read about Fred Rogers, the more truly is quite a model of presence whoever is with really truly respecting and showing up with his heart. And the reviews are interesting to me. And the reason I'm spending time on it is because it points out something. One reviewer put it this way, he said, people took to it immediately as if applying a band aid to a wounded psyche. And I was thinking about that, and what seems so important about the movie is that we love goodness. We really love goodness. And we're hurting, and I say we're grieving because our society right now feels so far from the values that matter to us, and what we're kind of riveted on often as a society. So far from the care and the presence and the respect that matters to our heart. So there's a grieving. The responses can we open up our own hearts. And let's just look at gratitude as an example, it's really helpful to begin to notice in our own lives, what stops us from feeling grateful. You know, if you ask yourself today, what stopped you from just that attitude of appreciation of appreciating who you're with at work or family or friends or the natural world around you? What stopped you? And I know for many of us, it's that we're on our way somewhere else. And we're just not really here to take in what's right here. How many of you could say that for yourself today that you're on your way somewhere else? I know I was. So okay, three construction workers are standing in a row next to traffic Karen signs. The first carrier is a big stop sign. The second car is a sign that says stop and smell the flowers carries a bunch of flowers in her hand. And the third, the sign says, okay, resume tearing through your life like a maniac. And we get it. You know, it's like we're on our way somewhere else. And the somewhere else is often in some way we're trying to get something we want. You know, we want often it's to get things done. But we also want to get things now an extreme would be reader rutner, who says, someday I want to be rich. Some people get so rich they lose all respect for humanity. That's how rich I want to get. But it's not that extreme. It's not like we're most of us are thinking on that level. But we're moving through in some way trying to get the next cup of coffee or trying to get the next bit of approval from somebody or trying to get something. Julia Child says that department stores, people often get unnecessary kitchen equipment when they were only going for men's underwear. And we know how it is. And it happens online all the time. You think you're going to one thing and you just go down rabbit hole after rabbit hole, chasing. There was a research study in 1981 and people were asked to complete the sentence. I'm glad I'm not a.

Fred Rogers Oxford Rutner Karen Julia Child
A highlight from Meditation: Energy and Source (2021-11-24)

Tara Brach

03:35 min | Last week

A highlight from Meditation: Energy and Source (2021-11-24)

"Just as a way of beginning, takes a moment to adjust if you're sitting or for some people like to do these lying down, standing, however, adjust your posture. So that you feel a sense of ease. Also alertness. And you may let your attention go inward. And for some that's closing your eyes, some might find it helpful to just lower your gauge, whatever serves you. It will begin in the simple way of breathing together. Just become aware of this body breathing, and you might lengthen or extend the in breath, perhaps to the count of 5. So you really fill the chest in the lungs. The slow out breath the same count matching the in breath and the out breath. You can feel the sensations or releasing the breath. And again, a long, slow in breath. And a slow out breath. Then again, breathing in, filling the chest and the lungs. And sense with the out breath that you're actually letting go, releasing, relaxing our. And again, breathing in. Opening, receiving. And breathing out along, slow out breath. Softening down the lens of the body as you release the breath. Now as you allow the breath to return to its natural rhythm the sense and observing of the breath. That it's possible to continue to relax with the movement of the breath. With awareness. Perhaps sensing the presence that has increased just even in a few moments. That you're more here. Now we can increase that presence further as we scan down the body, waking up in an energetic way. You might imagine and feel a smile spreading through the eyes. So the outer corners of the eyes are lifted a bit. Let that help a softening through the eyes.

A highlight from Jane Goodall  What It Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Jane Goodall What It Means to Be Human

"Several years ago, our moderated a gathering on an island off Istanbul that included the primatologist Jane Goodall. I knew about her epic early years studying chimpanzees in the wild at first without even a college degree. The science she proceeded to do also ended up shaping the self understanding of our species. She recalled modern western science to the fact that we are a part of nature, not separate from it. But what I've never gleaned from all I'd read about her across the years, yet saw powerfully when we met is how fully she had mid career given her life's work over to a new passion. Humanity had become a threat to its own kin in the natural world. With the same careful empathic eye she trained on the entire ecosystem of the Gombe forest, she began to do her part to tend to the human pain and misunderstanding that led to her beloved chimpanzees suffering. This hour, in honor of the publication of her 32nd book, we revisit the beautiful conversation I had with her in 2020. We experience the moral and spiritual convictions that have driven this extraordinary woman.

Jane Goodall Istanbul Gombe Forest
A highlight from No BS With Nicholas Gonzalez

The Angry Therapist Podcast

01:16 min | Last week

A highlight from No BS With Nicholas Gonzalez

"Hi, my name is John Kim. I'm a therapist who went through his own rebirth many years ago, and I've been documenting my journey ever since sharing my life lessons and revelations. I believe in casual over Pinnacle with you instead of at you. I come unrehearsed on purpose because self help doesn't have to be so complicated. Hey, I want to tell you about the lab. If you haven't heard, it is wellness. Anywhere you go, you can listen to it like a podcast. They're basically live zoom classes, but you could listen to them on a run, or you could turn the camera on and engage with them. We have a thriving community of like minded people trying to live better lives and it's been amazing. Not only do we have the foundational classes like codependency and trauma and relationships and all that. But we also have a lot of fun classes because it's so hard to make friends as adults, right? So we have Terry card readings, we have so shower. We have astrology readings. We're turning wellness into a lifestyle. We're also going to run a retreat soon. So come and hang out with us, come ride with us. Go to the website to get into the lab and then go download the app. We have a brand new app out with tons of audio.

John Kim Terry
A highlight from 399: How to Get Out of Your Head | Willa Blythe Baker

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:35 min | Last week

A highlight from 399: How to Get Out of Your Head | Willa Blythe Baker

"This is the 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey, hey, it is a common desire, many of us have this urge to get out of our heads to escape the internal noise, the chatter, the sterm and drawing, the sound and fury, et cetera, et cetera, you hear about it and pop songs and poetry, this urge to be blown away to transcend, but how do you actually do it? My guest today is a font of practical advice, her name is willa Blythe baker. She is the founder and spiritual director of natural Dharma fellowship in Boston, Massachusetts and its retreat center, the wonder well mountain refuge in Springfield, New Hampshire. She was authorized as a Dharma teacher and lineage holder in the kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism after 12 years of monastic training and two consecutive three year retreats as if that's not enough. She also has a doctorate from Harvard, and she is the author of a brand new book called the wakeful body, somatic, mindfulness as a path to freedom. In this conversation, we talk about what somatic mindfulness actually is. The three levels of your body, earth subtle and awareness, specific exercises for getting out of your head and crucially how to meditate without all of the effort. This is a rangy conversation. We go on all sorts of fascinating esoteric digressions, but will always guide us back to the practical stuff. Before that, one quick item of business, if you're a regular listener to this podcast, you may have noticed that we've had a lot going on over on the

Willa Blythe Baker Natural Dharma Fellowship Dan Harris Springfield New Hampshire Massachusetts Boston Harvard
A highlight from Shelly Tygielsky - How Meditation and Radical Self Care can Lead to Activism

Untangle

01:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Shelly Tygielsky - How Meditation and Radical Self Care can Lead to Activism

"People could help one another. Her organization has had more than 2 million peer to peer transactions worth over 60 million in donor recipient transactions. Her mantra, show up for yourself with radical self care and for others in any way that you can. You'll hear much more about her life and what inspired her here. Now, here's Shelley. Shelley, it's really great to have you on untangle today. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to be here. Yeah, it was really fun to read your book. I had heard about the pandemic of love, but I didn't really know all of the details that I learned from reading the book. I'm curious about what inspired you to write the book. Tell me a little bit about that. I'd been thinking about for pondering writing a book for several years and was get this failure to launch moment because I felt like have I lived enough is there something specific that I want to share with people what's it going to be about? How would this all be laid out, especially if the intent was not for it to really be memoir, if you will? So I've

Shelley
A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Love and Money

The Angry Therapist Podcast

04:25 min | Last week

A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Love and Money

"What do you think? Is that a little too abstract? Like your lunch is so bad because you're so poor that you don't want to show people what you're eating. Not so much. I mean, I don't know if I've never heard that visual used with somebody being poor. The only time I've actually ever heard that visual being used is all of my friends who are first generation who actually were embarrassed because their food was culturally ethnic. But I've never heard it and used in poor and rich, but. Watch it. I just made it, I just made it up. Yeah. Okay. Sometimes sometimes I'll stab and it just won't hit the target missed the entire thing. But you on the other hand, you grew up without money. You grew up wondering, right? Where your next meal is going to come from. Yeah, I mean, my mom busted our ass and worked hard. We were never on the street, but we definitely, for the first, I would say 12 years of my life, single mom, bartending, you know, and we bounced around a lot. We moved every year. I was very kind of aware of the anxiety around finances that wasn't really hidden from me. I'm sure mostly, you know, I don't blame my mom. She was young and she didn't have a partner, so I was kind of the stand on, I suppose. So I probably knew more than I should have. But yeah, I mean, the anxiety around food was real. And I always knew that my dad didn't pay child support and I was just always very aware of all of these things. So money has always been something that I have a very hard relationship with. Right. And so how do you think that has rippled into all your relationship? And then, of course, you know, this one. Well, I think that, you know, I can see the direct result of it in my relationships where I've always very adamant that I will pay 50%. You know, we will split everything equally. You do not take care of me. You do not pay for things for me. I'm very uncomfortable when people buy me things. You know, like Christmas gifts and stuff for one thing, but even if it starts to get a little extravagant, that still makes me uncomfortable. You know, my ex fiance actually, when I had decided that I really wanted to start, I guess pivoting and I was very interested in kind of getting into wellness. And I decided I wanted to go for my yoga teacher training. I couldn't afford it at the time. He made more money than me. Which is funny, because by the end of the relationship that flipped. But he offered to pay. It was like $1200 or something and he offered to pay for it. And I was so uncomfortable with that. And I said yes, because I couldn't do it any other way. And then I actually over the next two years secretly paid more than my share of our bills until I had paid him back. And I never even told him that I did that. It was just more because I couldn't internally sit with knowing that he paid for that. Oh, wow. That's really interesting. So he doesn't even know until this day that you gave him an extra 1200. No. No. Because I kind of like sprinkled it in over the next couple of years. And it was just like something I just wanted to do and I didn't want him to have paid for it for me. There was something about that that took away the meaning or something. But yeah, I mean, I never told him. So is that one thing that you are working toward allowing people that loving care about you to buy things for you? And also not putting the pressure on yourself to pay for half of everything. I had to, right? Because having a baby actually forced me into not being able to work for a certain amount of time. And so you're the first person in my life that I've ever begrudgingly had to allow to financially take care of me. And it's been I spent a lot of time with my therapist because I cut my therapist all the way through pregnancy. A lot of my therapy was actually around at least in the end was a lot of the anxiety that was coming up around that. So it's not easy for me, it's still hard for me that you still pay for the majority of our bills right now. And I'm still doing some work around it. I have a career coach actually now that I'm working with.

A highlight from Creating a Simple Monthly Overview

Mindful Productivity Podcast

01:09 min | Last week

A highlight from Creating a Simple Monthly Overview

"Hello, hello. You are listening to episode one 76 of the mindful productivity podcast. I'm your host Sarah stickler, and this week, I thought it would be fun to do a bit of a deep dive into one way that you can get started with monthly planning. So we're going to be actually using my mindful productivity guide, which is an undated planner and walking through this process, you do not need a copy of the planner to go through this, but if you have one, you can listen along and flip through the pages with me. But by listening to this episode, you're going to gain some insights into planning either in a new way to you or learn a great structural way to start planning if you're new to planning on paper or in general, or maybe this is just a brand new concept and hey, no judgment. We all have to start somewhere. So let's go ahead and dive into this episode. I'm really excited to talk about these components of planning with you, and I think you're going to find a lot of fun and enjoyment in this, and you're also going to feel so much better because you're going to have some structure, some organization, and a plan moving forward for the month ahead. All right, let's go ahead and dive

Sarah Stickler
A highlight from 398: The Right Kind of Suffering | Paul Bloom

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:46 min | Last week

A highlight from 398: The Right Kind of Suffering | Paul Bloom

"This is the 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. All righty, hello. Welcome to the show. To say the least suffering has some pretty negative connotations, especially in Buddhism where the whole goal is to uproot suffering. But is there a good kind of suffering? My guest today says yes, there is a kind of suffering that you choose a voluntary suffering that can make your life more meaningful and also reduce your anxiety. Paul bloom is a Professor of psychology at the university of Toronto and the Brooks and Suzanne Reagan professor emeritus of psychology at Yale University. He's the author of 6 books, the most recent of which is called the sweet spot, the pleasures of suffering and the search for meaning. In this conversation we cover why hedonism is not our natural state, why we are hard wired to worry about bad things and why that's not such a bad thing. Why paradoxically, people who strive for happiness are often the most unhappy, the difference between chosen and unchosen suffering, post traumatic growth and why it's not always true that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, benign masochism. I love that term and the blurring of pleasure and pain. Why suffering can be fun and pleasurable, the brain as a difference engine? Suffering as an escape from the self and the overlap with and distinction from meditation practices, and we dive into Paul's previous book to talk about the difference between cognitive empathy and emotional empathy. Before that, one quick item of business, if you're a regular listener to this podcast, you may have noticed that we've had a lot going on.

Paul Bloom Suzanne Reagan Dan Harris University Of Toronto Yale University Brooks Paul
A highlight from Recevoir la bonte presente (Meditation de retraite)

Tara Brach

03:14 min | Last week

A highlight from Recevoir la bonte presente (Meditation de retraite)

"Boo. Lost over pencier. Rossi said person he. Can use them. Is something. They fix your pores. Who purvey Maggie said communication at traverse? Is Santi. Like I did. The vivas did on a regime vodka. They see such salary. Said bonte so conflict or Duncan. The facade. Tell me who the saints la bonte. Also saint Simon, depreciation. Perez devoted. Observing another taton Poisson la bonte killer presence. La bonte de verte. La bonte lamour Santi en route. Always salty la bonte. A too skip was sublime presage on.

Vivas Bonte La Bonte Rossi Santi Saint Simon Maggie Duncan Saints Perez
Breakdown of Meaning and the Courage to Despair: Insights of Paul Tillich [SSL 205] - burst 2

Spark My Muse

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Breakdown of Meaning and the Courage to Despair: Insights of Paul Tillich [SSL 205] - burst 2

"Existentialism as it appeared in the twentieth century represents the most vivid and threatening meaning of existential in it the whole development comes to a point beyond which cannot go it has become a reality in all the countries of the western world it is expressed in all the realms of humans spiritual creativity it penetrates all educated classes. It is not the invention of a bohemian philosopher or of a neurotic novelist. It is not a exaggeration made for the sake of profit and fame. It is not a morbid play with negativities elements of all these have entered it but it itself is something else it is the expression of the anxiety of meaninglessness and of the attempt to take this anxiety into the courage to be as once-off

Tillich Russia Lisa United States Government CIA
Finding The Pieces of Yourself That You've Lost

Real Ass Affirmations

02:34 min | 2 months ago

Finding The Pieces of Yourself That You've Lost

"Is easier to go. Sleep is easier to procrastinate. Is easier to stop doing something. Because you're not feeling it right now but the things that we do on a daily basis provide us with the goals and the achievements that we want and it's just really hard sometimes to see your way clear through that forest through that foggy day to say i got to get me back like this was really happening right now right. You're in a situation where you feel like you've lost your self and the only person that can get you back. Is you so all the excuses that you've told yourself all the naps that you've taken all of the phone calls and emails that you didn't respond to all of the times that she said you were going to go somewhere and you were going to do something in the you just like faggot. I'm not doing it. All of that is because you lost a piece of you and you need to find that piece of peace which allows you to be as great as you possibly can now what you have to do in order to find that it's going to be different for each individual partisan but i'm a big for that you already know what's missing you already know what would make you happy. You already know what's not bringing you joy right now so when you evaluate this and you take inventory of who you are who you were and who you want to be. They may not be the same person. Oh shit somebody's just realizing this about themselves on Yeah issue you know who you. Were you know that there were certain things that brought you joy in that made you happy. And they're not doing it for you anymore and there are other things that you may be didn't even think about right and now that thing is making you happy and it is breaking you a piece of peace. So who do you need to find. You need to find you because some where along the line you lost the most important person to you which is yourself

You Get To Make This Up!

On The Verge

02:22 min | 2 months ago

You Get To Make This Up!

"You get to make this up. I thought about that this morning. When i was sitting with my journal and all of a sudden i wrote morning messages. Go back to morning messages. And i thought to myself as my as my doubting mind came in all. But you've tried that and you've gotten tired or you've got lost things to say or you weren't sure if it was working or not and then i wrote down in the next moment you get to make this up and not only do i get to make it up and try again. Get back on the horse. Do these morning messages again. But you get to make up your life as well you know at the end of the day. No one's really watching. No one's keeping score. No one's keeping count that you stopped and started something that you tried several times and maybe felt like you failed. No one is really watching so you get to make it up. Think about the things that are moving through that creative energy that creative impulse. What is it that is nagging at you in those early hours of the morning to pick your paintbrush backup to to try something new in how you move your body to let go of something. That's not working. We get to make this up and as we all know now after a year and a half of incredible uncertainty in the world. Nothing is forever we can change on a dime as we all had to change during the pandemic. We all became so nimble so flexible. Even if we didn't want to we did it anyway. Well how about if you want to help out if you want to change you wanna make it up. If there's anything that i can share in these morning messages. And i hope it comes through loud and clear is that we get to change. We get to change our story. We get to let go of what doesn't work anymore. We get to embrace who we are becoming and so if that means doing something that you've tried ten times before but you have a new impulse to do it just like i do with these morning messages. Then go for

Why Creativity Equals Productivity With Author Joe Sanok

Mindfulness Mode

01:18 min | 2 months ago

Why Creativity Equals Productivity With Author Joe Sanok

"You have got so much to say about creativity and productivity. Why is it that creativity causes us to be more productive. What's that all about. Yeah i think intuitive we know this and a lot of the science backs it up as well but just think about when you have your best ideas you know when you're stressed out or maxed out. It's when you're taking a shower when you're out for a hike when you're on a long drive and maybe turn off the radio for a while It's when our brains are able to rest when we're not really in that fight flight or freeze and so we know that if we're going to be more creative it doesn't start with having a week. That's maxed out and stressed out and then we have a weekend where we're just recovering that we go right back into it. It's where we start with the slowing down when we start with that that mindfulness and we allow our brains to relax. I and ask those hard questions of. What is this weekend. need From me and from my brain. How do i best myself for this next week. the idea that we work five full days and then for two days we take off. It just doesn't work anymore. And as we look at the research on the forty workweek and about making thursday the new friday we see emerging more and more that countries and businesses that are switching to a four day of work three days off are seeing better productivity and creativity.

Why We Need More Humanness on the Internet

Mindful Productivity Podcast

01:25 min | 2 months ago

Why We Need More Humanness on the Internet

"We just need more humanness on the internet. I think we think we have it. But i don't think we're there yet I don't think we're there yet. I know this. Because as soon as i like. Put a camera in front of my face or start talking on instagram stories. Or even go live. It's like i'm a nuanced version of myself. I'm still me. I'm still real. I'm still authentic. But i'm trying to be authentic. Does that make sense. So it's like. I'm almost not even thinking about how i'm talking now versus how i talk to my podcast right like i. I'm trying to convey something. So because of that i'm trying. I'm just a different version of myself. It's not it's not this like raw version of my of myself. I think that's we missed that online. And i think it's because like there's all these ways that we mask rate there's like professionalism and all these things and they make sense. I'm not saying we do away with those. But i just think that there's there's some kind of veil that if we could take it down online and really see more of ourselves. I think that's what tick talks doing right now. Honestly a lot of these talking head videos people are just having conversations about how they feel or literally breaking down into tears talking about their experiences and people are actually relating to other

Why We Need To Live Deliberately in the Present Moment

Mindfulness Mode

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Why We Need To Live Deliberately in the Present Moment

"Here today with murray history murray. Are you in mindfulness mode today. I certainly hope so. Well tell us murder. What does mindfulness mean to you. What does mindfulness mean in your world question and for me. Mindfulness is about. Are we living deliberately. Are we living awake to the moment or are we kind of in default mode in some automated program preprogramed robotic kind of existence. And i think we can all relate to that certainly some past point in our lives. We're just going through the motions and really for me. It's about how present. Can i be because we talk about presence in mindfulness quite often right. I mean it's the present moment right. It's a lot of practices of meditation techniques to connect with the present moment and. I'm sure everyone that's listening. Has heard the term present moment and connecting with the present moment and maybe has some techniques for that. Why are we interested in the present moment right if we take a step back and say what does the present moment offer that is tantalizing or should be of interest. Why not live in the past. Why not live in the future. They could be one of places of the imagination right. Well it turns out the present moment. Right for me is really intimacies domain. If we want to have an intimate relationship with life in all the relational aspects of life which is the people places and things that are around us. We want to have an intimacy with that then. We must be aware of it right now. Not in the past and not in the future because the person's right in front of us and expecting some interaction not in the past another future but right now and what's the benefit of intimacy will the benefit of intimacy is more love more sharing ke- and we're relation. Of course that creates. I think what we all want. Right ultimately

Murray
Finding Beauty in the Mundane

The Angry Therapist Podcast

01:32 min | 2 months ago

Finding Beauty in the Mundane

"Beautiful. Things things that i find beauty in i i wanted to say that The point of this is is to remind you guys that To train your brain to seek What i call nectar to seek beauty and things in the mundane. I think that when you can do that Then you're doing less of this whole you know chasing things that you don't have i think when we have the ability and i think it is an ability In like any ability it requires a practice to find value and beauty and things that are in front of us Then we can create happy more so than Always chasing things that you know that we're we've been dreaming of or things that are you know shiny and big and all of that and this is just a reminder that there are things in front of us that are just as beautiful just as meaningful we just have to train our brain to seek them right to notice them to find them to stretch them to appreciate them. Okay things i find beauty in edges. I find beauty in the the. It doesn't matter if it's art film books. Whatever i find beauty in In risk in the obtuse in you know Things that may not be appropriate anything that moves you and usually what moves you are found on the edges not not so much in the middle where their

Having Internal Freedom Is Everything

The Angry Therapist Podcast

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Having Internal Freedom Is Everything

"I want to talk about freedom predictable. I know but not in a patriotic sense Although i do think that's extremely important. As an american i value it. But says i'm also a therapist. I want to talk about freedom in an internal freedom sense I think internal freedom having a sense of freedom internally is one of the greatest roads to happy. It's actually not even a road. it's a highway. It's like the car pooling. I don't think you could really be happy or live a meaningful life without a sense of freedom. So let's talk about that. Well there are different areas of your life And when i'm coaching people always it always comes down to these two main areas right relationships and work like that takes up the most of your life pie and so first. Let's talk about What internal freedom looks like kind of on the surface right your day to day the parts of your life and then let's talk about How to accomplish or get to a place where you feel a sense of internal freedom through more of a spiritual angle more of a an abstract broad overall general Wellbeing if that makes any sense angle okay so first freedom in work now. I personally personally have so much experience because i've i have experienced work in career where i had no freedom and i got to say i i. It was miserable. And i felt like i was drowning every day. And you know that feeling from not having freedom it went in depends on what freedom looks like for you so for some people of not having freedom looks like long hours and no vacation for some people not having freedom. Looks like not being able to be creative for some people not having freedom means punching a clock or sitting behind the desk. I don't know what not having freedom looks like you for me. The most important thing is is is being able to swim in that. What anybody that is being able to Because i'm such a right brain person. If i'm not able to express myself creatively. I just i just start wilting. I i'm seeing the plant at the at the end of the movie. E t where whereas as e t is dying. The plant is wilting. And dying in front of your eyes. That is me. That plant is me at work without any creative

Enjoying Life Through Our Inevitable Mortality With Journalist Suleika Jaouad

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:45 min | 2 months ago

Enjoying Life Through Our Inevitable Mortality With Journalist Suleika Jaouad

"We are as the buddhist master pama trojan has said. We are all programmed for denial. There's something about the human condition that doesn't quite let us take in our mortality. I- often compare it to like trying to get one of my cats to look in the mirror. You just do it. You know or trying to put two magnets together. They won't quite touch. And i don't you know i don't quite know why it is and there are lots of practices in buddhism and the catholic tradition memento mori. Were you carry around like a stone in your pocket and touch it to remind yourself you're going to die and so one can get better at this but it requires a lot of work. Have you now that you are out of that situation. We should talk about how that situation resolved your health your health trails but do you find yourself forgetting once in a while that Before death it's all life. Yeah i forget. All the time i have moments like this morning where i knew we were gonna have this conversation and having a bad hair day and i rushed took a shower and then i felt totally ridiculous because a couple years ago i had no hair and so to be worried about a bad hair day. Especially on a podcast. Is you know a level of absurdity. That i'm fully aware of but i also think that there's there's good reason for why we we can't have that heightened awareness of our mortality if we were all live every day as if it were last we'd go bankrupt and probably make terrible decisions in the world but likely implode and so. I've come to delight in those moments of forgetfulness Because they feel like a real marker of of progress in and healing from me the flip side of that is that you know when i wake up in the morning all often remind myself of when i was at my sickest and might energy was so limited that i could do about three things every day. I could answer an email. I could watch a movie. I could see a friend. But i really had only enough energy to do three things three simple things and now when i go into my day i use as a kind of song exercise for myself of if i could only do three things today. What are the things that would feel most important most rewarding most

Pama Trojan
How Practicing Mindfulness Can Make Your Runs Easier and More Enjoyable

Another Mother Runner

02:42 min | 3 months ago

How Practicing Mindfulness Can Make Your Runs Easier and More Enjoyable

"Mindfulness helped you with with your your training like how so like like we're just like getting into like what your body's feelings you don't ever do it or does that. Mindfulness like help you with the pain. Like how did those two probably jumping way ahead of the script here but yes yes yes. ns right. So let's backtrack and just talk about what. Mindfulness is so. Mindfulness is about being fully present without judgment in the present moment. So that's sort of taking it to it's very very basic so most of us are thoughts or are on a continuum. We're either thinking about yesterday or thinking about tomorrow or thinking about at wanna do this or or with me like this is hurting. I'm bored or i'm terrible. Everybody so much better than me or whatever it is that goes through a mind. What either when you're exercising or just doing anything in life and that creates a lot of stress in a lot of tension the body but it also means you're not paying attention to the body which is really this brilliant vessel that is communicating with your brain constant lane. Letting you know when you're native something when you're a position as good or or or or beneficial when things are moving smoothly and were not but because we're so busy doing and looking outside of ourselves we don't actually pay attention to what the body's trying to tell us so the the process of being mindful which is non-judgmental awareness of the present moment. So that's like you know if you're outside and you're looking at the balloon out of the sky and then you hear that a bird singing it song and then you notice your feet on how they feel on the ground and you're just in this moment to moment awareness without judgment just simply observing witnessing if you will. So that's a meditation practice. That is a incredibly wonderful experience for anyone to do with any any time but you bring it into movement and now you've got the ability to pay attention to this brilliant body that's leading you know if and when you're in pain because you've just pushing yourself hard or you're in pain because that's actually a movement that's going to be hurting you later. So or you're noticing your breath you're noticing. How your feet or hitting the ground. Creating a rhythm and a meditation as opposed to thinking about you know a win is gonna end. And when i'm gonna get to that mile right so it's rather than focusing on on a goal on the end game. You're in the present moment so that allows you actually to go faster to go longer to enjoy it more in also be more present so that you don't get injured

Being Authentic and Present With Yourself

Tara Brach

02:32 min | 3 months ago

Being Authentic and Present With Yourself

"Authentic in such doorway and such a practice you know it is kind of the the emotional real emotional version of of practice of seeing things as they are in honoring man and owning that and it only for me leads to more more solid foundation and more and more transparency one of the one of the images that i think is so powerful for me with with the pandemic is that you know the jewish tradition the word sabbath literally means the one day. We don't turn one thing into another. And i feel like we've been forced into a global sabah and can't manipulate. We can't even dream too far ahead. And so we've been forced our turn to see the miracle in the ordinary to see the beauty in everything and everyone and and And i think you know said if we truly thomas merton new we truly be held each other. We fall down in worship each other and so here. We are forced to to say no. The dream isn't tomorrow. We can't defer life or our best selves or ourselves. It's all right here and that was one other like a powerful thing for me with the pandemic is or did i came upon us. I was very. I had a lot of echoes from my cancer journey An particularly this moment. When i was diagnosed i like anyone else. I went to this appointment with a doctor. Who told me i had cancer and i was alarmed frightened in thought. You must have the wrong folder. Can't be me. And but then when i left that office that day the door i had come through for out. Appointment was gone. No way back to life before that appointment and i also feel that humanity has been forced through that doorway with the pandemic. The old world is gone There's going back

Thomas Merton Cancer
Finding The True Honesty Within Ourselves With Author Stephenie Zamora

Mindfulness Mode

01:23 min | 3 months ago

Finding The True Honesty Within Ourselves With Author Stephenie Zamora

"Let's talk about truth. Let's talk about honesty. How do we find find are real honesty which is hidden. Sometimes deep within us definitely can be it takes really knowing yourself and who you are and being tuned into whenever you want to call it. So i refer to it as intuition it can be internet link. Be that gut feeling or just that deepest part of you. That really knows your truth and who. You're here to be an building a relationship to yourself so that you're able to discern between will. Everyone thinks i should go this way. And this seems really great on paper. But where do i really feel in my body and my heart and my soul and so having the ability to discern for yourself what's right and true for you and nobody else can do that and when other people try. That's where things kind of get messy because they're doing so they're trying to support us and guide us from a place of love. But they're not us and they're not in our life and they can't make these decisions for us and so i'm a really big advocates for having that relationship to your body because that's where intuition inner wisdom really lives and that requires quite a bit of presence and mindfulness able to feel that little like Netanyahu body says no or like. Oh yeah i feel myself saying yes to this. Even though it seems crazy and ridiculous on

Netanyahu
How We Can Bring More Play to Our Lives, and Why It's Worth Doing

This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

02:43 min | 3 months ago

How We Can Bring More Play to Our Lives, and Why It's Worth Doing

"Is this philosophical movement that it's like okay. Well if you can survive on like just water and you don't need anything then you can be happier or what around the cats. That doesn't sound like vaughn. At all that that was not my and i looked into like the the buddhist virtual of like. Oh maybe i need to get centered. And i do love mindfulness and meditation and stuff but i figured that that just gets me back to zero right that if i've been stressing myself the heck out trying to optimize my life and every possible way. If a couple times a day i get back to the center and get back to zero. That's great that's really helpful. Helps me kind of recenter and and think about things that are important. But that's not enough either. Getting getting back to zero is not really the goal of where i wanna do. I wanna follow like joy and passion. Play and i wanna like remember what it feels like to be a kid and be that geeked up about stuff that you're like me and i can't wait to get out of bed today and i. I kinda found that no amount of pushing is going to make that happen. You can't force fun. You can't plan and strategize and optimized and schedule play in a way that that's interesting and so i just sort of got to the place rose like i need to give all this up and then i found the play philosophy All kinds of cool people but I just read a ton of books over the last year around Play and enjoyment and enjoy and that really seems to resume of me with somebody who had a really fun playful childhood. I remember riding our bikes out with my brother and our two friends and just spending from sunup to sundown goofing around and playing and having fun or doing wiffle ball or Soccer or Anything whatever this word of mouth was trying to learn how to juggle or ride a unicycle or or something really loving the majority of my life right and when i ran out of something to do we came up with something else. If we got tired we rested and if we were hungry than we found something to eat and we didn't try to schedule those things tried to to live at his and that to me that philosophy made. Yeah i think for me. There's an element of spontaneity. Which you know if you if you try to plan everything in your calendar you know a blank space then you get lost in overwhelm of trying to get it all done right as if you're ever gonna get it all done with just allusion that we've sold ourselves and then you get to feel the guilt and the shame when you're done bad press. I didn't get it all done right. Okay where can you step back. I'm gonna create some. I'm gonna play it both ways. I need to have space for play free.

Vaughn Soccer
Embracing the Exhaustion of Life

The Shamans Cave

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Embracing the Exhaustion of Life

"Am i showing up of service. When so much of the conflict in the world is exhausting. Me because i i'm a libra. I like my scales balanced. And i thought we know we got through some times. And we'd be more imbalance and we're still not. Yeah well. I actually think you you said the key of of we really need to be looking at in. The show is exhaustion. People are exhausted. They're worn down and If you've been watching the shamans cave over the year years rene and i have done multiple shows on the power of Dismemberment as sonic initiation of where The ego and the body becomes so warm down in initiation you know in in Old sh- monocultures having to walk over glass or Fire walking or Having nail nails put in you or being buried for three days or having aunts In covered with honey and then red ants being put on you for three days and these were some of the milder. She hastens It was to wear you down until there was nothing left. But your spirit. Nothing left by your spirit and it was. It's the spirit that has the strength to get through and so what's happening. right now. Is people are exhausted and this is so positive. I know it doesn't feel good. I i understand the level of exhaustion that people are dealing with them. Hearing from many of you around did. And i am in the same sense. Same place. I do very little not because i'm afraid to go out but because i need an amazing amount of Just staring Time just to regenerate bit and so It's just really important to understand that the wearing down is one of the most important parts of the process before some healing can can

Rene
Meditation Teacher La Sarmiento Defines "Radical Kindness"

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Meditation Teacher La Sarmiento Defines "Radical Kindness"

"Law sarmiento. Welcome to the show. Thank you dan. great to be here. Thanks for having me. I told you this before we started rolling. But you have a really good voice great meditation voice then practising for awhile. Yes so in preparing for this. You've done a lot of chatting with members of the ten percent happier team. This is the first time that you and i are meeting. But i got all these prep documents at some notes from my team and one of the things that i know. You've been thinking a lot about is the difference between straight up kindness garden-variety kindness and radical kindness. What is the difference can you. Can you unpack that a little bit for me. Yeah thanks dan. Yeah to me kinds. I feel like we all have that capability in us naturally especially when we're in a good space and we have the capacity for that whether it be holding a door open giving directions to a tourist things like that just kind gestures to me. Radical kindness takes it kind of a step further. It asks something of ourselves. It could be something that's inconvenient. If my sister called and said i need you to come over right now but i'm in the middle of building lego or something that i'm really enjoying but knowing that my sister needs me. It's like okay. i can do that. I'll make time and so it really is not something that's necessarily easy to do. And i think that's what makes it radical asks a little bit more kind of going beyond the call of duty in a way but it doesn't feel like an obligation because to me that's different than the generosity of

Law Sarmiento DAN
The Relationship Between Rage and Trauma

Mindfulness Mode

02:38 min | 3 months ago

The Relationship Between Rage and Trauma

"The word rage never really came to mind. When i thought about my reaction to certain situations but now that i've learned more about the conscious and subconscious mind and how our minds work. I realize well. There is sometimes a level of rage that was gurgling or bubbling just below the surface certain personalities are specific words or phrases would potentially cause that gurgling rage to erupt. Sometimes the eruption was minor. And nobody else would even be aware of it. Sometimes i would do or say something that well it was just out of place and i kind of wonder myself. I think why did that happen. Why did i say that thing. Or why did i do such and such and in response to that now. I realized that what triggered was something related to probably to an early trauma in my life. So when i say trauma i want to be clear that an event that was traumatizing to me may seem like a nothing of to you. I used to think that all traumas where events like you know a car accident house fire sexual abuse. A- robbery well a quick online search tells us that in general trauma can be defined as a psychological emotional response to an event or an experience that is deeply distressing. So you know your definition of deeply distressing may be different from mine. Of course another definition says that trauma is the lasting emotional response that often results from living through a distressing event. There's were distressing again goes on to say experiencing a traumatic event can harm person sense of safety sense of self and ability to regulate emotions and navigate relationships long after the traumatic event occurs. People with trauma can often feel shame helplessness powerlessness and intense fear. You may have experienced trauma and don't even realize it for some while trauma could be just a very simple. You know what appears to be something. That is very simple for some. It could be much more

Trauma
Finding Your Personal Pathway To A Quiet Mind with lllustrator Kyle Webster

The Mindful Minute

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Finding Your Personal Pathway To A Quiet Mind with lllustrator Kyle Webster

"I think so. Many of us myself included. We start meditating. We think we're going to have this amazing peaceful lovely experience and ends up being the polar opposite. And we're having a little battle inside ourselves the whole time and so finding some pathway in to that quiet space for yourself you know. I think the gift is. It gives us muscle memory right leg. You you know that quiet space by we ha- we know how to access it whether it's through drawing whether it's through running god forbid or seeded. Whatever it is that you find that space through we start to build the muscle memory and then we can apply in other areas of our lives. Yeah i think you snapped into that that mode or whatever it is after having done it so many times if of course it takes practice. So that's why you know people describe innovation as a practice. And i literally is that the practice and the repetition leads to that facility and that that the speed at which you can access that that state of mind. My brother is a runner. He was a competitive runner division. One college still runs and and he does absolutely find that that peace of mind if you like her gets into that space when he runs and i think he was aware of that from the beginning and that is why he for years and years has been between the two of us. I have a twin brother. By the way he's been the more balanced more relaxed less neurotic twin. Whereas i always buzzing around my brain is never stopping and i have trouble sleeping and everything just didn't realize i had access to that even though i was doing it frequently i just didn't i wasn't aware of it

How Your Beliefs Can Become Self-Fulfilling Prophecies With Prof. Jamil Zaki

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:45 min | 3 months ago

How Your Beliefs Can Become Self-Fulfilling Prophecies With Prof. Jamil Zaki

"Research for the last couple of years has been focused on self-fulfilling prophecies. That is in particular what we believe about ourselves and each other can change how we act towards ourselves and towards other people and that can then change the experiences we have which then go into our beliefs at an if you can see the cycle here but in essence what happens. Is that the way that we believe the world to be can sometimes come true in my lab. We've studied a bunch of examples of where that goes wrong cynical and mistrusting beliefs corrosive beliefs. That can hurt us and the people around us. But i think whenever you study the dark side or something. The light side is right there underneath it. Okay so it would make sense than for me to believe that. Most people are basically good and to trust people. Is that what you're saying and couldn't there be a dark side to that where some people are. Don't have good intentions. And i could get burke of course and blind trust totally uninformed optimism that has no basis in any evidence can be really dangerous thing whenever we trust. We take a risk. But i think that increasingly our culture suffers from the opposite problem. Which is blind cynicism that without knowing anything about a person. I assume the worst about them. So for instance in nineteen seventy two forty. Five percent of americans agreed with the statement. Most people can be trusted by two thousand eighteen that had fallen to about thirty percent likewise at the same time. We've lost much faith in institutions in news media in governmental organizations but most of all in each other social trust has really eroded and i think what that means is that we're making many of us making decisions about people and about the social world absent and the evidence where we're not trusting entrusting and getting burned a really obvious problem right. I mean that's why we don't do it. We don't hand off our kids to people we don't know we don't loan tons of money to people we've never met because we don't want to get burned but blindly mistrusting. People can also cause us to lose lots of opportunities for instance opportunities to learn from them opportunities to connect and to build relationships. And i think that risk is that we don't see as much but is just as

Burke
How To Develop a Productive Mindset

The Angry Therapist Podcast

02:19 min | 3 months ago

How To Develop a Productive Mindset

"Productivity. The first thing is i want wanna talk about the mindset and the first thing is because i always begin everything usually with mindset i think It's something we don't think about because we're always action-oriented and especially in this case where productivity equals action or to most people. I want to challenge you to not think of it that way. So starting with your mindset. Throw away the checklist or at least Put it in your back pocket. Keep it in your notes on your phone. But don't have your checklist be The days roadmap. You know. I think so. Many of us are so focused on the scoreboard. What can we get done And the thing is we put so much pressure on ourselves that even if you wrote an entire book in one day you're still going to be like what else could i do. Did i do enough. you know. and so. Throw the checklist away because Your chance that you just gonna white knuckle through your your your daily tasks and There isn't going to be joy there's going to be balanced and instead of living and being present and enjoying life you're just gonna be running you know you're just gonna be you just just and this is how i live most of my life just like. What do i need to get done today. I need to get this shit done. And i just grind so throw that list away instead. Focus on your state. And what. I mean by. This is the frequency What you're drop into your body you know and design a day won't design wool starting with one day but every day design your days where you are Not dipping into a lower frequency so dread worry panic right. This is the state that he used to live in Because when that happens. I don't think you get a lot done you know. And when you are focusing on a checklist i personally it activates. My my stress activates my fighter flight. And so you wanna do things that don't activate your fight or flight instead Encouraged flow states.